300 Tragedies that might have been prevented if New York State made better use of Kendra’s Law.

 

Some killed or injured law enforcement officers. Some were killed or injured by law enforcement officers. Some killed family friends or strangers. Almost all were off treatment for mental illness at the time. No doubt that many of these could have been prevented if the individual was receiving appropriate treatment, something Kendra’s Law might have helped to ensure. (Source: Treatment Advocacy Center Preventable Tragedies Database.)

 

Date: 2/2010

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On February 21, 2010, Satnam Singh, 32, was killed by two police who caught him bashing his mother Kaur Balbir, 61, in the head with a frying pan. Singh refused to drop the pan. "Go away! Go away!" Singh screamed at the cops. Singh, sources said, was bipolar, pummeling his mother with a flat pan and Officer Brian McCarthy and an unidentified sergeant fired multiple shots at Singh who died at the scene. Balbir was taken to Lincoln Hospital, where she was in critical condition with a cracked skull, a fractured left shin and a busted left arm. Source: NY Daily News, 2/22/10

 

Date: 5/2010

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On May 11, 2010, 33-year-old Devi Silvia threw her 19-month-old child into the Hudson River before jumping in herself. The girl was hospitalized in critical but stable condition. Silvia was charged with attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment and endangering the welfare of a child. Silvia entered into an insanity plea deal in December with prosecutors. The judge told Silvia she must continue treatment, stay on her medication and provide status reports to the court. Source: Associated Press, 5/12/10; WABC-TV NY, 6/21/10; New York Post, 6/22/10; DNA Info, 11/21/11, 2/10/12

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Poestenkill, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2010, 70-year-old Robert Pryor Sr. called his daughter, 49-year-old Laurie Fisher, and his granddaughter’s boyfriend, 24-year-old Anthony Delgado, home from a trip to a local grocery store and then shot them both in the chest as they came through the front door. Pryor then turned the revolver on himself Authorities believe Pryor may have battled mental illness. Following the shootings, Delgado was in critical condition and Fisher was in serious condition at Albany Medical Center Hospital. Source: TimesUnion.Com, 7/14/10; cbs6albany.com, 7/14/10

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Manhattan, New York C, NY

Summary: On July 19, 2010, 33-year-old Julian Kurita fatally stabbed his father, 70-year-old Fumitaka “Frank” Kurita in the neck in the family's apartment and then slashed his own wrist, police said. Police say he appeared to be mentally disturbed, and neighbors were at a loss to describe what could have sparked a confrontation between father and son. Julian Kurita left college after a bout with mental illness. She said she believed he had struggled with schizophrenia since his early 20s. He faced murder and weapons charges. Subsequent History: On May 21, 2012, the 30-year-old Kurita was convicted of murder. Source: DNAinfo.com, 7/19/10; NYDailyNews.com, 7/20/10, 5/2/12, 5/21/12

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: On July 31, 2010, 26-year-old Keith John, an inmate at the Erie County Holding Center, committed suicide. Family members said John was diagnosed with Paranoid Schizophrenia. On July 28, 2010, John was arrested for violating a protective order against his girlfriend. Source: WIVB, 8/02/10; WKBW.com, 8/2/10

 

Date: 11/2010

Location: Long Island, Queens, NY

Summary: On November 20, 2010, 48-year-old Thomas Scimone, was armed with a shotgun and threatened to kill firefighters was shot by police as he ran from his burning home. He was in critical condition following the incident. A relative said she believed Scimone was not taking his medication for bipolar disorder. The incident began when Scimone set a fire in his living room. Police said he then threatened to gun down responding firefighters. He jumped out of a window and ran through the neighborhood with his shotgun. Police gave chase. He didn’t respond to their commands to drop his weapon, rather turned and pointed the shotgun at police who opened fire. Scimone, died at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center. Source: NY Daily News, 11/21/10; NBCNewYork.com, 11/21/10, 11/26/10

 

Date: 9/2010

Location: Greece, Monroe, NY

Summary: On September 29, 2010, 23-year-old Kurt Neusatz fatally stabbed his mother, 53-year-old Monica Neusatz in their home. His family reported he had been treated for schizophrenia since the age of 17. Source: 13WHAM.com, 9/30/10; DemocratandChronicle.com, 12/1/10; Associated Press, 1/4/11; GreecePost.com, 1/4/11

 

Date: 5/2011

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: On May 5, 2011, 55-year-old Benjamin Campione was fatally shot by police near the Regional Transportation Center. According to police, when Campione was confronted by Officers, he pulled a pellet gun that looked exactly like a Smith & Wesson revolver from his waistband and pointed it at Officers prompting them to open fire. Campione’s two cousins said he suffered from mental illness and was often homeless, wandering the streets of Syracuse. Campione’s brother said he’d been to police three times in the past year, alerting them that his younger brother wasn’t taking his medication and was slipping deeper into paranoid schizophrenia. According to the brother, Campione had a history of stopping his medication and acting bizarrely. Source: CYNcentral.com, 5/5/11, 5/8/11; The Post-Standard, 5/7/11

 

Date: 2/2011

Location: Syracuse, Onondago, NY

Summary: On February 1, 2011, 19-year-old Ravaun Mitchell was shot by Syracuse police after he refused to drop a knife. On June 29, 2011, a judge ruled that Mitchell was still mentally ill and dangerous. The judge ordered Mitchell held in the secure custody of state mental health officials for the next six months until another evaluation can be conducted. Mitchell’s defense attorney said the February 1 incident was the onset of mental health problems for his client and that Mitchell had responded well while on anti-psychotic medication following the incident. Source: 9WSYR.com, 2/24/11; The Post-Standard, 6/29/11

 

Date: 8/2009

Location: Schenectady, Schenectady, NY

Summary: On August 1, 2009, 25-year-old James Tomlin, diagnosed with schizophrenia, was fatally shot by a Schenectady police officer. When officers caught up with him, they tried to get him to drop the knife. When Tomlin lunged at Officer Ed Ritz, Ritz shot him. Tomlin's mother told the DA that her son, diagnosed with schizophrenia, was not on his medication at the time of the incident, according to the report. Source: CapitalRegion.ynn.com, 8/4/09; Times Union, 7/7/11

 

Date: 12/2009

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On December 17, 2009 30-year-old Vladimir Makarov, suffering from depression and paranoia, went to the roof of his grandmother's 24-story building and leapt to his death. Makarov’s suicide occurred only days after he was released from Montefiore Medical Center. Makarov checked into Montefiore on October 29, 2009, following a long hospitalization in Westchester County and prior suicide attempts. He told doctors he was hearing voices commanding him to jump off a building. When Makarov's family begged his doctors to let him spend Thanksgiving at home, they refused, according to his mother. She was surprised two weeks later when Makarov asked to leave and was discharged on December 9. Subsequent History: On July 8, 2011, Makarov’s mother sued Montefiore Medical Center for letting him leave the hospital's psychiatric unit despite signs he was suicidal. According to the suit, five days before his discharge, Makarov told doctors, "I lack the will to live. I feel nothing." Then he stopped taking his medication. Source: New York Daily News, 7/19/11

 

Date: 8/2011

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On August 10, 2011, 23-year-old Jorge Ruiz threatened to jump off the 70th-story ledge of the 30 Rockefeller Plaza. Ruiz suffers from schizophrenia Source: New York Daily News, 8/11/11

 

Date: 12/2011

Location: Spring Valley, Rockland, NY

Summary: On December 14, 2011, 48-year-old Herve Gilles was fatally shot after he attacked Spring Valley Police Officer John Roper and took away Roper’s nightstick. Roper responded to the scene where Gilles was throwing rocks at a bar. It was the second time that day that Roper had been called to the bar to deal with Gilles, who had been at the bar screaming unintelligibly about an hour earlier. Gilles’ friends said he was a chronically mentally ill man who could get out of control when drunk or off his medications. Prior History: Gilles had been arrested for criminal offenses 33 times since 1990, including eight felonies, four of which were violent. However, as the D.A. noted in the report, when Gilles wasn't drunk, off his meds, or high on marijuana, he was a great guy who did volunteer work with his church. Source: LoHud.com, 12/15/11; Village Voice, 5/8/12

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On April 27, 2009, Ex-Nets star Jayson Williams became 'suicidal' at Manhattan hotel and was tasered by NYPD police. Williams, 41, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in the runup to his 2004 trial for fatally shooting his chauffeur. Source: New York Daily News, 4/29/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 10/2002

Location: Queens Village, Queens, NY

Summary: Robert Jeanlord, 25, suffocated his mother Marie Jeanlord, 52, on October 28, 2002, before stabbing himself in the chest, because he thought she was poisoning him, authorities said. Police found Robert on the porch waiting for officers to arrive and his mother’s body in the bathroom of her Queens Village home. Police said Robert Jeanlord, who was undergoing psychiatric evaluation at Mary Immaculate Hospital last night, suffers from schizophrenia. He apparently stabbed himself twice with a kitchen knife. Source: Newsday, October 29, 2002

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Utica, Oneida, NY

Summary: On July 19, 2011, 30-year-old David. L. Trebilcock fatally stabbed 6-year-old Lauren Belius, while her twin sister Erica watched. On February 14, 2012, a judge found Trebilcock not criminally responsible for fatally stabbing Lauren due to mental disease or defect. During the trial, a forensic psychiatrist for the defense testified that Trebilcock suffered from paranoid schizophrenia with a poor prognosis. Source: OneidaDispatch.com, 7/21/11; New York, Observer-Dispatch, 2/14/12

 

Date: 7/2002

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Ray Valigorsky was arrested July 19, 2002 on an open-container violation and sent to Rensselaer County Jail after police found him passed out on a lawn in a public area in Troy, NY. Valigorsky was a paranoid schizophrenic who fought a lifelong battle with alcohol and had left his wife and children to live on the streets, refusing their efforts to help him. Sheriff's Department officials said that, after his arrest, Valigorsky was given Librium to ease alcohol withdrawal symptoms and was monitored by corrections officers every 15 minutes. But he was found unconscious in his cell, with no pulse, and was taken to Samaritan Hospital for resuscitation, where he later died. Former jail doctor Morteza Naghibi later told state investigators he'd given Valigorsky a muscle relaxant instead of Librium because an article he read in a medical journal recommended it, according to documents. Naghibi also said he'd never "had the chance" to see Valigorsky. Valigorsky's children filed a $72 million federal wrongful death lawsuit, blaming Naghibi and prison nurses for directly causing Valigorsky's death and criticizing the County Executive, the Sheriff, and other jail workers for failing to monitor the medical staff. The lawsuit was based on a state Commission of Corrections' report that said the homeless alcoholic was subjected to an illegal medical experiment -- and his death could have been prevented. Prior History: Valigorsky had 89 prior arrests in the city of Troy; 82 were for open container violations or failure to pay fines. Source: Albany Times Union, November 3, 2002 Times Union (Albany, NY) July 18, 2003 The Times Union, April 3, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Cicero, Onondaga, NY

Summary: John Victor Figueroa, 18, killed himself on September 10, 2002 by stepping in front of a truck on Interstate 481 near Syracuse, NY. Figueroa had been diagnosed with schizophrenia four months earlier after a suicide attempt and had been in and out of the hospital for two months prior to his death. His mother said his medication wasn't helping him, he became increasingly paranoid and began talking about suicide every day. On the day he died, he was scheduled to see a psychologist at Hutchings Psychiatric Center, an appointment he had waited two weeks to get. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), February 16, 2003

 

 

Date: 7/2005

Location: Queens Village, Queens, NY

Summary: Billy Audobon, a 28-year-old man with a history of mental illness and substance abuse, was shot in the arm by a police officer on July 3, 2005 after the man's family called 911 saying he was acting erratically. According to his family, Audubon, who has bipolar disorder, called them shortly before the confrontation to say he had broken into his father's bedroom in the Audubon's Queens Village, NY apartment and taken a handgun. He then threatened to kill himself. When police arrived, Audubon was holding the gun at his side. The officers yelled at him to drop it, and when Audubon didn't respond, one of them fired a single shot, striking him in the right arm and forcing him to lose his grip on the gun. Source: Stamford Advocate, July 4, 2005

 

Date: 6/2012

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: On June 21, 2012, Rochester Police officers fatally shot Israel Andino outside his home after he fired a shotgun at them. Andino's stepfather said he suffered from bipolar disorder and was off his medication. Source: WHEC, 6/21/12

 

Date: 3/2012

Location: Jamaica, Queens, NY

Summary: On March 15, 2012, 30-year-old Shereese Francis died after a confrontation with police. The incident began when Francis’ family called for assistance to get her to the hospital. Francis, who wasn't taking the medication prescribed for her schizophrenia, had become emotionally distraught. Source: Gothamist.com, 4/3/12; Village Voice, 6/26/12

 

Date: 7/2002

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Michael T. Bennett, a 28-year-old man with schizophrenia, died in the Erie County Holding Center on July 5, 2002 after a struggle involving at least six sheriff's deputies who were trying to take him from the jail to Erie County Medical Center. Medical experts for the state determined Bennett died from traumatic asphyxia, contradicting the county medical examiner's finding of cardiac arrhythmia associated with coronary artery disease. A grand jury cleared several jail deputies of criminal wrongdoing, although a state commission said Bennett's death could have been prevented if he had received proper emergency mental health care at the holding center. Bennett's mother, Reola Bennett, said she had called police to report that her son was acting strangely and that she feared he might crash his car In August 2008, Erie County agreed to pay $1 million to settle a wrongful-death lawsuit. Source: Newsday, 1/24/04; Buffalo News, 1/25/04, 8/15/08; The Associated Press, 2/1/04

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Southampton, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On February 4, 2004, 35-year-old David Glowczenski's parents dialed 911 for help in subduing their son. Four police officers from the Southampton, NY police department arrived and found him screaming and wailing incomprehensively. Within moments, all five were in a wrestling match. It took more than two minutes for the officers, using Mace and a stun gun, to get Glowczenski on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back. He continued to kick and scream, but abruptly stopped. The officers told investigators that when they turned Glowczenski over on his back, they noticed he was unconscious and not breathing. Less than an hour later, he was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital. Glowczenski's family said he was treated with unnecessary force. Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick of the Suffolk police homicide unit said the officers acted properly, and that Glowczenski, who was schizophrenic, had taken himself off his medication a week earlier. The incident began when Glowczenski overheard his mother and two brothers talking about their plans to hospitalize him. Subsequent History: On September 20, 2004, Glowczenski's family filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Village of Southampton, its Police Department and Suffolk County. The family also sued Taser International Inc. for $1 billion. The complaint said that Glowczenski was beaten, sprayed with Chemical Mace and shocked nine times with a Taser by the four police officers. The Suffolk County medical examiner's office termed the death natural, and due to "acute exhaustive mania due to schizophrenia." Glowczenski's family later hired an independent pathologist to review reports from two separate autopsies and other materials about his death.The investigator found that Glowczenski sustained injuries from excessive force and did not die from natural causes, the family said. In May 2005, the Justice Department opened it's own criminal investigation Prior History: The police had responded to calls about Glowczenski's behavior over 40 times in the past five years, according to Suffolk County police. His sister took out a restraining order against him in 2000 and 2001. Glowczenski had been institutionalized twice prior to his death. Source: Newsday (New York), April 11, 2004; New York Times, September 21, 2004; Daily News, September 21, 2004; Daily News, April 21, 2005; Long Island Newsday, June 7, 2005

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: Freeport, Nassau, NY

Summary: Michelle Sambriski, 34, and her 2-year-old daughter, Gina, were found dead on July 23, 2003 in Sambriski's cousin's Freeport, NY home, where they had been living for the past four months. Sambriski's cousin found Gina's body lying face down in the bathtub, and officers searching the home later found Sambriski hanging in the garage, police said. Sambriski left behind a note that provided detectives with enough information to conclude that she had drowned her daughter and then killed herself. The child's father, Brian Ramirez, had reported Sambriski to Nassau County child protective services two months earlier when he learned that she had been evicted from her apartment and had gone off medication for her bipolar disorder. A subsequent investigation failed to show any incidents of abuse or neglect and was closed weeks later. In 2002, Sambriski and Ramirez were due in family court to discuss visitation, the Ramirez family said, but Sambriski never showed up. Ramirez had planned to go to Nassau Family Court on July 29, 2003, to again petition for visitation. Ramizer has filed a lawsuit against Nassau County, claiming Child Protective Services failed to heed his warnings about the mother's instability. Susbsequent History: An April 2004 report on Gina Sambriski's death by the state Office of Children and Family Services criticized Nassau's Department of Social Services for closing the case prematurely - without confirming Sambriski's psychological history, as the girl's father had detailed. Other mistakes included the worker's failure to ask Sambriski to release her medical records to see if she was seeking mental health treatment. The abuse investigator also never interviewed relatives who would have been familiar with her emotional problems, even though Ramirez provided a list. Had he contacted Sambriski's mother, he might also have found out Sambriski had previously attempted suicide, county police records show. The investigator also never pursued why she recently had been evicted or even how she was supporting herself and her daughter. Source: Newsday (New York), July 25, 2003 Newsday, September 7, 2003 Newsday, August 23, 2004

 

Date: 1/2004

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Spalding Gray, the masterful monologist of "Swimming to Cambodia", who turned his darkest fears about life and death into riveting one-man theater pieces that defined the genre, was confirmed dead on March 8, 2004 when a body found in the East River in New York City was identified as his. Gray, 62, was reported missing by his wife, Kathleen Russo, on January 11, 2004 after he missed a meeting with a friend and a scheduled flight to Aspen for a ski trip. It was speculated then that Gray had jumped from the Staten Island ferry, reportedly the last place he was seen alive. Gray had been severely depressed since a near-fatal car accident in Ireland in 2001 that had left him with a number of health problems, including paralysis in one foot. After he returned to the U.S. he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and placed on medication. Prior History: Gray attempted suicide a number of times. In 2002 he nearly jumped off a bridge in Long Island. He later spent a month in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital. In September 2003, he phoned his wife to say he wanted to jump off the Staten Island ferry, but police were alerted and removed him before he could carry out his plan. Source: Los Angeles Times, March 9, 2004

 

Date: 11/2004

Location: Nyack, Rockland, NY

Summary: A 36-year-old woman jumped to her death from the Tappan Zee Bridge in Nyack, NY on November 22, 2004 after telling her father she was going to return movies at a video store. Stephanie White initially survived the 200-foot drop into the Hudson River but was pronounced dead soon after Thruway Authority employees pulled her from the water a short time later, state police said. No suicide note was left behind, but White's mother said she was battling bipolar disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder, and that her condition had worsened in recent weeks. White's parents had taken her to the doctor days earlier and were looking into an outpatient psychiatric program for her. Source: The Journal News, November 23, 2004

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Harris, 24, attacked his 18-month-old nephew Priest Jefferson and the baby's parents after beating his own mother with a hammer inside their apartment on February 13, 2006. Cops responding to numerous 911 calls from neighbors found the little boy bloodied and lying on the living room floor as Harris held the boy's mother, Leasia Bolden, 20, in a choke hold and stabbed her on a nearby bed, sources said. After ordering him to drop the weapon, an officer fired one round at Harris, who stabbed his sister again before lunging at the cop, police said. Harris was shot once more and pronounced dead at the scene, sources said. Family members and sources said Harris was bipolar and taken out of an institution recently by his mother, 49-year-old Charlene Harris, a deeply religious woman and tenant association president. "He was supposed to be taking his pills. He just went berserk," said Carolyn Harris, his aunt. Police sources also said Harris was angry that his mother wouldn't cook him dinner last night. Harris had a 2005 arrest for drug charges and he had to be forcibly removed from the family's home in 2004, a source said. Source: New York Daily News, February 14, 2006

 

Date: 11/2006

Location: Manorville, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On November 18, 2006, Carolyn Buonnano was arrested after fatally stabbing her husband, Raymond, 43, three times on the neck before slitting her own throat in a botched suicide attempt. Buonnano was charged with second-degree murder. Subsequent History: On February 11, 2008, Carolyn Buonnano, who stabbed her husband to death in an apparently unprovoked attack in their home entered an insanity plea. In a deal with prosecutors, Buonnano, 39, entered a plea of not responsible by reason of mental disease in Suffolk County Court. Judge James Hudson ordered Buonnano to undergo treatment at a psychiatric hospital. Her attorney, Eric W. Naiburg of Central Islip, said a forensic psychologist testified that Buonnano was psychotic before and after the event. The couple had a good marriage that was interrupted by her mental disease, Naiburg said. "She was a paranoid schizophrenic and she believed he was trying to do her wrong," Naiburg said. Assistant District Attorney Nancy Clifford said Buonnano was "unable to appreciate the nature of what she did." Source: Newsday, 2/12/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New Cassel, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 24, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, described as emotionally disturbed and afraid of losing custody of her children called the police and led them into a blood-spattered bedroom where her young daughter and two small sons lay slain on a bed, investigators said. Brewer, 27, who lived with the children in an apartment in the Nassau County hamlet of New Cassel, was taken to a hospital for physical and mental examinations. Later that evening, she was charged with the murder of all three children. Neither the police nor the county medical examiner said what caused the death of the children, who were identified as Jewell Ward, 6; Michael Demesyeux, 5; and Innocent Demesyeux, 18 months old. But investigators said one appeared to have been drowned, while the others had been slashed to death. Prior History: Nassau authorities declined to discuss any motives behind the killings. But relatives and acquaintances described Ms. Brewer as emotionally unstable. The two fathers of the children said they had tried through the courts to gain custody. Ricky Ward, Jewell’s father, said he had been trying in Family Court for a year. In the 12 years that he had known her, Mr. Ward said Ms. Brewer had tried to kill herself a number of times. The Nassau police said they were investigating a report that she had jumped out a window of her apartment on the day of the killings. “He problem was her mind state,” Mr. Ward said. “She wasn’t stable and wasn’t able to communicate. She didn’t want anyone to have her kids. It’s a tragedy that my daughter’s gone.” Innocent Demesyeux, the father of Ms. Brewer’s two sons, said that he and Ms. Brewer had been battling in court for 18 months over visitation rights and custody of the boys, and that she feared she might soon lose custody. He said that he and Ms. Brewer had a date in Nassau County Family Court on February 25, and that he had hoped to win the case. He said Ms. Brewer had missed court dates recently and had refused to take drug tests. He said that he had recently been in contact with a county child protective services agency and that a representative was to have visited Ms. Brewer’s apartment on February 22. It was unclear if that visit took place. Some neighbors said Ms. Brewer had behaved bizarrely. “I used to see her walking down the street during the day in her pajamas,” said Lisa Jones, who said she was a distant relative of Ms. Brewer. Asked if Ms. Brewer had seemed mentally unstable, Ms. Jones said, “Absolutely.” The Rev. Elijah Crawford, pastor of the Healing Power Church, spoke on behalf of the family at the Westbury home of a relative of Ms. Brewer’s, where family members had gathered. He said he had been told that Ms. Brewer had snapped because money she had expected from a social services agency — money she needed for the children — had failed to arrive. She didn’t get it, and snapped out,” the pastor said. He later said of family members: “They don’t know what happened. All they know is that she snapped. They said she had great love for her children. It’s just something that happened all of a sudden.” Source: NY Times, 2/25/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Queensbury, Warren, NY

Summary: On February 26, 2008, Stanley W. Chrostowski, 50, died after being struck by a tractor trailer. Investigators said he was driving southbound in the northbound lanes of the Northway when his car hit the truck head-on. The 2003 Ford Mustang he was driving broke in two pieces from the force of the high-speed, head-on collision. Officials at the scene said the crash happened at about 4:20 a.m., when Chrostowski struck a Stewart's truck south of Exit 18. The truck, a refrigerated box truck owned by Stewarts Shops, burst into flames, and the driver escaped with little more than a bump on his head, said West Glens Falls Fire Chief Michael Gordon. Gordon called it a "miracle" he was not seriously hurt. He was treated at Glens Falls Hospital and released. He was identified as Kevin Palmatier of Lake Luzerne. Prior History: Chrostowski had an extensive history of treatment for mental illness, and investigators were looking into whether he intentionally drove in the wrong lane in an effort to commit suicide. Two neighbors of Chrostowski who said he had recently stopped taking his medication for mental illness said they believed he committed suicide. One said he had made a comment Monday that she would have a "new neighbor soon." Source: Glenn Falls Post Star, 2/26/08

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On August 6, 2002, Jason-Eric Wilson, 16, killed himself, swallowing every pill he could find in his family's Harlem shelter hotel room, including his own psychotropic medication. Wilson suffered from depression, anxiety and paranoid schizophrenia. His family was evicted from their Brooklyn home last year and his mental state grew worse since that time. In the year prior to his death, Wilson was hospitalized twice for mental illness. But in the last two weeks, Jason's troubles were compounded as his family turned to the city for shelter. With his father and his 10-year-old sister, Lani, Jason was bounced between temporary shelter rooms and the crammed Emergency Assistance Unit in the Bronx, where he had to sleep on the floor. The Wilsons went to the Emergency Assistance Unit to seek shelter on July 25, and there a city nurse noted on the screening form that Jason was suffering from paranoid schizophrenia. Attached were several letters from a Payne Whitney Clinic psychiatrist who had been treating Jason. The most recent letter, dated July 19, warned that Jason's emotional health was deteriorating because of "environmental instability, including threats of homelessness and poverty." Source: The New York Times, August 8, 2002

 

Date: 4/2000

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: James Murphy was shot and killed by police on April 22, 2000 in Queens after assaulting his mother and slitting his own wrists. Neighbors called 911 after Murphy's mother, Dorothy, 70, fled to a nearby house to take shelter after a violent fight with her son inside their home. After Murphy's mother escaped, Murphy went searching for her and then stood in the middle of their street, screaming. Murphy ran to confront officers who had pulled up in a patrol car. He pointed his gun at them and refused to drop it when ordered. He was then shot several times by police officers. Police said he had a history of mental illness and was admitted to an undisclosed hospital for psychiatric evaluation April 5 after threatening his mother. Source: Daily News (New York), April 23, 2000, p. 13

 

RecordID: 860

Date: 1/2000

Location: , , NY

Summary: Alan Zelencic, 28, was shot and killed by police after he lunged at them with a 15-inch knife. He had just slashed his mother with a knife and the police were trying to apprehend him when the shots were fired. His mother was treated and released. Zelencic didn't have a criminal history, but he did have a history of mental illness for which he had been treated at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in 1991. Police officials said Officers Caruso and Dudley did not appear to have violated department guidelines that govern situations in which officers confront emotionally disturbed people. Source: The New York Times, January 18, 2000, p. 3

 

Date: 5/2006

Location: Brooklyn, King, NY

Summary: Valerie Burgher, 34, a New York-based black journalist and writer who battled bipolar disorder, was hit by a train in a Brooklyn subway station on May 31, 2006 and died hours later of her injuries, the family said. After an autopsy, the New York City Medical Examiner’s office ruled the death a suicide. Source: Maynard Institute, June 4, 2006

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Alberto Menegro, 42, was charged with second-degree murder and first-degree assault in a fatal attack on his 8-year-old niece and other relatives in their Manhattan apartment. Police said that Menegro claimed to be "hearing voices in his head" when he killed the girl by slitting her throat and attacked other relatives on October 19, 2003. Menegro was alone in the kitchen with his sister's only child when he suddenly snapped and stabbed the 8-year-old with a steak knife, police said. Other relatives at home heard blood-curdling screams coming from the room, and the mom and uncle rushed in to see what was going on, cops said. Horrified at the sight of the dying girl crumpled on the floor, they tried to stop Menegro, who stabbed and wounded both of them, police said. Menegro's relatives told police he had been treated for schizophrenia at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital as recently as March 2003, but that he stopped taking his medicine. Menegro, who also cut his own throat during the incident, was moved to Bellevue Hospital after being treated at Harlem Hospital. Source: New York Post, October 21, 2003 The Daily News, October 20, 2003 New York Post, October 23, 2003

 

Date: 3/2001

Location: , , NY

Summary: Juan Arequipa, 49, spiked a bottle of Coca-Cola with cyanide and tried to get his unsuspecting teenage children to join him in a fatal toast. Fortunately, both children survived. After Arequipa's son saw his father and sister were getting sick and collapsing, he called 911. The father and daughter were unconscious when ambulance workers arrived, and Arequipa later died. His daughter was in critical but stable condition the next day. Police sources stated that Arequipa was distraught and depressed. Family members stated that he had spoken of suicide and was being treated with medication for depression. Source: Newsday, March 24, 2001

 

Date: 3/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In Brooklyn, NY, Georgia Charlton, 24, a woman with schizophrenia, attempted suicide in jail in March 2004, days before she was sentenced to 17 years in prison for throwing a liter of acid on her boyfriend in 2001. Prior History: Georgia Charlton, 21, threw a liter of acid onto her boyfriend, Tenlin Lyew, permanently disfiguring his face on June 18, 2001 in Brooklyn, NY. Charlton was trying to scar Lyew for life because he threatened to leave her if she had an abortion - but then left her anyway after she delivered their baby, law-enforcement sources said. She had pleaded not guilty, claiming in court documents that she doused Lyew with industrial-strength drain opener after he tried to beat her. Charlton, who has been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, and Lyew started a steamy love affair in their native Jamaica. Source: New York Post, March 16, 2004 New York Post, April 15, 2003

 

Date: 4/2004

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: A woman suffering from schizophrenia and Crohns Disease jumped seven stories to her death on Central Park West in New York City during a Seder visit to her mother's home on April 5, 2004, police sources said. Elizabeth Levy, 43, narrowly missed striking someone making a delivery, said a doorman at the 14-story building. The death leap happened just past 8:30 p.m. while Levy, from Palo Alto, Calif., was visiting her mother for Passover, police said. She was pronounced dead on arrival at St. Luke's Hospital. A police source said Levy left behind a suicide note in which she discussed wanting to be buried according to the tenets of a new age Eastern religion she had been following. Source: Newsday (New York), April 6, 2004

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Elmsford, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison, and Morgan accepted the plea bargain, unwilling to have the court case continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's court-appointed attorney, Robin Bauer, said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Subsequent History: Morgan, 51, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Source: White Plains Journal News, April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 12/2003

Location: Dannemora, Clinton, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, 51, a man with schizophrenia, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Prior History: Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison and Morgan accepted the plea deal, unwilling to allow the court case to continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's attorney said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Source: White Plains Journal News (NY), April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2006

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On September 30, 2006, Joseph Bernazard held Phyllis Fine at knifepoint and threatened to kill her on Brooklyn's trendy restaurant row before a sharpshooter cop killed him with a single bullet. Fine was within inches of her attacker when Officer Louis Gubitosi pulled the trigger and killed the 26-year-old man on the upscale block. Fine said Bernazard, who moments earlier had sliced another women's neck, never spoke to her as he held her by the hair. He instead yelled over and over, "Kill me now! I want to die!" Bernazard's family said he had a history of mental illness and had taken a turn for the worse recently. "They're after me," he told his sister Yolanda. The saga began when Bernazard, who was hallucinating and hearing voices in his head, was taken to Long Island College Hospital on September 30. But he tore out his IV and walked out of the hospital against doctors' wishes. He was still wearing his medical bracelet when he was killed. On the day of the incident, Bernazard grabbed Julie Jacobowitz, 32, a social worker talking on a cell phone with a friend as she walked home from the gym. "If they kill me, I won't have to hurt you," Bernazard told Jacobowitz, police sources said. But as he spoke, he was already slicing into her neck, causing her to scream in agony. A group of construction workers confronted Bernazard, who told them, "The cops are going to have to kill me." When police raced up seconds later, Bernazard pushed the bleeding 32-year-old woman away and ran about 2 blocks to the Met Food Market, where he grabbed Fine by the hair. "He started yelling, 'I'm going to kill her!' " Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said. Cops surrounded Bernazard outside the store. For 10 minutes, the cops tried to reason with Bernazard, telling him to drop the knife. But he refused and crouched down behind Fine. After the shooting, an ambulance took Bernazard back to the same hospital he had walked out of hours before. He was declared dead on arrival. His victims were not seriously hurt. Source: New York Daily News, October 1, 2006

 

Date: 4/2004

Location: Manhasset, Nassau, NY

Summary: Jessie Weiner, 24 and her mother Judith, 60, were found dead in a Manhasset, NY motel after overdosing on pills on April 14, 2004. A bottle of prescription drugs was found inside the room but no suicide note was left, police said. The two were reported missing several days earlier when Barry Weiner, 57, walked into a police stationhouse and said his wife and daughter had not returned to their Douglaston, Queens home after leaving in the family car. Sources said Judith Weiner, a retired city elementary school teacher, had kidney problems and suffered from depression, and that Jessie Weiner was bipolar. "She was despondent and had a lot of medical problems," Barry Weiner said of his wife. Both women had attempted suicide in the past. Detectives from the NYPD's missing persons squad used credit card information to track them to the motel. It was unclear when they checked in. Source: New York Daily News, April 15, 2004

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Anatoly Dimitriev, a 62-year-old man was shot and killed in a confrontation with police on December 16, 2006. Neighbors said Dimitriev appeared to be mentally ill. They saw Dimitriev throwing bottles out his apartment window and chopping at trees with an ax in the courtyard of the co-op apartment building where he lived with his 41-year-old son in the city's Bronx borough. After receiving several emergency calls about an elderly man with a hatchet, police responded to Dimitriev's apartment building. By the time they arrived, Dimitriev had barricaded himself in his apartment, holding his son hostage. Police burst through the apartment door, and Dimitriev fled through a window onto the fire escape, leaving his unharmed son behind. Police followed Dimitriev, demanding he lay down the ax. When he began to come at police with the weapon, an officer shot him. Two bullets struck the 62-year-old in the abdomen. Dimitriev was taken to an area hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Source: Associated Press, December 18, 2006

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: On December 31, 2006, an Erie County sheriff's deputy fatally shot Roger S. Duchnik after he repeatedly lunged at the deputy and his partner with a hunting knife. Deputies James Mirusso and Benjamin Pisa were investigating a complaint from a resident of an apartment complex on North Buffalo Street who reported that another resident, Duchnik, was threatening people. The person making the complaint described Duchnik, 52, as mentally ill and off his medication. The deputies tracked Duchnik to his mother's home on Springville-Boston Road in Concord, where they encountered him at the bottom of a steep driveway. They followed Duchnik as he ran up the driveway and ordered him to take his hands out of his pockets. Duchnik turned back toward the deputies and pulled out a knife about 8 inches long and began lunging at the deputies. Mirusso backed up and fell down a 15-foot embankment after Duchnik swiped near his midsection. Believing his partner had been cut and fearing for his own life, Pisa fired at least three rounds from his handgun, killing Duchnik. Source: Buffalo News, January 1 & 3, 2007

 

Date: 1/2007

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In January 2007, Blondel Lassegue, an emotionally disturbed Brooklyn man, died of a heart attack after being Maced and Tasered by the police. A relative called the police when Lassegue was acting up at his uncle's house in Queens, saying he was depressed and delusional, he had recently gone off medication for bipolar disorder and depression. The police had difficulty in restraining 38 year old Lassegue; when the Mace did not subdue Lassegue, they Tasered him. Lasssegue then had a heart attack and was pronounced dead at a Long Island Hospital. Four officers were injured and three were hospitalized with non-serious injuries. Lassegue, who graduated from Hunter College and was recently ordained as a minister through a church in Las Vegas, had been upset over the recent deaths of his mother and grandmother. Lassegue's family says they will be consulting with a lawyer. Source: Gothamist, January 8, 2007; Precinct Flushing Times, January 25, 2007

 

Date: 10/2001

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Police killed a mentally ill Bronx man who shot and injured his sister, Angelika Brinker, 38, and his roommate, Shamula Subaka, 41. Police said the shooting occurred because Malik Mustafa was pointing a pistol at his sister's head and refused to yield. Mustafa, 36, has a history of psychological problems. Police speculate Mustafa's failure to take his medication triggered this incident. Source: Newsday

 

Date: 4/2004

Location: New York, , NY

Summary: A Bronx teenage boy and his transgender "girlfriend" spent four hours in negotiations with police in New York's Central Park after they climbed a tree dressed only in their underwear and engaged in sex acts on April 22, 2004. The couple claimed the incident started out as a suicide attempt, in which both men were going to jump from the tree. Christopher Montero, 17, was charged with multiple misdemeanors and released from custody. His pre-operative transsexual lover, 32-year-old William Rund, was held at Bellevue Hospital for evaluation. Both Montero and Rund are on antidepressants to combat bipolar disorder and were "very stressed out," Montero said. The pair met three months ago in an online chat room. Martin Rivera, who cares for Rund's grandfather, said lately Rund was acting "even more outlandish" than usual. Rund was arrested April 14, 2004 for holding a kitchen knife to Rivera's throat, charged with several misdemeanors and released. Prior History: Montero was diagnosed in December 2003 with bipolar disorder, said his mother, Rose Montero. Montero had been truant from school since December 2003, when hallucinations and suicide threats landed him in the Bronx-Lebanon Hospital's psych ward. His former parochial school would not take him back. Montero said she tried to enroll her son in a mental health program through the public schools, but the Education Department didn't offer any options - until after the tree stunt. Source: New York Post, April 26, 2004 Daily News, April 24 & 29, 2004

 

Date: 6/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Dawn Mitchell, 46, was charged with fatally stabbing her sister, Ruby, 49, a Brooklyn church worker, capping a long-running feud during a furious argument on June 19, 2003. Dawn was also wounded in the neck, but cops said it was not clear if her injuries were self-inflicted. Neighbors said Ruby, who had devoted her life to helping her sister battle her mental problems, had gone to Dawn's house after the younger woman was sent home from her job at a senior-citizens center because of strange behavior. Ruby, who had often asked co-workers to pray for her sister, was stabbed in the neck and chest. Source: New York Post, June 24, 2003

 

Date: 10/2002

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: Alfred Nelson, 36, was taken to the emergency room of a psychiatric hospital in Staten Island, NY, where police said the 6-foot-2, 275-pound man became violent and had to be subdued with pepper spray, medication, and physical force on October 30, 2002. Nelson, who battled paranoid schizophrenia for 15 years, was pinned by a dozen people, including several cops, and injected with medication. He was pronounced dead an hour later. The city medical examiner ruled Nelson's death a homicide by asphyxia that aggravated a heart condition. A grand jury heard testimony from 30 witnesses in the case, but declined to issue any indictments. The family is seeking $50 million in damages from the city; Bayley Seton Hospital; St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Centers, which runs Bayley Seton, and hospital security firm Burns Security. They also want $50 million in punitive damages from all parties except the city. Source: Daily News (New York), July 23, 2003

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On July 17, 2008, police fatally shot Spencer Parris, 39, in the chest. The officer, whom the Police Department would not identify, had been on patrol with a partner when they were flagged down by a taxi driver carrying a female passenger. The woman, 28, whom the police did not identify, told them she had been assaulted by Parris and needed to return to their apartment to retrieve belongings before going to stay with a friend. Police Department’s chief spokesman, Paul J. Browne said police went with her, knocked on the door to their apartment, and identified themselves. Parris said he was not coming out, but suddenly flung open the door, with a knife in his hand. Browne alleged that Parris told police several times that he was going to kill them. The officer, who had backed down the hallway was backed against a neighbor’s door when he shot Parris. Parris was pronounced dead at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital. Allegedly, Parris had punched his companion in the face and had pulled her hair after they argued over plans to see a midnight movie. The woman had filed a report in February, soon after they moved into the apartment, complaining that he had assaulted her. The police have reports of two domestic incidents there in March. The woman told the police that they met over the Internet, and that she later found out that he had bipolar disorder and had once tried to commit suicide. Source: New York Times, 7/19/08

 

Date: 1/2000

Location: Garden City, Nassau, NY

Summary: Lorecia Cox, 39, a woman with bipolar and multiple personality disorders, committed suicide in the Nassau County jail in Garden City, NY in January 2000 after being taken off her mood-stabilizing medication. She was in jail for allegedly writing a $64,000 bad check. Source: Newsday (New York), November 5, 2003

 

Date: 8/2001

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: In August 2001, 26-year-old Fitzroy B. Vines Jr. - known as "Fitz" or "Junior" - hanged himself in Rochester, NY. A friend said he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder but had never filled his medication prescription to treat it. Vines had attempted suicide once before, in 1997, when he tried to hang himself in his fraternity room in college after a fight with his girlfriend. He was treated at a hospital, then received outpatient care. In a suicide note addressed to his mother, Vines wrote that he was afraid of the future. "I don't feel I can make it, I don't even have a picture of how my life would of ended up." Source: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, November 23, 2003

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Riker's Island, , NY

Summary: In February 2003, 29-year-old Carina Montes, a woman with bipolar disorder who was on suicide watch, hanged herself with a bed sheet in her Riker's Island jail cell. Several hours before Montes' death another inmate saw her tearing bed sheets and threatening to kill herself. But the guard who was called had no idea she was on suicide watch, did not notice the sheets and never reported the incident. Investigators later determined that a psychiatrist had never seen Montes during her five months in the jail, and none of the mental health workers had access to her previous psychiatric records. Montes was at Riker's on a shoplifting charge. Source: The New York Times, February 28, 2005

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Albany, Albany, NY

Summary: On May 15, 2004, Bart Browne, a 33-year-old man with schizophrenia, hung himself at his family's farm outside Albany, NY. Two weeks earlier, he had pleaded guilty to second-degree assault under the state's hate crimes law to avoid a trial and a possible 15 years behind bars, his mother, Mary Browne said. The plea deal with the Albany County district attorney's office would have sent the father of two to state prison for up to four years. Browne was scheduled to be sentenced on June 24, 2004. Prior History: Browne was accused of punching a man outside an Albany bar in October, 2003 because he was upset to see him kissing another male. The single punch broke the 28-year-old victim's jaw and caused a permanent loss of feeling in his left cheek. Mary and Stephen Browne acknowledge their son suffered from a variety of mental problems, including schizophrenia, and don't deny he struck the man. But they insist Browne didn't attack the man because he was gay. "When the schizophrenia would rise up, it was all about anger, frustration and rage," she said. "But he would have great periods of calm in between."In an oral statement to Albany Detective Michael Nadoraski, Browne allegedly said he'd had a bad day when he hit the victim on Oct. 10. He also said homosexuals "think life is a big joke. "Witnesses said they saw Browne hit the man, then scream for the "faggots" to stop following him as witnesses gave chase, said Albany County District Attorney Paul Clyne. Mary Browne said her son was agitated because he totaled his vehicle in a head-on crash that morning, a week after two of his best friends were killed in a collision. Source: Albany Times Union, August 30, 2004

 

Date: 9/2004

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Glenn Moosnick, a 35-year-old artist struggling with schizophrenia climbed onto the rafters of the Time Warner Center atrium in New York City on September 27, 2004 and leaped to his death as noontime shoppers looked on, police said. Authorities said Moosnick died shortly after the fall at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital. He had been a resident at Fountain House, a group home for the mentally ill on West 47th Street, officials said. Moosnick's sister said her brother had suffered from schizophrenia for 10 years but was recently doing better. She said her brother was on medication and "didn't seem depressed", but had been "suicidal off and on," she said. Source: New York Post, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: Bedford, Westchester, NY

Summary: On August 17, 2002, Jessica Lee Roger, a mentally ill 21-year old inmate, tied a bed sheet around her neck and strangled herself at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility in Bedford, NY. Roger had been confined for 160 days to a "special housing unit" inmates call the "box", an isolation chamber set apart from the general population with a concrete floor, a steel door and no clock. Prison doctors had diagnosed her with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder, among other diagnoses. Prior History: Roger had attempted suicide in the "box" at least four times before she succeeded. After one attempt, she was sent to a prison psychiatric hospital for a month. Although she received a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder and other mental illnesses, Roger was returned to complete her punishment in the "box". Within days, she again attempted suicide. According to her mother, Roger had been in and out of mental hospitals 17 times since she was 11; she had gotten only as far as the fifth grade. When she was 16 years old, just past the threshold to be charged as an adult under New York criminal law, Roger was arrested for biting her sister's arm in a fight. While in custody, she kicked a jail guard and was convicted of second-degree assault of a correction officer. Dutchess County Court Judge George Marlow approved a plea deal to send her to an intensive program for emotionally troubled juveniles. But while she waited in the hospital for a bed to become available, she set fire to a mattress, and Marlow was forced to sentence Roger to 3 1/2 to 7 years in prison. Source: The New York Times Magazine, October 31, 2004

 

Date: 4/2005

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: John Cox, 39-year-old man with a long history of mental illness, died on April 22, 2005 after an altercation with Suffolk County (NY) police, in which he was shocked five times with a Taser. Police had responded to a 911 call made by someone inside Cox's girlfriend's house in Rocky Point, NY after Cox became agitated. One witness said the trouble started because Cox had forgotten to take his medication that day and began raving and punched a wall, but Cox' s brother said he had taken his medication. Suffolk police said that it took nine officers to subdue Cox, and the Taser gun did not affect him. All nine officers were treated and released for minor injuries. Cox, who had alcohol and cocaine in his blood at the time of his death, had been taking Zyprexa for his schizophrenia and acute bipolar mania, said his brother. Prior History: At 20, Cox had his first problem with police, which ended in a conviction for misdemeanor harassment in 1985. By the time he died, he had accumulated 22 convictions, mostly disorderly conduct and harassment. Although he never served more than a month at a time, Cox became a frequent visitor to the Suffolk County jail in Riverhead until the late 1990s. Cox was also often a patient at the Kings Park Psychiatric Center and the Stony Brook University Hospital. His last hospitalization at the Kings Park facility was in early 2005, when he stayed for 30 days, then moved into a halfway house. Source: Long Island Newsday, April 25, 2005; Long Island Newsday, April 30, 2005

 

Date: 3/2001

Location: Fishkill, Dutchess, NY

Summary: Jesse McCann, a 17-year-old boy with mental illness, hanged himself in a New York State prison on March 16, 2001. According to official accounts, McCann was being escorted to the mental health unit at the Downstate Correctional Facility in Fishkill for his medication when he lost control and began shouting obscenities. A corrections officer tried to quiet him, and McCann struck the officer and was placed in the disciplinary housing unit in an isolated cell known as "The Box". Shortly after being placed in the cell, he tied one end of a sheet to the window, the other to his neck and hanged himself. Prior History: McCann was in prison after being sentenced to up to three and half years in state prison for an assault conviction. The year before his death, McCann broke into a house with friends; on the day he got probation for that crime, he stole a wallet from a vehicle. The wallet contained several credit cards, and that made the crime a grand larceny. A later scuffle with a jail guard at the Ulster County Jail turned into the assault charge. Since age 10, Jesse had been in and out of psychiatric hospitals. He was diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder and intermittent explosive disorder. Source: New York Times, December 13, 2004 Poughkeepsie Journal (NY), November 19, 2003 Village Voice, December 23, 2003

 

Date: 10/2009

Location: Wyandanch, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On October 26, 2009, a family dispute turned deadly when Courtney Williams, 30, fatally stabbed his disabled mother and his partially blind stepbrother and also attacked his stepfather. After the rampage at the family's home, police arrested Williams as he walked just blocks away from the house. He was charged with two counts of second-degree murder and one count of second-degree attempted murder. A witness who called 911 at told police Williams stabbed family members after arguing with his stepbrother, Ernest Mobley Jr., 25. Police officials said the younger Mobley's girlfriend was in the house when the violence erupted and she called the authorities. The younger Mobley and his mother, Queen Mobley, 52, were pronounced dead at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip. Ernest Mobley Sr. was taken to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow and was in stable condition with stab wounds later that afternoon, spokeswoman Shelley Lotenberg said. Family members of the victims said Williams was mentally ill and had begun acting erratically after he stopped his medication. Queen Mobley's sister-in-law Barbara Brown of Wyandanch and her sister, Mary Goodbread of Goldsboro, N.C., said Queen Mobley had contacted police on October 24 to report that Williams "was acting out." "They told her that he would have to hurt somebody before they would do anything," said Goodbread, 62. "Now they've got to answer." Suffolk police said they responded Saturday night to a domestic disturbance call. Source: Newsday, 10/27/09

 

Date: 10/2009

Location: Wyandanch, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On October 26, 2009, a family dispute turned deadly when Courtney Williams, 30, fatally stabbed his disabled mother and his partially blind stepbrother and also attacked his stepfather. After the rampage at the family's home, police arrested Williams as he walked just blocks away from the house. He was charged with two counts of second-degree murder and one count of second-degree attempted murder. A witness who called 911 at told police Williams stabbed family members after arguing with his stepbrother, Ernest Mobley Jr., 25. Police officials said the younger Mobley's girlfriend was in the house when the violence erupted and she called the authorities. The younger Mobley and his mother, Queen Mobley, 52, were pronounced dead at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip. Ernest Mobley Sr. was taken to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow and was in stable condition with stab wounds later that afternoon, spokeswoman Shelley Lotenberg said. Family members of the victims said Williams was mentally ill and had begun acting erratically after he stopped his medication. Queen Mobley's sister-in-law Barbara Brown of Wyandanch and her sister, Mary Goodbread of Goldsboro, N.C., said Queen Mobley had contacted police on October 24 to report that Williams "was acting out." "They told her that he would have to hurt somebody before they would do anything," said Goodbread, 62. "Now they've got to answer." Suffolk police said they responded Saturday night to a domestic disturbance call. Source: Newsday, 10/27/09

 

Date: 10/2009

Location: Wyandanch, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On October 26, 2009, a family dispute turned deadly when Courtney Williams, 30, fatally stabbed his disabled mother and his partially blind stepbrother and also attacked his stepfather. After the rampage at the family's home, police arrested Williams as he walked just blocks away from the house. He was charged with two counts of second-degree murder and one count of second-degree attempted murder. A witness who called 911 at told police Williams stabbed family members after arguing with his stepbrother, Ernest Mobley Jr., 25. Police officials said the younger Mobley's girlfriend was in the house when the violence erupted and she called the authorities. The younger Mobley and his mother, Queen Mobley, 52, were pronounced dead at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center in West Islip. Ernest Mobley Sr. was taken to Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow and was in stable condition with stab wounds later that afternoon, spokeswoman Shelley Lotenberg said. Family members of the victims said Williams was mentally ill and had begun acting erratically after he stopped his medication. Queen Mobley's sister-in-law Barbara Brown of Wyandanch and her sister, Mary Goodbread of Goldsboro, N.C., said Queen Mobley had contacted police on October 24 to report that Williams "was acting out." "They told her that he would have to hurt somebody before they would do anything," said Goodbread, 62. "Now they've got to answer." Suffolk police said they responded Saturday night to a domestic disturbance call. Source: Newsday, 10/27/09

 

Date: 12/2009

Location: Queensbury, Warren, NY

Summary: On December 1, 2009, Joanne M. Mattison stabbed her ex-boyfriend, James D. Euber to death at the home he shared with his sister, Becky "Grace" Biggs. Biggs and her roommate were present at the time of the stabbing, and tried to help Euber. Police said Mattison was charged with second-degree murder but would not say what prompted the attack, or where Euber was stabbed. After the incident, Mattison told a reporter that she and Euber argued because he had stolen money from her, Euber’s sister, Cheryl Ross said the family believes Mattison went to the trailer seeking money from Euber because Euber had gotten paid hours earlier from his job as a dishwasher at Panera Bread in Queensbury. The two had argued the day before because Mattison, who was unemployed, wanted Euber to buy her beer but he would not, according to Ross. Police and friends of Mattison, 48, have said she had an extensive history of mental health problems. Her father, John Mattison, said she was diagnosed as bipolar years ago, and has "problems" when she does not take her medication. "When she's on her medication, she's as normal as you and I," he said. "I want to make sure she gets back on her medication." Prior History: A neighbor of the trailer where Mattison killed Euber said Mattison came to his home on the day of the incident to use his phone and she called the FBI to report that Euber had stabbed her with a needle and stolen money from her. The neighbor, who spoke on condition of anonymity out of concern for retribution from police, said Mattison told him that she had been to the Glens Falls Police Department and Warren County Sheriff's Office to make complaints about her "boyfriend," but that neither agency would take her complaint. He said Mattison hung up the phone after the calling the FBI, cursed and said she planned to go to the Warren County District Attorney's Office. It was unclear if she visited the office. Glens Falls Police Capt. Will Valenza said Mattison visited the department to make a complaint at some point the prior week, and after officers wouldn't take her complaint because it was not clear what she was alleging, she visited his office on November 25. City police "had a lot of contact" with her in recent months, he said. "She was mad she wasn't able to make a complaint. She wouldn't say what happened, when it happened or where it happened," Valenza said. "She made no mention of her boyfriend or any man." Mattison did not make any threats against herself or anyone else, and did not mention Euber, Valenza said. Source: Glen Falls Post Star, 12/3/09

 

Date: 7/2009

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On July 30, 2009, Ivy Supersonic, whose real name is Ivy Silberstein, a member of Howard Stern's wack pack, screamed wildly at police as she was loaded into an ambulance outside her luxury Union Square building, witnesses said. Police responded to her apartment after they received a call she was acting erratically and was possibly armed, police sources said. The heavily-tattooed Silberstein, who investigators believe sliced herself in the arm with a knife she's been toting in recent days, was taken to Bellevue Hospital for observation. She was not charged with a crime. Silberstein's removal from the Zeckendorf Towers marked the end of a bizarre 24 hours for the fashion designer, who posted frenzied messages on her Facebook page alleging that Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly was conspiring against her. "Who ever [sic] has a copy of the voice notes file send to FBI," she typed. "UR very smart - send same tapes to Homeland and CIA protect me from Ray Kelly FedEx it to Obama now!!!" Silberstein, 42, posted one last time moments before she surrendered, asking people to call her lawyer. Police sources said Silberstein's doctor called 911 to say that his patient, the daughter of famed attorney Jerome Silberstein, was bipolar and off her medication. Source: New York Daily News, 7/30/09

 

Date: 2/2010

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On February 21, 2010, Satnam Singh, 32, was killed by two police who caught him bashing his mother in the head with a frying pan. Singh refused to drop the pan when the uniformed patrol officers went to his family's Melrose apartment to check on his mother, Kaur Balbir, 61. "Go away! Go away!" Singh screamed at the cops, according to Donovan Howell, super of the building. Howell said he fetched a pass key to Balbir's apartment when the police were unable to get anyone to answer their knock. Through a crack in the chain-locked door, they spotted Singh, who, sources said, was bipolar, pummeling his mother with a flat pan. The police kicked the door down, and Officer Brian McCarthy and an unidentified sergeant fired multiple shots at Singh who died at the scene. Balbir was taken to Lincoln Hospital, where she was in critical condition with a cracked skull, a fractured left shin and a busted left arm. Source: NY Daily News, 2/22/10

 

Date: 12/2011

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On December 4, 2011, 40-year-old Steven Angelides walked into a New York police station saying he was a terrorist and had a plastic bag holding a propane tank rigged to look like a bomb. Angelides said more explosive devices were inside a blue van parked in front of an apartment building owned by Angelides’s family. The bomb squad responded to the building and found the van but no explosives. Angelides’ family told police that he suffered from bipolar disorder and hadn’t taken his medication for at least a week. Source: Wall Street Journal, 12/5/11

 

Date: 2/2011

Location: Auburn, Cayuga, NY

Summary: On February 23, 2011, Peter Harris approached a man at a gas station and asked him for a ride around midnight. When the man refused, Harris shoved him and ripped the fuel door cover off his car. Harris’ victim attempted to run into the store but Harris pursued and attacked his victim both outside and inside the store. Harris smashed out the man’s window, slashed three of his car tires, and threatened him with a knife. Subsequent History: On December 8, 2011, the 32-year-old Harris was sentenced to 3.5 to seven years in prison. On October 26, Harris had been convicted of possessing a knife and using it to threaten a man and to slash the victim's car tires. Harris was also found guilty of physically attacking the victim. Harris’ attorney said his client suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and was not taking his medication at the time of the gas station incident. Source: Auburn Pub, 12/9/11

 

Date: 12/2011

Location: Spring Valley, Rockland, NY

Summary: On December 14, 2011, 48-year-old Herve Gilles was fatally shot after he attacked Spring Valley Police Officer John Roper and took away Roper’s nightstick. Roper responded to the scene where Gilles was throwing rocks at a bar. It was the second time that day that Roper had been called to the bar to deal with Gilles, who had been at the bar screaming unintelligibly about an hour earlier. Gilles’ friends said he was a chronically mentally ill man who could get out of control when drunk or off his medications. Roper was taken to the hospital where he was treated for lacerations and bite marks. Subsequent History: In May 2012, a grand jury found that that Roper was justified in using deadly force against Gilles. Prior History: Gilles had been arrested for criminal offenses 33 times since 1990, including eight felonies, four of which were violent. However, as the D.A. noted in the report, when Gilles wasn't drunk, off his meds, or high on marijuana, he was a great guy who did volunteer work with his church. Source: LoHud.com, 12/15/11; Village Voice, 5/8/12

 

Date: 8/2011

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: On August 22, 2011, 32-year-old Jawain Wilson fatally stabbed 21-year-old Joshua Thomas. The two were working at a Goodwill Industries Store when they got into an argument Subsequent History: On January 5, 2012, a judge sentenced Wilson to 20 years in prison. Wilson’s attorney said his client, diagnosed with Paranoid Schizophrenia, was off his medication at the time of the incident. Source: WKBW.com, 8/22/11, 1/5/12

 

Date: 1/2012

Location: Stony Point, Rockland, NY

Summary: On January 25, 2012, 29-year-old Anthony Copicotto barricaded himself in his apartment prompting a standoff with police. Police responded after a friend alerted them to Facebook postings indicating that Copicotto was emotionally distraught, had weapons, and may pose a threat to himself and others. Copicotto emerged after several hours carrying a Bible and a black pellet gun that resembled a real weapon. He dropped the black Airsoft pellet gun to the ground and surrendered. Copicotto‘s family said he had bipolar disorder and was off his medication at the time of the incident. Three paintball handguns, an additional Airsoft pellet rifle and one rifle resembling an AK-15 also were recovered from Copicotto’s apartment. There were no live firearms. Stony Point police were aware of Copicotto’s mental health conditions. An official said officers had been checking in on him for the past week at the request of his family. Prior History: Copicotto was diagnosed as bipolar in 2008 and had been living with his parents and sister elsewhere in Stony Point, according to his sister. He moved into his own place in October at which time he stopped taking medication that helped control his disorder, his sister said. Source: LoHud.com, 1/25/12

 

Date: 4/2011

Location: Lockport, Niagara, NY

Summary: On April 21, 2011, Hans S. Diefenbach, diagnosed with schizophrenia, stabbed 65-year-old Norma Confer with a pair of knives, leaving one in her back. She died in May 2011 after being in a coma for five weeks. He believed Confer was trying to poison him. Subsequent History: On March 8, 2012, the 47-year-old Diefenbach was sentenced to 10 years in state prison, five years of post release supervision and a $5,000 fine. Diefenbach pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter in December 2011, as part of a plea deal which includes a maximum sentence of 10 years. Diefenbach’s attorney noted that all of the psychiatrists who had evaluated him said he was not competent to stand trial. Source: Niagara Gazette, 3/8/12

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On July 11, 2011, 35-year-old Levi Aron abducted and murdered 8-year-old Leiby Kletzky. Aron confessed to suffocating the boy with a bath towel and then cutting up the body. Aron picked up Leiby while he was walking home from a Borough Park day camp alone for the first time. Police said that even though Leiby had practiced the route, he got lost and approached Aron for help. Aron took the child home and killed him two days later when he panicked after seeing photos of the missing boy on fliers distributed in his neighborhood. The same day, Aron was arrested and confessed to the crime. Leiby’s remains were found in two Brooklyn locations, two and a half miles from each other. Body parts were found in a black plastic garbage bag inside of suitcase in a dumpster and in the refrigerator of the third-floor attic of the home where Aron lived. Subsequently, the Medical Examiner reported that Leiby had been drugged before he was smothered to death, including with a drug used to treat schizophrenia, the medical examiner said. Aron was sent to Bellevue Hospital for a psychiatric evaluation. His lawyers said he hears voices and sees hallucinations. Source: NewYorkDailyNews.com, 7/14/11; ABCNews.com, 7/14/11; MSNBC, 7/20/11; New York Post, 8/11/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On July 22, 2011, 42-year-old Richard Arrocho forced his way into a train driver's compartment on the New York subway and threatened to stab him with a screwdriver. According to witnesses, Arrocho was yelling that somebody was trying to kill him. The train driver said that he opened his window to investigate and Arrocho climbed into the cab when he turned to radio a supervisor. Arrocho threatened the driver and grabbed the controls at one point. One of the passengers managed to film the incident through the window of the driver's compartment. When the train stopped, the driver was able to flee the cab. Passengers assisted the driver in holding Arrocho in the cab until police arrived. Authorities said that Arrocho has a history of mental illness and has spent some time in a psychiatric ward. Also, he has been arrested at least 40 times on a range of charges, from robbery to petty larceny. Source: UK Daily Mail, 7/26/11; CBSNewYork.com, 7/26/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On July 22, 2011, 42-year-old Richard Arrocho forced his way into a train driver's compartment on the New York subway and threatened to stab him with a screwdriver. According to witnesses, Arrocho was yelling that somebody was trying to kill him. The train driver said that he opened his window to investigate and Arrocho climbed into the cab when he turned to radio a supervisor. Arrocho threatened the driver and grabbed the controls at one point. One of the passengers managed to film the incident through the window of the driver's compartment. When the train stopped, the driver was able to flee the cab. Passengers assisted the driver in holding Arrocho in the cab until police arrived. Authorities said that Arrocho has a history of mental illness and has spent some time in a psychiatric ward. Also, he has been arrested at least 40 times on a range of charges, from robbery to petty larceny. Source: UK Daily Mail, 7/26/11; CBSNewYork.com, 7/26/11

 

Date: 12/2009

Location: Vestal, Broome, NY

Summary: On December 4, 2009, 46-year-old Bingham University student Abdulsalam S. al-Zahrani, fatally stabbed 77-year-old Professor Richard T. Antoun in his university office. Professor Antoun, a retired anthropology professor, was a specialist in Islamic and Middle Eastern studies who had worked with Zahrani. Zahrani, a citizen of Saudi Arabia, was a graduate student in anthropology. Zahrani was indicted January 22, 2010 by a grand jury on one felony count of second-degree murder. He pleaded not guilty. Subsequent History: In a July 21, 2010 filing, Abdulsalam S. al-Zahrani’s defense attorney reported he had been suffering from Schizoaffective Disorder for a long time and lacked capacity to know or appreciate the nature and consequences of his conduct. Source: The New York Times, 12/5/09; PressConnects.com, 9/27/10

 

Date: 10/2010

Location: Long Island, Queens, NY

Summary: On October 8, 2010, 23-year-old Evan Sachs crept up behind an 8-year-old boy playing a video game at a restaurant, put a hand on his shoulder and plunged a 4-inch blade into his back five times as witnesses watched in horror. The boy suffered a punctured lung in the assault in a Long Island shopping mall. He was hospitalized in stable condition and expected to recover. After the boy staggered, bleeding, to his mother, his father and a witness to the assault grabbed the suspect as he walked toward a restroom and held him until officers arrived, police said. Neither the child nor his family knew Sachs and they lived in different towns. Subsequent History: Police said Evan Sachs had been hunting for a child to kill for weeks. Sachs' attorney, Charles Rosenblum, told reporters his client has been under psychiatric care and recently had medications changed. Source: MyFoxNY, 10/09/10; CBSNews.com, 10/12/10

 

Date: 10/2010

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: On either October 12 or 13, 2010, 30-year-old Eric Bellucci, diagnosed with Schizophrenia, stabbed his parents to death in their Staten Island Home. Eric’s sister, called police when she went to the house because her parents weren't answering the phone. She opened the door and saw blood before running out and calling 911. Police found the bodies of 61-year-old Arthur Bellucci and 56-year-old Marian Bellucci in the home. After the killings, Bellucci went to Newark Airport where he caught a flight to Israel, where a friend lives. He was captured in Israel on October 15 as he tried to purchase a ticket to China. Following his capture, the delusional Bellucci told authorities that he was there to avenge his parents' deaths and find the Mossad agent who killed them. His sister told police cops her brother was furious because she and her parents were trying to get him help. Prior History: Belluci was diagnosed with Schizophrenia surfaced after college, causing him to be hospitalized twice. He became delusional and violent and often turned his rage on his family. His mental demons worsened in recent months as he refused to take his medication, relatives said. Subsequent History: On July 21, 2011, two state psychiatrists determined the 31-year-old Bellucci was fit for trial. The stunning turnaround came less than three months after a Staten Island justice had found Bellucci mentally incompetent for trial and ordered him sent to a secure psychiatric facility. Subsequently, another psychiatrist found Bellucci unfit to proceed with trial. Subsequent History: On March 9, 2012, a judge set an April 18 hearing date to for a mental competency hearing. Source: New York Daily News, 10/15/10, 10/17/10; New York, CBS 2, 10/19/10; Daily Press (VA), 10/16/10; HealthCentral.com, 10/16/10; NY1, 4/28/11; Staten Island Advance, 5/11/11, 9/9/11; Staten Island Shore, 7/22/11; SI Live, 3/9/12

 

Date: 10/2010

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: On either October 12 or 13, 2010, 30-year-old Eric Bellucci, diagnosed with Schizophrenia, stabbed his parents to death in their Staten Island Home. Eric’s sister, called police when she went to the house because her parents weren't answering the phone. She opened the door and saw blood before running out and calling 911. Police found the bodies of 61-year-old Arthur Bellucci and 56-year-old Marian Bellucci in the home. After the killings, Bellucci went to Newark Airport where he caught a flight to Israel, where a friend lives. He was captured in Israel on October 15 as he tried to purchase a ticket to China. Following his capture, the delusional Bellucci told authorities that he was there to avenge his parents' deaths and find the Mossad agent who killed them. His sister told police cops her brother was furious because she and her parents were trying to get him help. Prior History: Belluci was diagnosed with Schizophrenia surfaced after college, causing him to be hospitalized twice. He became delusional and violent and often turned his rage on his family. His mental demons worsened in recent months as he refused to take his medication, relatives said. Subsequent History: On July 21, 2011, two state psychiatrists determined the 31-year-old Bellucci was fit for trial. The stunning turnaround came less than three months after a Staten Island justice had found Bellucci mentally incompetent for trial and ordered him sent to a secure psychiatric facility. Subsequently, another psychiatrist found Bellucci unfit to proceed with trial. Subsequent History: On March 9, 2012, a judge set an April 18 hearing date to for a mental competency hearing. Source: New York Daily News, 10/15/10, 10/17/10; New York, CBS 2, 10/19/10; Daily Press (VA), 10/16/10; HealthCentral.com, 10/16/10; NY1, 4/28/11; Staten Island Advance, 5/11/11, 9/9/11; Staten Island Shore, 7/22/11; SI Live, 3/9/12

 

Date: 11/2010

Location: Long Island, Queens, NY

Summary: On November 20, 2010, 48-year-old Thomas Scimone, was armed with a shotgun and threatened to kill firefighters was shot by police as he ran from his burning home. He was in critical condition following the incident. A relative said she believed Scimone was not taking his medication for bipolar disorder. The incident began when Scimone set a fire in his living room. Police said he then threatened to gun down responding firefighters. He jumped out of a window and ran through the neighborhood with his shotgun. Police gave chase. He didn’t respond to their commands to drop his weapon, rather turned and pointed the shotgun at police who opened fire. Subsequent History: On November 25, 2010 Scimone, who had been in critical condition following the incident, died at Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center. Source: NY Daily News, 11/21/10; NBCNewYork.com, 11/21/10, 11/26/10

 

Date: 9/2010

Location: Greece, Monroe, NY

Summary: On September 29, 2010, 23-year-old Kurt Neusatz fatally stabbed his mother, 53-year-old Monica Neusatz in their home. When policed arrived, they found Monica’s body in an upstairs bedroom. Kurt was found on the front porch with self-inflicted stab wounds on his neck. His family reported he had been treated for schizophrenia since the age of 17. Subsequent History: On January 4, 2011, a judge ordered Kurt Neusatz to undergo a mental health evaluation to determine if he was competent to stand trial for second-degree murder. Source: 13WHAM.com, 9/30/10; DemocratandChronicle.com, 12/1/10; Associated Press, 1/4/11; GreecePost.com, 1/4/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Utica, Oneida, NY

Summary: On July 19, 2011, 30-year-old David. L. Trebilcock fatally stabbed 6-year-old Lauren Belius, while her twin sister Erica watched. Trebilcock was the live-in boyfriend of Alison Belius, the child's mother. He stabbed himself after he attacked Lauren. Trebilcock barricaded the twins' bedroom door with a dresser during the incident. Alison Belius awoke to her children’s screams and forced her way into the bedroom to find Trebilcock stabbing Lauren. Trebilcock cut his own wrists and stabbed himself in the chest after he attacked the child. Subsequent History: On February 14, 2012, a judge found Trebilcock not criminally responsible for fatally stabbing Lauren due to mental disease or defect. During the trial, a forensic psychiatrist for the defense testified that Trebilcock suffered from paranoid schizophrenia with a poor prognosis. Source: OneidaDispatch.com, 7/21/11; New York, Observer-Dispatch, 2/14/12

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: Utica, Oneida, NY

Summary: On July 19, 2011, 30-year-old David. L. Trebilcock fatally stabbed 6-year-old Lauren Belius, while her twin sister Erica watched. Trebilcock was the live-in boyfriend of Alison Belius, the child's mother. He stabbed himself after he attacked Lauren. Trebilcock barricaded the twins' bedroom door with a dresser during the incident. Alison Belius awoke to her children’s screams and forced her way into the bedroom to find Trebilcock stabbing Lauren. Trebilcock cut his own wrists and stabbed himself in the chest after he attacked the child. Subsequent History: On February 14, 2012, a judge found Trebilcock not criminally responsible for fatally stabbing Lauren due to mental disease or defect. During the trial, a forensic psychiatrist for the defense testified that Trebilcock suffered from paranoid schizophrenia with a poor prognosis. Source: OneidaDispatch.com, 7/21/11; New York, Observer-Dispatch, 2/14/12

 

Date: 4/2012

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On April 8, 2012, 24-year-old Bennedy Abreu attacked Police Officer William Fair and Officer Phillip White with a knife. Fair was cut in the neck, jaw, nose and lip. He needed 15 stitches to close his wounds. White's wrist was wounded during the incident. Abreu, who had a history of severe mental illness and violence, was not taking his medication. Prior History: Abreu’s family said he suffered from schizophrenia and should not have been taken off his medication. The family said they became concerned in April 2011, when Abreu stopped receiving court-ordered treatment for his illness. It was then, they said, that doctors at North Central Bronx Hospital told them that Abreu no longer needed medication. They said Abreu’s behavior had become more erratic over the past year. In January, they checked him in for treatment at North Central Bronx Hospital. He was released in 10 days. The family said, upon his release, Abreu's behavior had not changed from before he was checked in. Source: New York Daily News, 4/13/12, 4/16/12; The Riverdale Press, 04/18/12

 

Date: 4/2012

Location: Harlem, Manhattan, NY

Summary: On April 17, 2012, 26-year-old Terrance Hale, who had stopped taking his psychotropic medications a month before, stabbed 28-year-old Officer Eder Loor in the skull with a knife. The knife pierced Loor’s skull and went into his brain. Loor had responded to Hale’s mother’s 911 call asking police to take Hale, who was acting irrationally, to the hospital. Loor was in critical but stable condition after the attack. Hale’s mother said he had been diagnosed 10 years before with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression. Hale, who attacked Loor without warning in the lobby of his building, was arrested at the scene. Prior History: In October 2010, police were called to Hale’s home on a report that he was suicidal. At that time, he was hospitalized without a confrontation. Hale had a criminal history including a 2006 stabbing, along with arrests for robbery, assault and riot, authorities said. Subsequent History: On May 17, 2012, Hale’s attorney entered a plea of not guilty to attempted murder, assault upon a police officer and criminal possession of a weapon, during Hale’s arraignment. Source: New York Daily News, 4/18/12 (3 articles); New York Post, 5/17/12

 

Date: 4/2012

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On April 8, 2012, 24-year-old Bennedy Abreu attacked Police Officer William Fair and Officer Phillip White with a knife. Fair was cut in the neck, jaw, nose and lip. He needed 15 stitches to close his wounds. White's wrist was wounded during the incident. Abreu, who had a history of severe mental illness and violence, was not taking his medication. Prior History: Abreu’s family said he suffered from schizophrenia and should not have been taken off his medication. The family said they became concerned in April 2011, when Abreu stopped receiving court-ordered treatment for his illness. It was then, they said, that doctors at North Central Bronx Hospital told them that Abreu no longer needed medication. They said Abreu’s behavior had become more erratic over the past year. In January, they checked him in for treatment at North Central Bronx Hospital. He was released in 10 days. The family said, upon his release, Abreu's behavior had not changed from before he was checked in. Source: New York Daily News, 4/13/12, 4/16/12; The Riverdale Press, 04/18/12

 

Date: 4/2010

Location: West Seneca, Erie, NY

Summary: On April 25, 2010, 56-year-old Jerome Brylski, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, initiated a shoot out with police. The incident began when family members contacted Crisis Services to alert them to the danger they felt was imminent. But before the counselors could talk to him, Brylski was on his way to a shootout with police. West Seneca Police Chief Edward F. Gehen Jr. said dispatchers got a call saying Brylski “had a gun that would shoot through five police officers, and he was acting irrationally.” Officers met up with Crisis Services counselors to coordinate a plan. In the meantime, Brylski called two friends, Jeffrey Edwards and Dianna Dangelo, to come over. When they pulled into his driveway, he got into their car. As Crisis Services counselors were on their way to Brylski’s house, West Seneca police pulled over the car he was riding in. Brylski jumped out of the back seat, police said, and opened fire with a rifle on the four officers at the scene. Brylski and Edwards, who drove the car, both were struck at least twice and were taken to Erie County Medical Center, the chief said. Brylski was listed in stable condition, with at least one wound to the torso. Edwards’ condition was more serious, authorities said, as he was struck in the neck. The police officers were not wounded. Brylski was charged with four counts of first-degree attempted murder, authorities said. Prior History: For years, Jerome Brylski had managed to function, despite the mental illness that seemed to transform everyday events into what he believed was further evidence of a government conspiracy against him. His grown children said they had been trying for more than a year to get authorities to intervene and get their father the help he needed for his paranoid schizophrenia. “This could have been prevented, had the system not failed me and my family. It took something that escalated into a shootout to get someone to listen,” one of his daughters said. “We begged the courts to get him a mental health evaluation. They never pursued it. He never went.” Brylski had gotten into a number of scrapes with police within the past year, his children said, and at each point along the way, his family tried to get him the help he needed. They said the system failed, and Brylski just got sicker, refusing medication and counseling. At one point last year, his family had him committed to a psychiatric ward. He got out less than two weeks later and wasn’t taking his medication. Months later, a West Seneca judge ordered him to under-go a mental health evaluation. Brylski never got one, relatives said, and the court did not push the issue. In recent weeks, he had taken to sleeping with a gun next to his bed. He sent out countless e-mails, text messages and faxes, complaining of the conspiracy against him. Source: Buffalo News, 4/27/10

 

Date: 4/2010

Location: West Seneca, Erie, NY

Summary: On April 25, 2010, 56-year-old Jerome Brylski, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, initiated a shoot out with police. The incident began when family members contacted Crisis Services to alert them to the danger they felt was imminent. But before the counselors could talk to him, Brylski was on his way to a shootout with police. West Seneca Police Chief Edward F. Gehen Jr. said dispatchers got a call saying Brylski “had a gun that would shoot through five police officers, and he was acting irrationally.” Officers met up with Crisis Services counselors to coordinate a plan. In the meantime, Brylski called two friends, Jeffrey Edwards and Dianna Dangelo, to come over. When they pulled into his driveway, he got into their car. As Crisis Services counselors were on their way to Brylski’s house, West Seneca police pulled over the car he was riding in. Brylski jumped out of the back seat, police said, and opened fire with a rifle on the four officers at the scene. Brylski and Edwards, who drove the car, both were struck at least twice and were taken to Erie County Medical Center, the chief said. Brylski was listed in stable condition, with at least one wound to the torso. Edwards’ condition was more serious, authorities said, as he was struck in the neck. The police officers were not wounded. Brylski was charged with four counts of first-degree attempted murder, authorities said. Prior History: For years, Jerome Brylski had managed to function, despite the mental illness that seemed to transform everyday events into what he believed was further evidence of a government conspiracy against him. His grown children said they had been trying for more than a year to get authorities to intervene and get their father the help he needed for his paranoid schizophrenia. “This could have been prevented, had the system not failed me and my family. It took something that escalated into a shootout to get someone to listen,” one of his daughters said. “We begged the courts to get him a mental health evaluation. They never pursued it. He never went.” Brylski had gotten into a number of scrapes with police within the past year, his children said, and at each point along the way, his family tried to get him the help he needed. They said the system failed, and Brylski just got sicker, refusing medication and counseling. At one point last year, his family had him committed to a psychiatric ward. He got out less than two weeks later and wasn’t taking his medication. Months later, a West Seneca judge ordered him to under-go a mental health evaluation. Brylski never got one, relatives said, and the court did not push the issue. In recent weeks, he had taken to sleeping with a gun next to his bed. He sent out countless e-mails, text messages and faxes, complaining of the conspiracy against him. Source: Buffalo News, 4/27/10

 

Date: 4/2010

Location: West Seneca, Erie, NY

Summary: On April 25, 2010, 56-year-old Jerome Brylski, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, initiated a shoot out with police. The incident began when family members contacted Crisis Services to alert them to the danger they felt was imminent. But before the counselors could talk to him, Brylski was on his way to a shootout with police. West Seneca Police Chief Edward F. Gehen Jr. said dispatchers got a call saying Brylski “had a gun that would shoot through five police officers, and he was acting irrationally.” Officers met up with Crisis Services counselors to coordinate a plan. In the meantime, Brylski called two friends, Jeffrey Edwards and Dianna Dangelo, to come over. When they pulled into his driveway, he got into their car. As Crisis Services counselors were on their way to Brylski’s house, West Seneca police pulled over the car he was riding in. Brylski jumped out of the back seat, police said, and opened fire with a rifle on the four officers at the scene. Brylski and Edwards, who drove the car, both were struck at least twice and were taken to Erie County Medical Center, the chief said. Brylski was listed in stable condition, with at least one wound to the torso. Edwards’ condition was more serious, authorities said, as he was struck in the neck. The police officers were not wounded. Brylski was charged with four counts of first-degree attempted murder, authorities said. Prior History: For years, Jerome Brylski had managed to function, despite the mental illness that seemed to transform everyday events into what he believed was further evidence of a government conspiracy against him. His grown children said they had been trying for more than a year to get authorities to intervene and get their father the help he needed for his paranoid schizophrenia. “This could have been prevented, had the system not failed me and my family. It took something that escalated into a shootout to get someone to listen,” one of his daughters said. “We begged the courts to get him a mental health evaluation. They never pursued it. He never went.” Brylski had gotten into a number of scrapes with police within the past year, his children said, and at each point along the way, his family tried to get him the help he needed. They said the system failed, and Brylski just got sicker, refusing medication and counseling. At one point last year, his family had him committed to a psychiatric ward. He got out less than two weeks later and wasn’t taking his medication. Months later, a West Seneca judge ordered him to under-go a mental health evaluation. Brylski never got one, relatives said, and the court did not push the issue. In recent weeks, he had taken to sleeping with a gun next to his bed. He sent out countless e-mails, text messages and faxes, complaining of the conspiracy against him. Source: Buffalo News, 4/27/10

 

Date: 11/2010

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On November 23, 2010, 31-year-old Michael Brea killed his mother 55-year-old Yannick Brea with a samurai sword after a fight. Brea lived with his mother and twin brother in the Brooklyn apartment where the incident occurred. Neighbors and relatives said Brea was a "quiet man" who admired his mother. Brea, a Haitian American actor who had small roles in ABC's show "Ugly Betty" and the movie "Step Up 3D," was also a local businessman who had given away free turkeys on Thanksgiving at his Subway sandwich franchise in Brooklyn. However the parent company took his franchise away for poor performance and management issues. Subsequent History: On April 27, 2012, Brea pleaded not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect to his mother’s death after psychiatrists for both sides diagnosed him with schizophrenia. Prosecutors said Brea would be sent to a mental health facility, likely either Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan or Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center in upstate New York. Source: CBSNews.com, 11/24/10; Patch.com, 5/3/12

 

Date: 12/2010

Location: Auburn, Cayuga, NY

Summary: On December 18, 2010, 42-year-old Darrell McClain stabbed his neighbor, 46-year-old David Fordyce, repeatedly after Fordyce asked him to stop yelling in the hallway. McClain was arrested at the scene. Fordyce was taken to the hospital, where he was treated and released. Police said the fight began the day before the alleged assault when Fordyce accused McClain of stealing $50 from him. Police said although Fordyce allegedly threatened to hurt McClain with a shotgun, a gun was never brandished. Officers responded to the verbal dispute that day and warned the men to stay away from each other. But instead, the argument escalated. McClain's attorney said his client had a history of paranoid schizophrenia and alcohol abuse. Subsequent History: On May 15, 2012, McClain pleaded guilty to second-degree attempted murder, first-degree attempted assault, and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon in exchange for a promised sentence of no more than 12 years in prison. Source: Syracuse.com, 12/19/10; The Citizen, 5/15/12

 

Date: 6/2012

Location: Huntington, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On June 16, 2012, 28-year-old Matthew Hubrins, who had a history of mental illness, fatally stabbed his stepfather, 44-year-old Noel Mohammed. Source: LongIslandPress.com, 6/16/12; New York Post, 6/18/12

 

Date: 3/2012

Location: Jamaica, Queens, NY

Summary: On March 15, 2012, 30-year-old Shereese Francis died after a confrontation with police. The incident began when Francis’ family called for assistance to get her to the hospital. Francis, who wasn't taking the medication prescribed for her schizophrenia, had become emotionally distraught. Before an ambulance arrived, four police officers responded to the call. They chased Francis through the house, ultimately cornering her in a basement bedroom, forcing her face-down on the bed and applying pressure while they cuffed her. Within 20 minutes of police arriving, Francis had stopped breathing. A few hours later she was taken to Jamaica Hospital, where she was pronounced dead. Subsequent History: On March 21, 2012, Francis’ family filed a Freedom of Information request with the NYPD for relevant police records. The police delayed and then denied the Francises’ subsequent appeal. In June, the Francis family formally appealed the NYPD's Freedom of Information denial in state court. The family accused police of excessive force and suffocating Francis. Source: Gothamist.com, 4/3/12; Village Voice, 6/26/12

 

Date: 7/2012

Location: Jamaica, Queens, NY

Summary: On July 4, 2012, Edgar Owens stabbed MTA Police Officer John Barnett in the eye. Barnett fatally shot Owens during the attack. Owens had a history of violence and arrests dating back to 1991 and was classified as an emotionally disturbed person. He had been sent to Rikers Island twice and later to a state hospital. Source: New York Daily News, 7/6/12

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: Elbridge, Onondaga, NY

Summary: On July 20, 2008, Joseph Bisesi III, a seriously mentally ill man, shot and killed his parents, JoEllen and Joseph Bisesi Jr. in their Elbridge home. Shortly after state police discovered the victims' bodies on July 22, Bisesi showed up at the Onondaga County Sheriff's Office in downtown Syracuse to turn himself in. Bisesi immediately told authorities what he had done, asking them to contact "military intelligence" for him. For the next four and a half hours, Bisesi told authorities of killing the victims with shots from a .22-caliber rifle and a 12-gauge shotgun and disposing of their bodies in the septic tank, using a saw to dismember his father's remains. Subsequent History: On November 24, 2008, Joseph Bisesi III, 27, stood in court and admitted without any show of emotion that he shot and killed JoEllen and Joseph Bisesi Jr. in their Elbridge home in July. To the outside world, they were his parents. But in Bisesi's world, they were "Admiral Young" and "Mrs. Kelly," a couple masquerading as his parents after his real parents were murdered by organized crime when he was kidnapped as a child. Doctors who examined Bisesi for the defense and prosecution agreed he was acting under those delusions and that he was seriously mentally ill at the time he killed his parents on July 20. Defense lawyer Randi Bianco said Bisesi still believed that he was an undercover operative carrying out CIA orders to kill the victims before they could kill him. He does not believe they were his parents, she said. Bisesi faced the prospect of spending the rest of his life in a state psychiatric facility after disposing of the murder case under the state's insanity law. Bisesi pleaded "not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect" to charges he murdered his parents by shooting them multiple times and then disposing of their bodies in the septic tank at their home. Onondaga County Judge Anthony Aloi ordered Bisesi placed in the custody of the state Office of Mental Health for a psychiatric evaluation to determine if he was still mentally ill and, if so, if he was dangerous, which could keep Bisesi in the custody of mental health officials for the rest of his life with periodic reviews by the court. Bianco said Bisesi was now likely to get the help his parents had been trying unsuccessfully to get for him before they were killed. Despite their son's increasingly paranoid behavior, his parents apparently never feared for their lives, he said. The prosecutor, Chief Assistant District Attorney Christine Garvey, told Aloi that Dr. Thomas Lazzaro, a psychologist who examined Bisesi for the defense, had concluded Bisesi suffered from a delusional disorder. Dr. James Knoll, a psychiatrist who examined Bisesi for the prosecution, concluded he suffered from paranoid schizophrenia, she said. Both doctors agreed Bisesi suffered from Capgras syndrome, a somewhat rare psychiatric disorder in which the patient comes to believe people close to him or her are imposters, the prosecutor told Aloi. Garvey said the evidence indicated Bisesi clearly believed his parents were imposters, that he was working as an undercover federal marshal to investigate crime in the area and that he needed to kill the couple to get back his real identity. Garvey also noted Bisesi's condition seemed to be linked to an incident that occurred April 17, 2005, in which he was the innocent victim of an assault during a bar fight in Baldwinsville. Bisesi suffered a head injury and a shattered jaw when he was struck with a baton, the prosecutor said. Shortly after that assault, according to Bisesi's family and friends, Bisesi started having hallucinations, hearing voices and believing he had multiple identities and a chip placed in his head by the FBI, Garvey told Aloi. Given all of that evidence, the prosecution would not be able to overcome the insanity defense, she admitted. Earlier this year, Bisesi started focusing more on his delusion about the victims being imposters, but the parents never feared he would harm them, Bianco said. One hour before Bisesi killed his parents, he phoned a relative about having received two cell phone calls from the CIA directing him to kill the couple before they killed him, Bianco said. Because the family had gotten used to that being part of Bisesi's typical "ramblings," the relative did not take the call seriously, the defense lawyer said. Bisesi read from a prepared document. He told the judge about the imposter parents and that he was acting under CIA orders to kill them. He also said he had "interrogated" the couple and gotten them to confess to being imposters shortly before he shot them. Source: Syracuse Post Standard, 11/25/08

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: Elbridge, Onondaga, NY

Summary: On July 20, 2008, Joseph Bisesi III, a seriously mentally ill man, shot and killed his parents, JoEllen and Joseph Bisesi Jr. in their Elbridge home. Shortly after state police discovered the victims' bodies on July 22, Bisesi showed up at the Onondaga County Sheriff's Office in downtown Syracuse to turn himself in. Bisesi immediately told authorities what he had done, asking them to contact "military intelligence" for him. For the next four and a half hours, Bisesi told authorities of killing the victims with shots from a .22-caliber rifle and a 12-gauge shotgun and disposing of their bodies in the septic tank, using a saw to dismember his father's remains. Subsequent History: On November 24, 2008, Joseph Bisesi III, 27, stood in court and admitted without any show of emotion that he shot and killed JoEllen and Joseph Bisesi Jr. in their Elbridge home in July. To the outside world, they were his parents. But in Bisesi's world, they were "Admiral Young" and "Mrs. Kelly," a couple masquerading as his parents after his real parents were murdered by organized crime when he was kidnapped as a child. Doctors who examined Bisesi for the defense and prosecution agreed he was acting under those delusions and that he was seriously mentally ill at the time he killed his parents on July 20. Defense lawyer Randi Bianco said Bisesi still believed that he was an undercover operative carrying out CIA orders to kill the victims before they could kill him. He does not believe they were his parents, she said. Bisesi faced the prospect of spending the rest of his life in a state psychiatric facility after disposing of the murder case under the state's insanity law. Bisesi pleaded "not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect" to charges he murdered his parents by shooting them multiple times and then disposing of their bodies in the septic tank at their home. Onondaga County Judge Anthony Aloi ordered Bisesi placed in the custody of the state Office of Mental Health for a psychiatric evaluation to determine if he was still mentally ill and, if so, if he was dangerous, which could keep Bisesi in the custody of mental health officials for the rest of his life with periodic reviews by the court. Bianco said Bisesi was now likely to get the help his parents had been trying unsuccessfully to get for him before they were killed. Despite their son's increasingly paranoid behavior, his parents apparently never feared for their lives, he said. The prosecutor, Chief Assistant District Attorney Christine Garvey, told Aloi that Dr. Thomas Lazzaro, a psychologist who examined Bisesi for the defense, had concluded Bisesi suffered from a delusional disorder. Dr. James Knoll, a psychiatrist who examined Bisesi for the prosecution, concluded he suffered from paranoid schizophrenia, she said. Both doctors agreed Bisesi suffered from Capgras syndrome, a somewhat rare psychiatric disorder in which the patient comes to believe people close to him or her are imposters, the prosecutor told Aloi. Garvey said the evidence indicated Bisesi clearly believed his parents were imposters, that he was working as an undercover federal marshal to investigate crime in the area and that he needed to kill the couple to get back his real identity. Garvey also noted Bisesi's condition seemed to be linked to an incident that occurred April 17, 2005, in which he was the innocent victim of an assault during a bar fight in Baldwinsville. Bisesi suffered a head injury and a shattered jaw when he was struck with a baton, the prosecutor said. Shortly after that assault, according to Bisesi's family and friends, Bisesi started having hallucinations, hearing voices and believing he had multiple identities and a chip placed in his head by the FBI, Garvey told Aloi. Given all of that evidence, the prosecution would not be able to overcome the insanity defense, she admitted. Earlier this year, Bisesi started focusing more on his delusion about the victims being imposters, but the parents never feared he would harm them, Bianco said. One hour before Bisesi killed his parents, he phoned a relative about having received two cell phone calls from the CIA directing him to kill the couple before they killed him, Bianco said. Because the family had gotten used to that being part of Bisesi's typical "ramblings," the relative did not take the call seriously, the defense lawyer said. Bisesi read from a prepared document. He told the judge about the imposter parents and that he was acting under CIA orders to kill them. He also said he had "interrogated" the couple and gotten them to confess to being imposters shortly before he shot them. Source: Syracuse Post Standard, 11/25/08

 

Date: 0/2002

Location: Pleasantville, Westchester, NY

Summary: On January 14, 2009, 39-year-old Sheila Davalloo, already doing 25 years in the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility for trying to stab her husband to death pleaded not guilty in the stabbing death of her former co-worker, whom police described as her love rival. She was charged in November with murder in the brutal stabbing death of her co-worker, Anna-Lisa Raymundo, in 2002. The suspect and the victim were dating the same man. Davalloo did not become a suspect in that slaying until after her conviction and sentencing in 2004 on an attempted murder charge. Davalloo twice stabbed her husband in the chest in Pleasantville during a game in which they took turns blindfolding each other. She drove her wounded husband, Paul Christos, to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla and stabbed him again after she parked. Davalloo has been getting treatment in prison for bipolar disorder. Source: Lower Hudson Journal News (NY), 1/15/09

 

Date: 1/2009

Location: Westmoreland, Oneida, NY

Summary: On January 19, 2009, Ryan Peeler, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, allegedly beat his mother, Rhonda M. DuPont, 51, to death in his room at the Gallopin' Acres Motel in Westmoreland. The deadly attack erupted shortly after DuPont and her fiancé, William Griffith, 60, stopped by her son’s apartment to bring him food. Moments after Griffith broke into Peeler’s apartment and witnessed the tail end of the beating, he went to the motel office to contact authorities. Peeler then came out of his apartment and asked a nearby neighbor for a ride to Oneida. A long the way, however, Peeler asked to be dropped off on Main Street in the city of Sherrill, investigators said. After Peeler exited the vehicle, the neighbor drove to the Sherrill Police Department, and police from multiple agencies spent about two hours searching for Peeler. Peeler eventually was taken into custody shortly before 9 p.m. when sheriff’s Deputy Mark Ammann saw him walking down Park Avenue in Sherrill. He was questioned by sheriff’s investigators and charged with felony second-degree assault because his mother still was alive at that point. Once DuPont’s brain activity ceased the next morning, Peeler was charged with murder. Prior History: According to Griffith’s statement to sheriff’s investigators, Peeler, 27, had become more violent and erratic as his mental state deteriorated late last year. Roughly three or four years ago, Peeler was hospitalized at Faxton-St. Luke’s Healthcare for mental issues, Griffith said. Peeler was then hospitalized at St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Utica as more incidents followed. That’s when Peeler was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia. Subsequent History: On January 20, 2009, Ryan Peeler was arraigned on a second-degree murder charge. Because Peeler appeared to have a history of mental illness, Village Court Justice Christopher Clarkin ordered Peeler to undergo a psychiatric examination before he returned to court. He was taken to Oneida County jail, where he remained without bail. Subseqent History: On February 12, 2009, Ryan Peeler was transferred to a downstate mental hospital after a judge ruled he does not understand the charges he faces. Peeler, who faces a second-degree murder charge in the January 19 beating death of his mother, Rhonda DuPont, 51, was taken to Mid-Hudson Psychiatric Facility in New Hampton, 70 miles north of New York City, said Frank Nebush Jr., chief public defender in Oneida County. Village of Oriskany Court Justice Christopher Clarkin issued a temporary commitment order last week directing that Peeler be taken to the facility from Oneida County jail, Oneida County First District Attorney Michael Coluzza said. Two psychiatrists separately interviewed Peeler at the jail, where he's been on a 24-hour suicide watch. Their evaluation focused only on whether Peeler understands the nature of the charges he faces and whether he can assist his attorney in preparing his defense. The psychiatrists' report to Clarkin did not address Peeler's mental state at the time he is alleged to have killed DuPont. Peeler will be treated at the psychiatric facility and will return to Oneida County Court to face the criminal charges if new tests determine he is competent. At the time of the killing, Peeler had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and had been living at a Westmoreland motel, police and relatives have said. The night she was slain, DuPont had gone to Peeler's motel room to deliver dinner. Peeler attacked DuPont because he believed that her feet were sucking oxygen from the room, Nebush said. Source: Utica Observer Dispatch, 1/20/09, 1/22/09, 1/26/09, 2/18/09, 2/24/09, 5/22/09; Syracuse Post Standard, 1/21/09

 

Date: 5/2008

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: On May 1, 2008, John W. Sterling III stabbed a policeman in the arm who was responding to a 9-11 call from Sterling’s mother. Officer Robert Osipovitch was stabbed after Rural/Metro personnel and police went to Sterling's home on a call that Sterling, who lived there with his mother, was having severe emotional problems. Sterling argued with police officers and emergency medical technicians and refused to remove his right hand from his pocket. When Sterling walked at Osipovitch and refused to stop, Osipovitch used pepper spray to subdue him. Sterling pulled out a knife, rushed at Osipovitch and stabbed him, police said. Police said Osipovitch was spared further wounds by his bulletproof vest and actions by EMT Brandon McCaughey, who pulled the knife from Sterling's hand as Sterling and Osipovitch scuffled. Subsequent History: On February 5, 2009, Judge Richard A. Keenan ordered John W. Sterling III to prison for the maximum term of seven years for second-degree assault for stabbing Officer Robert Osipovitch in the arm. After the mother of John W. Sterling III called 911 for help with her agitated son, who had a history of schizophrenia, police failed to send a team that deals with the mentally ill and had been to Sterling's home previously, said Assistant Public Defender Joshua Stubbe. Stubbe said Osipovitch hastily entered Sterling's home without talking to a Rural/Metro Medical Service team that had called for police help in calming Sterling. On the other hand, Keenan blamed Sterling for creating the dangerous situation. The courtroom was packed with about 75 colleagues of Osipovitch. So many police officers attended that the judge moved the proceeding to a larger courtroom to accommodate the crowd. Before sentence was imposed, Sterling apologized for the stabbing and said he had not been taking medication for his illness. Prior History: During a trial in December, jurors acquitted Sterling, 29, of attempted aggravated murder of a police officer but convicted him of two counts of second-degree assault. Although the jury couldn't decide on a charge of attempted aggravated assault on a police officer, he'll be retried on that charge in June and could receive a prison term of 20 years, said Assistant District Attorney Matthew Schwartz. Source: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. 2/6/09

 

Date: 2/2009

Location: East Harlem, New York, NY

Summary: On February 16, 2009, 14-month-old Heshesh Brent was reunited with his mother after he had been missing for nearly 24 hours from his mother's East Harlem apartment. A few hours later, after being questioned by detectives, 18-year-old Niasia Hicks was led away from the 25th precinct in handcuffs. She faces charges of kidnapping and endangering the welfare of a child. Hicks had asked to watch the 14-month-old baby, according to his grandmother, Yaya Brent. Hicks' mother told NY1 that the 18-year-old suffers from schizophrenia and had been off her medications for the last six months. She also said Hicks, who is pregnant, loves kids and would never hurt one. She says her daughter lost track of how late it had gotten and unknowingly created a crisis. Both families tell NY1 that Hicks had watched Brents' children on several occasions. The Hicks family says this was all a mistake and that Niasia "needs to be in the hospital, not central booking." Source: NY1.com, 2/17/09

 

Date: 1/2009

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: On January 31, 2009, 14 year-old Tyquan Rivera allegedly shot Officer Anthony DiPonzio in the back of the head on Dayton Street. DiPonzio had brain surgery and faces a long recovery. Tyquan Rivera's mother said her son is not a "monster" and does not have a violent history. Wanda Lise wiped away tears inside the courtroom where Tyquan Rivera was arraigned on attempted murder and assault charges. He pleaded not guilty and will be held at a youth detention facility without bail. Tyquan turns 15 years old on February 18. Prior History: Wanda Lise said Tyquan was severely burned when he was 5 years old. Calling the injury "traumatic," Lise said he had skin grafts on his arm and hand. Lise said a doctor diagnosed Tyquan as being bipolar, but he would not take medication. Lise said she filed a Person in Need of Supervision (PINS) petition on her son, a form of youth probation. She said Tyquan spent about a year at St. Joseph’s Villa, a facility for troubled youths, before running away. Tyquan’s mother said he does not have a violent history. She said Tyquan did not know police were searching for him for several days before he turned himself in. She does not believe he is guilty. Source: 13WHAM.com, 2/18/09

 

Date: 10/2008

Location: White Plains, Westchester, NY

Summary: On October 19, 2008, 37-year-old Sheldene Campbell intentionally drove her vehicle into 65-year-old Marie Bucci killing the older woman. Moments earlier, Campbell had struck 45-year-old Roseanne Schiavone who was walking her dog on the same road, injuring Schiavone and her pet. Campbell sped off after hitting the women. When Campbell was taken into custody, she told police that her brother and father had been in the car and that she had not been driving. Later, she told detectives that she'd lied to police on the street and that she had been driving and hit two people. Campbell told a detective that she had suffered a nervous breakdown and a miscarriage. Prior History: Two weeks before her arrest in White Plains, Campbell spent a week under observation in a New Jersey hospital after she was arrested by Woodcliff Lakes, NJ police. In that incident, she drove onto a lawn, almost hitting a jogger, and assaulted a police officer while her 3-year-old daughter sat in the car without a seat belt. The incident began when she left her 10-year-old son in a McDonald's restaurant. Even though she saw him go into the restaurant, she became convinced that he had been kidnapped, pushed her mother out of the car, and drove off to find him. She and was found on the Garden State Parkway, "babbling incoherently" with her 3-year-old daughter in the back seat. Campbell's lawyer said that in the weeks between her arrests in New Jersey and White Plains, she began hearing voices and having religious hallucinations but refused to take psychiatric medication because she was in denial about her illness. Subsequent History: On March 6, 2009, a Westchester grand jury indicted Campbell with felony counts of second-degree murder and attempted murder, first-degree attempted assault and leaving the scene, and misdemeanor charges of leaving the scene and third-degree assault. Campbell’s attorney said she had been at the county jail since her arrest and was being medicated and treated for catatonic schizophrenia. Subsequent History: On December 19, 2011, the 40-year-old Campbell was found guilty of murder and all other charges brought against her for her 2008 driving rampage. Source: Lower Hudson Journal News, 3/7/09, 3/12/09, 7/30/09; LoHud.com, 11/29/11, 12/20/11

 

Date: 10/2008

Location: White Plains, Westchester, NY

Summary: On October 19, 2008, 37-year-old Sheldene Campbell intentionally drove her vehicle into 65-year-old Marie Bucci killing the older woman. Moments earlier, Campbell had struck 45-year-old Roseanne Schiavone who was walking her dog on the same road, injuring Schiavone and her pet. Campbell sped off after hitting the women. When Campbell was taken into custody, she told police that her brother and father had been in the car and that she had not been driving. Later, she told detectives that she'd lied to police on the street and that she had been driving and hit two people. Campbell told a detective that she had suffered a nervous breakdown and a miscarriage. Prior History: Two weeks before her arrest in White Plains, Campbell spent a week under observation in a New Jersey hospital after she was arrested by Woodcliff Lakes, NJ police. In that incident, she drove onto a lawn, almost hitting a jogger, and assaulted a police officer while her 3-year-old daughter sat in the car without a seat belt. The incident began when she left her 10-year-old son in a McDonald's restaurant. Even though she saw him go into the restaurant, she became convinced that he had been kidnapped, pushed her mother out of the car, and drove off to find him. She and was found on the Garden State Parkway, "babbling incoherently" with her 3-year-old daughter in the back seat. Campbell's lawyer said that in the weeks between her arrests in New Jersey and White Plains, she began hearing voices and having religious hallucinations but refused to take psychiatric medication because she was in denial about her illness. Subsequent History: On March 6, 2009, a Westchester grand jury indicted Campbell with felony counts of second-degree murder and attempted murder, first-degree attempted assault and leaving the scene, and misdemeanor charges of leaving the scene and third-degree assault. Campbell’s attorney said she had been at the county jail since her arrest and was being medicated and treated for catatonic schizophrenia. Subsequent History: On December 19, 2011, the 40-year-old Campbell was found guilty of murder and all other charges brought against her for her 2008 driving rampage. Source: Lower Hudson Journal News, 3/7/09, 3/12/09, 7/30/09; LoHud.com, 11/29/11, 12/20/11

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On April 27, 2009, Ex-Nets star Jayson Williams became 'suicidal' at Manhattan hotel and was tasered by NYPD police. When police arrived at the hotel, they found a suicidal and violent Williams along with empty bottles of two psychiatric drugs that could have exacerbated his mental illness if taken together. Two sources said the ex-NBA star had bottles for Celexa, an anti-depressant, and lithium, used for manic-depression - along with the sleeping pill Ambien, human growth hormone and two other drugs. Williams, 41, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder in the runup to his 2004 trial for fatally shooting his chauffeur. It's unclear how many pills he took before the incident at the Hilton Embassy Suites in Battery Park City. But doctors at St. Vincent's Hospital Manhattan - where he was recovering - told relatives a combination of Celexa and lithium could have made the former Net's mood swings turn frighteningly violent. While recovering at St. Vincent's, Williams was put on the mood stabilizer Depakote, which is used to get bipolar patients out of the manic phase of their illness. Source: New York Daily News, 4/29/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: Binghamton, Broome, NY

Summary: On April 3, 2009, Jiverly Wong barricaded the back door of a community center with his car and then opened fire on a room full of immigrants taking a citizenship class, killing 13 people before committing suicide, officials said. The attack came just after 10 a.m. at the American Civic Association, an organization that helps immigrants settle in this country. Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said Wong parked his car against the back door, "making sure nobody could escape," then stormed through the front, shooting two receptionists, apparently without a word. He then calmly walked in the front door with two handguns. Sources say he was carrying a satchel with extra ammo, a large knife, a flashlight and what appeared to be survival gear - a sign that he was prepared for a standoff. One receptionist was killed, while the other, shot in the abdomen, pretended to be dead and then crawled under a desk and called 911, Police Chief Joseph Zikuski said. The rest of those killed were shot in the classroom. Four people were critically wounded. Wong was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in an office, a satchel containing ammunition slung around his neck, authorities said. Police found two handguns — a 9 mm and a .45-caliber — and a hunting knife. Thirty-seven people in all made it out of the building, including 26 who hid in the boiler room in the basement, cowering there for three hours while police methodically searched the building and tried to determine whether the gunman was still alive and whether he was holding any hostages, Zikuski said. On the day of the killings, Wong mailed a letter to a Binghamton TV station, along with his driver's license, gun permit, and photos of him posing with pistols. The letter unleashes a slew of bizarre, paranoid accusations against police officers whom Wong, 41, believed were persecuting him, repeatedly saying breaking into his room, stealing from him, causing him to lose his job and trying to stage a car accident with him. The missive, whose claims are unsupported by any publicly known facts, suggests Wong was deranged. It already was known the Vietnam-born Chinese loner, who lost his $8 an hour vacuum cleaner factory job in November, was deeply frustrated with his lack of English skills and obsessed with acquiring a gun before he went on his shooting rampage. "The letter sounds bizarre and has tones of persecution. And in his internal world, this violence might have been some sort of retaliation," said Dr. Vatsal Thakkar, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at NYU's Langone Medical Center. "Put these actions and the theme of the letter all together, and it could point to major mental illness, quite possibly paranoid schizophrenia." Wong's sister told NBC's "Today" show that she could "see that he was very depressed from losing his job, and he was very frustrated with his English-speaking skills." Source: KDA2, 4/3/09; New York Post, 4/6/09

 

Date: 5/2009

Location: Searingtown, Nassau, NY

Summary: On May 13, 2009, Kay Barragan, the wife of 1-800-Mattress mogul Napoleon Barragan, was murdered in her Long Island home, allegedly by her mentally troubled son, police said. The family driver found 65-year-old Kay Barragan's body at the bottom of a flight of stairs when he reported for work as usual at the Searingtown home about 7 a.m. Nassau County cops hauled Eduardo Barragan, 38, out of the house in handcuffs and wearing only a robe. He was charged with second-degree murder. They said mother and son were alone in the house when she died. Allegedly, Barragan beat his mother until she bled to death. Eduardo's sister, Kay Otilia Massel, 42, called her brother "a good man who has suffered for 19 years with schizophrenia." Prior History: In the weeks before Kay Barragan’s death, trouble brewed the Long Island home she shared with her son, Eduardo. Nassau County police said in the prior six weeks, they received four 911 calls from the house. Nassau County Detective Lt. John Azzata confirmed the mother and son had a fight but said there was no firm motive for the slaying of Barragan. The 911 calls to the home on Sunset Drive in Searingtown were all "minor in nature," with one involving a larceny, Azzata said. Eduardo Barragan's sister told the Daily News her brother suffered from schizophrenia. Azzata said only that "he has a medical history" and no criminal record. Subsequent History: On November 5, 2009, Nassau County Judge David Sullivan found Eduardo Barragan unfit to stand trial for the May murder of his mother, and sent him to a secure upstate psychiatric facility indefinitely. Sullivan said in court that Barragan, 38, had been examined by two psychiatrists, both of whom determined that he is mentally incompetent to stand trial. Neither prosecutors nor Barragan's defense lawyer contested those findings. Source: New York Daily News, 5/14/09, 5/15/09; Newsday, 11/6/09

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Alberto Menegro, 42, was charged with second-degree murder and first-degree assault in a fatal attack on his 8-year-old niece and other relatives in their Manhattan apartment. Police said that Menegro claimed to be "hearing voices in his head" when he killed the girl by slitting her throat and attacked other relatives on October 19, 2003. Menegro was alone in the kitchen with his sister's only child when he suddenly snapped and stabbed the 8-year-old with a steak knife, police said. Other relatives at home heard blood-curdling screams coming from the room, and the mom and uncle rushed in to see what was going on, cops said. Horrified at the sight of the dying girl crumpled on the floor, they tried to stop Menegro, who stabbed and wounded both of them, police said. Menegro's relatives told police he had been treated for schizophrenia at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital as recently as March 2003, but that he stopped taking his medicine. Menegro, who also cut his own throat during the incident, was moved to Bellevue Hospital after being treated at Harlem Hospital. Source: New York Post, October 21, 2003 The Daily News, October 20, 2003 New York Post, October 23, 2003

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Alberto Menegro, 42, was charged with second-degree murder and first-degree assault in a fatal attack on his 8-year-old niece and other relatives in their Manhattan apartment. Police said that Menegro claimed to be "hearing voices in his head" when he killed the girl by slitting her throat and attacked other relatives on October 19, 2003. Menegro was alone in the kitchen with his sister's only child when he suddenly snapped and stabbed the 8-year-old with a steak knife, police said. Other relatives at home heard blood-curdling screams coming from the room, and the mom and uncle rushed in to see what was going on, cops said. Horrified at the sight of the dying girl crumpled on the floor, they tried to stop Menegro, who stabbed and wounded both of them, police said. Menegro's relatives told police he had been treated for schizophrenia at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital as recently as March 2003, but that he stopped taking his medicine. Menegro, who also cut his own throat during the incident, was moved to Bellevue Hospital after being treated at Harlem Hospital. Source: New York Post, October 21, 2003 The Daily News, October 20, 2003 New York Post, October 23, 2003

 

RecordID: 860

Date: 1/2000

Location: , , NY

Summary: Alan Zelencic, 28, was shot and killed by police after he lunged at them with a 15-inch knife. He had just slashed his mother with a knife and the police were trying to apprehend him when the shots were fired. His mother was treated and released. Zelencic didn't have a criminal history, but he did have a history of mental illness for which he had been treated at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in 1991. Police officials said Officers Caruso and Dudley did not appear to have violated department guidelines that govern situations in which officers confront emotionally disturbed people. Source: The New York Times, January 18, 2000, p. 3

 

Date: 10/2001

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Police killed a mentally ill Bronx man who shot and injured his sister, Angelika Brinker, 38, and his roommate, Shamula Subaka, 41. Police said the shooting occurred because Malik Mustafa was pointing a pistol at his sister's head and refused to yield. Mustafa, 36, has a history of psychological problems. Police speculate Mustafa's failure to take his medication triggered this incident. Source: Newsday

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Samuel Calloway, 19, of New Rochelle, NY killed his 6-year-old cousin Marquise Newman with a hatchet in the boy's apartment, then set the apartment on fire on August 4, 2002. In April 2004, Calloway pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in Westchester County Court to avoid a conviction at trial that would have produced a much longer sentence. Calloway said he killed the boy after going to his apartment, forcing a babysitter outside and barricading the door. He also pleaded guilty to attempted murder for trying to kill 44-year-old Chauncey Williams with the same hatchet hours earlier outside a New Rochelle pizzeria. Calloway told the police the man had made a pass at him. Acting state Supreme Court Justice Richard Molea promised Calloway a prison term of 20 years to life at sentencing. Calloway's attorney says he is a paranoid schizophrenic who also suffers from bipolar disorder and who was not taking his prescribed medication at the time of the murder. The defense had hoped Calloway could plead not responsible by reason of mental disease, but that would have required the consent of the office of District Attorney Jeanine Pirro. The prosecution hired an expert who evaluated Calloway and determined that despite his illness he was aware of what he was doing. Source: The Journal News (Westchester County, NY), December 31, 2002; The Associated Press, April 23, 2004; The Journal News (Westchester County, NY) April 23, 2004; White Plains Journal News, June 9, 2004

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Samuel Calloway, 19, of New Rochelle, NY killed his 6-year-old cousin Marquise Newman with a hatchet in the boy's apartment, then set the apartment on fire on August 4, 2002. In April 2004, Calloway pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in Westchester County Court to avoid a conviction at trial that would have produced a much longer sentence. Calloway said he killed the boy after going to his apartment, forcing a babysitter outside and barricading the door. He also pleaded guilty to attempted murder for trying to kill 44-year-old Chauncey Williams with the same hatchet hours earlier outside a New Rochelle pizzeria. Calloway told the police the man had made a pass at him. Acting state Supreme Court Justice Richard Molea promised Calloway a prison term of 20 years to life at sentencing. Calloway's attorney says he is a paranoid schizophrenic who also suffers from bipolar disorder and who was not taking his prescribed medication at the time of the murder. The defense had hoped Calloway could plead not responsible by reason of mental disease, but that would have required the consent of the office of District Attorney Jeanine Pirro. The prosecution hired an expert who evaluated Calloway and determined that despite his illness he was aware of what he was doing. Source: The Journal News (Westchester County, NY), December 31, 2002; The Associated Press, April 23, 2004; The Journal News (Westchester County, NY) April 23, 2004; White Plains Journal News, June 9, 2004

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: John Cipollina, 41, who is diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, spent four months in jail after he attacked his parents during a car ride near their North Buffalo, NY home in March, 2002, authorities said. According to police statements, 65-year-old Rosario Cipollina told of how his son gave him a black eye and was prone to throwing chairs around their home, and the chief of the Erie County district attorney's Domestic Violence Bureau described the Cipollina case as a classic example of elder abuse. After Cipollina was released from jail, a judge signed an order of protection that forced him to move out of his parents' house and refrain from all contact with them. This was eventually modified to allow visitation only. Despite Cipollina's continued requests to return to his parents' home, City Court Judge Thomas P. Franczyk delayed making a decision on this until he received more information on the son's mental condition and medication. Rosario Cipollina, however, told Judge Franczyk that he did not object to his son's return, but wanted "to make sure he's taking his medication". Source: Buffalo News (New York), April 7 & May 4, 2003

 

Date: 7/2000

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Jaime Oliveira, 22, a man with schizophrenia, allegedly attacked two women in July and August 2000 after picking them up in his cab early in the morning outside two different bars in Woodside, Queens. In July 2000, he allegedly refused to allow a 31-year-old woman to leave his cab by locking her door from the front seat. He then walked around to the back, opened the passenger door and attacked her. In August 2000, he allegedly raped a 25-year-old woman as she slept in the back of his black Lincoln Town Car. He was charged with rape, sodomy, attempted rape, unlawful imprisonment, sex abuse and kidnapping and faces up to 50 years in prison if convicted. Oliveira, who had spent much of the two years since his arrest in and out of mental institutions and was on medication, has been missing since shortly after posting $150,000 bail on Oct. 21, 2003. He failed to appear for his November 5, 2003 trial date. "I'm not speculating" about whether he went off his medication once he made bail, his attorney Lawrence Kerben said. "He was looking at a lot of time. Fifteen years was the last offer from the DA's office." Source: New York Daily News, November 18, 2003

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: Granby, Oswego, NY

Summary: Joseph Blake, an Oswego County, NY, man, was accused of killing his parents James, 81, and Betty Blake, 72, by striking them with a claw hammer. Their bodies were found July 16, 2003 in their home in Granby, NY. Blake, 48, was charged with two counts of first-degree murder. According to the arrest report, Blake has a history of mental health problems and a long involvement with Community Mental Health. A judge ordered an evaluation of Blake by two county psychiatrists due to Blake's disheveled appearance in court and his past history of psychiatric problems. The day before his parents were killed, Blake was taken by police to the Oswego Hospital emergency room for a mental health evaluation after he got into an altercation with a social worker. On the morning that his parents' bodies were found, Oswego officers again picked up Blake on a mental health order, which they have said was unrelated to the killings. Subsequent History: Blake pleaded guilty on November 18, 2004 to killing his parents and was sentenced to two concurrent terms of 25 years to life. On October 18, 2004, Blake was found competent enough to assist in his defense and stand trial, acting County Judge John Elliott said. During a brief hearing in April 2004, defense lawyer Joseph Rodak said a clinical psychologist recommended Blake undergo a brain scan because he had suffered a series of head injuries throughout his lifetime and these may have caused brain damage. After appearing in Oswego County Surrogate Court on July 13, 2004, it was decided that Blake would undergo further psychiatric evaluations.The District Attorney's Office was given the opportunity to select their own doctor to evaluate Blake. Prior History: Since 1995, Blake had been treated in several psychiatric facilities for bi-polar disorder. Blake also had a history of going off medications, Rodak said. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), January 27, 2004/ April 27, 2004/ July 20, 2004/ October 19, 2004/ November 19, 2004; The Palladium Times, July 19, 2004/ October 19, 2004; Long Island Newsday, December 21, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Police alleged that Bonergy Quelal, 47, threw materials he found in a transit storage shed - including a fire extinguisher - onto the tracks in a subway tunnel in Greenwich Village, setting off a small explosion on the night of February 29, 2004. More than 1,000 riders on several trains were evacuated. The Bronx man had been released on February 19 from the Weill Cornell Medical Center after 17 days of treatment, despite objections from his family. A police investigator said Quelal suffers from bipolar disorder and takes medication for the illness. Quelal, who reportedly is unemployed, was arrested shortly after the incident and was being held for arraignment. Prosecutors were determining what charges should be filed. Prior History: Neighbors said Quelal had a history of spraying ammonia and bleach on lit stoves and inside clothes dryers, as well as tossing furniture out windows - once nearly hitting a passerby. On October 18, 2000 firefighters were called to Quelal's apartment in response to a kitchen-stove fire. Neighbors said he set the fire and that he had said he saw the devil in the flames. In August 2003 Quelal was charged with trespassing at Brooklyn's Fort Hamiliton, but the charges were dropped. He was arrested later that month in upstate New York for stealing credit cards and checks from mailboxes, and served about six months in jail. Soon after he was freed, he spent two days in the psychiatric ward at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx, his brother said. Quelal's brother said Quelal blew up his medication in a microwave after his latest release from the hospital. At the time of his arrest for the subway incident, he was being sought on a warrant for failing to appear in court for a traffic-law violation, police said. Source: Newsday (NY), March 2, 2004 Daily News (NY), March 2, 2004

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Ronald Popadich, 40, a Bergen County, NJ man with schizophrenia, faces a 70-count indictment in Manhattan that charges him with second-degree murder in the death of Neal Spicehandler, a lawyer from Long Island who was struck as he crossed Seventh Avenue during one of Popadich's alleged hit-and-run rages on Feb. 12, 2002. Popadich also faces attempted murder charges for allegedly striking 17 other people that day and seven people in a rampage on Feb. 14. In addition, he is charged with shooting New York City cabbie Gurmukh Singh, 54, twice in the head. Singh survived. In March 2004, Popadich pleaded guilty in Hackensack (NJ) Superior Court to murder, carjacking and weapons charges related to the shooting death of a New Jersey woman on February 10, 2002. The death spurred Popadich's five-day crime spree, culminating in the hit-and-run incidents in New York. In April 2004, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison without parole for the New Jersey murder, and could spend the rest of his life behind bars if he is convicted of one count of murder and 26 counts of attempted murder in the Manhattan incidents. See Episode #2481 Source: New Jersey Journal, March 6, 2004 The Record (Bergen County, NJ) April 16, 2004

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Ronald Popadich, 40, a Bergen County, NJ man with schizophrenia, faces a 70-count indictment in Manhattan that charges him with second-degree murder in the death of Neal Spicehandler, a lawyer from Long Island who was struck as he crossed Seventh Avenue during one of Popadich's alleged hit-and-run rages on Feb. 12, 2002. Popadich also faces attempted murder charges for allegedly striking 17 other people that day and seven people in a rampage on Feb. 14. In addition, he is charged with shooting New York City cabbie Gurmukh Singh, 54, twice in the head. Singh survived. In March 2004, Popadich pleaded guilty in Hackensack (NJ) Superior Court to murder, carjacking and weapons charges related to the shooting death of a New Jersey woman on February 10, 2002. The death spurred Popadich's five-day crime spree, culminating in the hit-and-run incidents in New York. In April 2004, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison without parole for the New Jersey murder, and could spend the rest of his life behind bars if he is convicted of one count of murder and 26 counts of attempted murder in the Manhattan incidents. See Episode #2481 Source: New Jersey Journal, March 6, 2004 The Record (Bergen County, NJ) April 16, 2004

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Ronald Popadich, 40, a Bergen County, NJ man with schizophrenia, faces a 70-count indictment in Manhattan that charges him with second-degree murder in the death of Neal Spicehandler, a lawyer from Long Island who was struck as he crossed Seventh Avenue during one of Popadich's alleged hit-and-run rages on Feb. 12, 2002. Popadich also faces attempted murder charges for allegedly striking 17 other people that day and seven people in a rampage on Feb. 14. In addition, he is charged with shooting New York City cabbie Gurmukh Singh, 54, twice in the head. Singh survived. In March 2004, Popadich pleaded guilty in Hackensack (NJ) Superior Court to murder, carjacking and weapons charges related to the shooting death of a New Jersey woman on February 10, 2002. The death spurred Popadich's five-day crime spree, culminating in the hit-and-run incidents in New York. In April 2004, he was sentenced to 30 years in prison without parole for the New Jersey murder, and could spend the rest of his life behind bars if he is convicted of one count of murder and 26 counts of attempted murder in the Manhattan incidents. See Episode #2481 Source: New Jersey Journal, March 6, 2004 The Record (Bergen County, NJ) April 16, 2004

 

Date: 10/2000

Location: Yonkers, Westchester, NY

Summary: David "Lobo" Salazar, a homeless man with a history of psychiatric illness, was sentenced to 12 years in state prison for fatally beating a Mexican gang member whose body he dumped in the Hudson River. Salazar, 29, told Westchester County Judge Barbara Zambelli that he was drunk when he beat 19-year-old Jaime "Dado" Rojas to death in October 2000. Rojas' body was discovered floating near the Yonkers City Pier on October 9, 2000. Salazar said that he hit Rojas seven or eight times with a stick and that he had sniffed glue, drank alcohol and smoked crack shortly before the killing. Salazar had been beaten up a week earlier during a fight with Rojas and another man. Salazar, who has suffered from schizophrenia, was admitted to a psychiatric hospital following his arrest a few days after the body was found. He was found to be competent to stand trial in 2003 and told his Legal Aid lawyer not to pursue a psychiatric defense. Facing second-degree murder charges, he was about to go to trial in January 2004 when he pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter in exchange for the 12-year sentence. Source: The Journal News.com (NY), March 10, 2004

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Pleasantville, Westchester, NY

Summary: Sheila Davalloo, a woman with bipolar disorder and a family history of mental illness, was convicted of second-degree attempted murder, first-degree assault and fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon after stabbing her husband Paul Christos, on March 23, 2003 in their Pleasantville, NY home. In April 2004, she was sentenced to 25 years in prison. Christos was stabbed while handcuffed and blindfolded during a kinky game Davalloo suggested at their home - and then again later when she drove him to a secluded area of the Westchester Medical Center's grounds, the prosecution contended at trial. She faces a minimum of five years and a maximum of 25 years in state prison. Davalloo, 34, said she was high on painkillers that day and did not recall stabbing Christos. After the assault on her husband, Davalloo became a suspect in the November 8, 2002 slaying of Anna-Lisa Raymundo, who was beaten and stabbed to death in her Stamford, CT apartment. Testimony revealed that both women were having relationships with Nelson Sessler, a research scientist at Purdue Pharma, where they also worked as scientists. Davalloo was referred to a social worker at her workplace in September 2002, but two months later stopped returning the counselor's phone calls and canceled her appointments. Dr. Donald Lewittes, a forensic psychologist who examined Davalloo after the March 23 incident, testified that he believes Davalloo was misdiagnosed. For at least 48 hours after the stabbing, Davalloo suffered from a dissociative disorder in which she hovered between consciousness and psychosis, Lewittes said. Davalloo's psychiatrist at Westchester Medical Center testified that Davalloo was admitted to the facility April 3 and stayed for several months. Dr. Jay Draoua said he diagnosed her with depression and hypomania and prescribed an anti-psychotic medication when she was discharged. She said she regularly took Valium and Xanax and up to 15 to 20 Vicodin pills a day. The stabbing, Lewittes said, "happened through a psychotic, confused mind and was meant to hurt him, not kill him." Source: White Plains Journal News, February 10 & 20, 2004 The Stamford Advocate, 2/11, 2/12, & 2/19, 2004 White Plains Journal News, 4/21/04; Lower Hudson Journal News (NY), 1/15/09

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Mount Vernon, Westchester, NY

Summary: On September 19, 2002, Kimberly Weldon threw her 3-year-old son, Malik, in front of a school bus in Mount Vernon, NY because she said the voices in her head told her he should be spared the troubled life she had led. The bus passed over Malik, who was not seriously injured. She was charged with attempted murder. At trial, a psychologist determined that the 38-year-old suffered from psychosis and did not understand the consequences or wrongfulness of what she had done. The prosecution’s own expert agreed. Weldon had begun acting strangely in late summer 2002 but had no history of psychiatric problems. Her 17-year old daughter told doctors that, hours before the incident, Weldon had ordered her and her brother into the family car and told them to undress. Then she had them get dressed again and return to their Mount Vernon apartment, but told them not to go near the doors and windows and that Jesus was coming. Two doctors who observed Weldon in the county jail in October 2002 reported that she was acutely psychotic and delusional when she arrived but was competent to stand trial. Weldon was freed on bail and was being treated as an outpatient at St. Vincent’s Hospital. She was given visitation rights with her children, who were being cared for by relatives. Source: White Plains Journal News (NY), January 12, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Middle Island, Suffolk, NY

Summary: Christopher Maggio, 31, who suffers from depression and "probably other mental illnesses" according to his lawyer, held his parents hostage in their Head of the Harbor home because he was angry about the break-up of his marriage. Maggio has been charged with second-degree kidnapping for terrorizing his parents and threatening them with a knife, a handgun and a stun gun and for causing destruction to their property. Maggio's wife, a Russian woman he brought back from that country to marry, filed an order of protection against him after several months of marriage and finally left him after he violated the order. Source: Newsday (New York), October 1, 2002

 

Date: 10/2002

Location: Queens Village, Queens, NY

Summary: Robert Jeanlord, 25, told police he suffocated his mother Marie Jeanlord, 52, on October 28, 2002, before stabbing himself in the chest, because he thought she was poisoning him, authorities said. Police found Robert on the porch waiting for officers to arrive and his mother’s body in the bathroom of her Queens Village home. Police said Robert Jeanlord, who was undergoing psychiatric evaluation at Mary Immaculate Hospital last night, suffers from schizophrenia. He apparently stabbed himself twice with a kitchen knife. Source: Newsday, October 29, 2002

 

Date: 9/2001

Location: Webster, Monroe, NY

Summary: Randy Eugene Smith, a mentally ill homeless man, was charged with second-degree murder in the stabbing death of Lorie Hartman on Sept. 2, 2001. Smith was accused of killing Hartman, 42, as she walked her two dogs in Empire Boulevard Park in Webster, New York. Smith had been living in the park for about six weeks before the attack. He was found incompetent in December 2001 and remanded to Rochester Psychiatric Center. Monroe County Court Judge Patricia D. Marks agreed on Nov. 13, 2002, to extend Smith's commitment for another year. Subsequent History: Smith pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter in April 2005, and was sentenced on June 23, 2005 to the maximum sentence of 25 years. He had earlier been charged with second-degree murder but was initially ruled incompetent to stand trial. However, in May, 2004, he was deemed competent and was later put on trial. But in October 2004, his trial ended in a hung jury. Later, an eighth-inch-long hair matching Smith's hair was found on Hartman's body and her blood was also found on his clothing. Prior History: Smith has been mentally ill since the 1980s and was involuntarily committed to the psychiatric center in 1998 for refusing to take medication to control paranoid schizophrenia. He was eventually released when his condition improved, according to court records. Source: Rochester Democrat Chronicle, November 14, 2002; May 4, 2004; May 3, 2005; June 24, 2005;

 

Date: 12/2001

Location: Sodus, Wayne, NY

Summary: Sharone S. Thomas, 17, is charged with assault and aggravated assault for allegedly hitting trooper John Jackson in the face with a rock the size of a hand grenade outside a store in Sodus on Dec. 11, 2001. In April, doctors deemed Thomas mentally unfit to face prosecution, and the court committed him to a psychiatric center. He was cleared for trial in early November 2002. He faces a maximum of 25 years in state prison if convicted of both charges. Prior History: Thomas has a history of assaulting police officers, and was tried as a juvenile because he was younger than 16. Thomas has an extensive history of mental illness. He has been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, "including paranoid delusions and hallucinations." If a jury finds him not guilty of the charges by reason of mental disease, Thomas will be sent to a secure mental health treatment facility, where doctors will be asked to determine whether he is dangerous. If they find that he is, he can be held at the institution and his case will be reviewed every two years. Source: Finger Lakes Times, November 19, 2002

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Jeremy Perkins, 28, is charged with second-degree murder and weapons possession in connection with the stabbing death of his 54-year-old mother, Ellie Perkins. Police found her body in a bedroom in their Buffalo home on March 13, 2003. A not guilty plea was entered for Perkins and he was ordered to submit to a psychiatric evaluation. A friend of the family told The Buffalo News that Perkins had developed schizophrenia in the last year and that family members had been treating him with vitamins. On July 29, 2003, Perkins pleaded not mentally responsible for the murder of his mother. Erie County Judge Shirley Troutman ordered further psychiatric examinations for Perkins, refusing to consider the findings of two members of the staff of the Rochester Forensic Mental Unit who have been treating Perkins since early August 2003. Troutman ultimately must decide whether Perkins goes to prison or gets long-term treatment in a guarded mental facility. Source: The Times Union, March 15, 2003 Buffalo News (New York), November 15, 2003

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Lockport, Niagara, NY

Summary: Aaron A. Paterson, 27, a Lockport, NY man who inflicted apparent brain damage on his infant daughter in three incidents of child abuse in March, 2002, received a 10-year prison sentence in December 2002. Paterson, who has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder according to his attorney, allegedly smothered, shook and slammed his daughter's head against a doorjam in three separate incidents. The baby's mother, who did not know about the assaults, took the baby to the doctor because she seemed lethargic and the injuries were noted. Paterson will have to serve 8 and 1/2 years of his sentence before he is elgible for parole. Once he gets out of prison, he will be on five years of probation. The judge also signed an order barring Paterson from having any contact with his wife and daughter for the next decade. Paterson had no prior criminal record. Source: The Buffalo News, December 20, 2002

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Larme Price, 30, was charged with first-degree murder and faces the death penalty for allegedly killing four immigrants in separate acts of revenge against Arabs for the September 11 terror attacks. However, questions mounted about whether proper psychiatric treatment could have cut short the rampage. The killing spree began February 8, 2003, when police say Price shot and killed a Guyanese immigrant of Indian descent in a Queens grocery store. Two hours later, Price allegedly fatally shot an immigrant from India in his Brooklyn convenience store. An immigrant from the Ukraine was killed March 10 at his laundermat in Brooklyn after Price said he "disrespected" him. Ten days later, Price allegedly killed a Yemeni immigrant in a Crown Heights, Brooklyn, grocery store. Brooklyn Criminal Court Judge Timothy Duffici placed Price on suicide watch after his arrest and ordered detoxification treatment for the admitted drug user. Price's relatives have said they repeatedly tried to get psychiatric treatment for the father of three who descended into paranoia and rage. They said Price was turned away from Woodhull Hospital several times. A hospital source told the Daily News that Price had been seen by a psychiatrist but was discharged because he showed no sign of being a danger to himself or others. Source: Daily News, April 1, 2003

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: Oswego, Oswego, NY

Summary: On February 19, 2002, Rebecca A. Boardway, 30, fatally stabbed her daughter, 10-year-old Mariah Skanley. Boardway told police she stabbed her daughter with a 4-inch steak knife to save the girl from going to hell. Boardway pleaded not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect. Subsequent History: Oswego County Judge Walter Hafner Jr. ruled that Boardway was a threat to herself and others after listening to a state psychiatrist testify that Boardway was hallucinating and psychotic when she killed her daughter. Boardway was charged with attempted murder and felony assault after police said she stabbed her daughter. During her plea, Boardway, who was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1999, told the judge she wasn't taking her medication and hadn't seen a psychiatrist in two to three months before her arrest. Subsequent History: On July 28, 2009, an Onondaga County judge ruled that Rebecca Boardway, who claimed she killed her daughter to save the child from going to hell, would remain at Hutchings Psychiatric Center for the time being but will be allowed escorted furloughs on and off the campus. Source: The Post-Standard, 3/26/03; Fox44.net, 7/29/09

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Samuel Calloway, 19, of New Rochelle, NY killed his 6-year-old cousin Marquise Newman with a hatchet in the boy's apartment, then set the apartment on fire on August 4, 2002. In April 2004, Calloway pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in Westchester County Court to avoid a conviction at trial that would have produced a much longer sentence. Calloway said he killed the boy after going to his apartment, forcing a babysitter outside and barricading the door. He also pleaded guilty to attempted murder for trying to kill 44-year-old Chauncey Williams with the same hatchet hours earlier outside a New Rochelle pizzeria. Calloway told the police the man had made a pass at him. Acting state Supreme Court Justice Richard Molea promised Calloway a prison term of 20 years to life at sentencing. Calloway's attorney says he is a paranoid schizophrenic who also suffers from bipolar disorder and who was not taking his prescribed medication at the time of the murder. The defense had hoped Calloway could plead not responsible by reason of mental disease, but that would have required the consent of the office of District Attorney Jeanine Pirro. The prosecution hired an expert who evaluated Calloway and determined that despite his illness he was aware of what he was doing. Source: The Journal News (Westchester County, NY), December 31, 2002; The Associated Press, April 23, 2004; The Journal News (Westchester County, NY) April 23, 2004; White Plains Journal News, June 9, 2004

 

Date: 7/2001

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Georgia Charlton, 21, threw a liter of acid onto her boyfriend, Tenlin Lyew, permanently disfiguring his face on June 18, 2001 in Brooklyn, NY. She was convicted of attempted murder and sentenced to 17 years in prison. Charlton was trying to scar Lyew for life because he threatened to leave her if she had an abortion - but then left her anyway after she delivered their baby, law-enforcement sources said. She had pleaded not guilty, claiming in court documents that she doused Lyew with industrial-strength drain opener after he tried to beat her. Charlton, who has been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, and Lyew started a steamy love affair in their native Jamaica. Subsequent history: Charlton attempted suicide in March 2004. Source: The New York Post, April 21, 2003 The New York Post, March 16, 2004

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: Ozone Park, Queens, NY

Summary: Felix Rondon, 32, of Queens, New York, savagely bit his pregnant, live-in girlfriend's face in an attempt to permanently disfigure her. Rondon suffers from bipolar disorder and had sought psychiatric help the week before the February 18, 2002, attack on 22-year-old Jessica Mencia in their South Ozone Park home. He pleaded guilty to assault charges and agreed to spend 11 1/2 years behind bars. Although Rondon originally faced an attempted murder charge, Mencia agreed to the plea deal so she could avoid testifying at a trial, prosecutors said. She still suffers from the attack, when Rondon bit off large parts of both ears, parts of her forehead and cheeks, and nearly took out an eye, police said. Mencia later gave birth to a disabled child and will have to continue to get skin grafts and plastic surgery for years. Before handing down the negotiated sentence, Supreme Court Justice William Erlbaum noted Rondon's pattern of mental illness, including bipolar disorder, adjustment disorder and schizoaffective disorder. He said he hoped Rondon receives proper treatment in prison. Erlbaum also signed an order prohibiting Rondon from coming into contact with Mencia before November 27, 2017. He said Rondon would be in violation of the order if he accepted a visit from Mencia at prison, although he said the parties could ask a judge to modify the order at a later date. Source: Daily News (New York), May 28, 2003 Newsday (New York), August 7, 2003

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: John Cipollina, 41, who is diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, spent four months in jail after he attacked his parents during a car ride near their North Buffalo, NY home in March, 2002, authorities said. According to police statements, 65-year-old Rosario Cipollina told of how his son gave him a black eye and was prone to throwing chairs around their home, and the chief of the Erie County district attorney's Domestic Violence Bureau described the Cipollina case as a classic example of elder abuse. After Cipollina was released from jail, a judge signed an order of protection that forced him to move out of his parents' house and refrain from all contact with them. This was eventually modified to allow visitation only. Despite Cipollina's continued requests to return to his parents' home, City Court Judge Thomas P. Franczyk delayed making a decision on this until he received more information on the son's mental condition and medication. Rosario Cipollina, however, told Judge Franczyk that he did not object to his son's return, but wanted "to make sure he's taking his medication". Source: Buffalo News (New York), April 7 & May 4, 2003

 

Date: 3/2001

Location: , , NY

Summary: Juan Arequipa, 49, spiked a bottle of Coca-Cola with cyanide and tried to get his unsuspecting teenage children to join him in a fatal toast. Fortunately, both children survived. After Arequipa's son saw his father and sister were getting sick and collapsing, he called 911. The father and daughter were unconscious when ambulance workers arrived, and Arequipa later died. His daughter was in critical but stable condition the next day. Police sources stated that Arequipa was distraught and depressed. Family members stated that he had spoken of suicide and was being treated with medication for depression. Source: Newsday, March 24, 2001

 

Date: 1/2002

Location: Rockaway Park, Queens, NY

Summary: Timothy Fahy, 18, is accused of shooting Officer Kevin Boyle, 43, in the leg during a standoff in Rockaway Park on January 31, 2002. Fahy has remained at Kings County Hospital Center undergoing psychiatric evaluation since the shooting and is awaiting arraignment. Police sources said Fahy allegedly stopped taking his Risperdal, a drug used to treat schizophrenia, the day before the incident. They also said it appears that Fahy had been receiving treatment for mental illness at St. John's Episcopal Hospital in Far Rockaway. Officials from the Queens district attorney's office said Fahy will be charged with attempted murder, attempted aggravated assault and criminal possession of a weapon. Source: Newsday (New York, NY), February 2, 2002

 

Date: 2/2001

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Susan Mooney, 36, who police say has a history of psychiatric problems, was arrested and charged with second-degree murder for smothering her 7-month-old son on February 25, 2001. Mooney had been hospitalized twice in the weeks prior to her son's death, once at the request of her family and once after she called police and requested the death penalty for herself. The baby's father reported that Mooney, his common-law wife of 12 years, began to act strangely after the birth of their second child. Mooney's attorney's claim she was suffering from post-partum psychosis. Source: The New York Times, February 26, 2001, p. B5 The Daily News, October 3, 2002

 

Date: 10/2001

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Police killed a mentally ill Bronx man who shot and injured his sister, Angelika Brinker, 38, and his roommate, Shamula Subaka, 41. Police said the shooting occurred because Malik Mustafa was pointing a pistol at his sister's head and refused to yield. Mustafa, 36, has a history of psychological problems. Police speculate Mustafa's failure to take his medication triggered this incident. Source: Newsday

 

Date: 4/2001

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: Kenneth Jerome Taylor, of Rochester, NY, pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect for slashing the throat of four-year-old Keyanna Hill on April 12, 2001. Hill was hospitalized for several days, but survived the attack. At trial, the judge accepted Taylor's plea and, pending a forensic evaluation, could commit Taylor to a state mental institution for the rest of his life. Psychiatrists hired by both the state and defense found that Taylor's illness at the time prevented him from differentiating between right and wrong during the attack on Hill. Taylor, 39, suffers from paranoid schizophrenia, court-appointed psychiatrists said. After he was arrested, he told police that he had been treated for schizophrenia but no longer needed medication. Source: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, August 30, 2002 Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 12, 2002

 

Date: 4/2000

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: James Murphy was shot and killed by police on April 22, 2000 in Queens after assaulting his mother and slitting his own wrists. Neighbors called 911 after Murphy's mother, Dorothy, 70, fled to a nearby house to take shelter after a violent fight with her son inside their home. After Murphy's mother escaped, Murphy went searching for her and then stood in the middle of their street, screaming. Murphy ran to confront officers who had pulled up in a patrol car. He pointed his gun at them and refused to drop it when ordered. He was then shot several times by police officers. Police said he had a history of mental illness and was admitted to an undisclosed hospital for psychiatric evaluation April 5 after threatening his mother. Source: Daily News (New York), April 23, 2000, p. 13

 

RecordID: 860

Date: 1/2000

Location: , , NY

Summary: Alan Zelencic, 28, was shot and killed by police after he lunged at them with a 15-inch knife. He had just slashed his mother with a knife and the police were trying to apprehend him when the shots were fired. His mother was treated and released. Zelencic didn't have a criminal history, but he did have a history of mental illness for which he had been treated at the Long Island Jewish Medical Center in 1991. Police officials said Officers Caruso and Dudley did not appear to have violated department guidelines that govern situations in which officers confront emotionally disturbed people. Source: The New York Times, January 18, 2000, p. 3

 

Date: 4/2001

Location: , , NY

Summary: Jose Almonte was charged with attempted murder, assault, weapons possession and endangering the welfare of a child after he attacked 8-year-old Ricky Bermudez in front of their apartment building in April 2001. A sergeant with the police emergency services unit, Brian Wall, said that after Mr. Almonte barricaded himself in his apartment, it took "some intense negotiations" first to get him to put his knife down, then to get him to let the police in. But Mr. Almonte did not resist once the police were in his apartment, Sergeant Wall said. A cousin of Almonte's said that Almonte had been diagnosed with schizophrenia six years ago and that he had been hospitalized several times. Source: The New York Times, April 10, 2001, p. B3

 

RecordID: 997

Date: 3/2000

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Fred Magyar, 30, who suffers from mental illness, pleaded guilty to a charge of disorderly conduct stemming from an arrest for allegedly stalking a young boy in Buffalo, New York. Chief City Judge Thomas P. Amodeo sentenced Magyar to time served for the 27 days he spent in jail in March 2000 and to continue taking his prescribed medications and keep up with the mental health counseling he has been receiving. In addition, Magyar was ordered to stay away from the boy and his family. Source: The Buffalo News, May 19, 2000, p. 5C

 

Date: 11/2001

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Clifton Goring, 19, is suspected of fatally beating and then tossing a homeless woman, Terana Street, 33, off the roof of a five-story building in Brooklyn after arguing over who would sleep on a landing. He has been charged with second-degree murder. Police have stated that after beating Street by punching and kicking her in the throat, Goring believed she was dead and fled the building, but then returned shortly to remove her pants and shoes and throw her off the roof to make it look as if she had been raped. Street died of blunt impact injuries and evidently had known Goring for years. Goring’s mother and his half-brother have stated that Goring had not been taking his anti-psychotic medications for the schizophrenia and other mental problems that he has been treated for since he was 10 years old. In fact, he had been hospitalized at Kings County Hospital just five days before this murder after his mother called 911 to complain that Goring was banging on her door. He was released the next day. Source: Daily News (New York), November 22, 2001

 

Date: 11/2001

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Jackson Roman, 36, is accused of pushing a 41-year-old immigrant nurse from Guyana, Latchmie Ramsamy, in front of a subway train in midtown. Ramsamy survived but part of her left foot was amputated and she remained in serious condition with a fractured skull, neck and spinal injuries. Roman was charged with attempted murder, assault and reckless endangerment, and faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted. Roman has been treated for schizophrenia and has been in and out of mental institutions since 1988. He has a particular fascination with subways, as he had blasted a shotgun at a train 14 years ago as well as fondled a passenger in a subway car last year. Roman was apparently released approximately a month prior to this incident and had left his supervised mental-health program almost immediately. New York’s mental-health bureaucracy refuses to state whether or not Roman was on medication at the time. Source: Daily News (New York), November 22, 2001; The New York Post, November 24, 2001; The Houston Chronicle, November 21, 2001

 

Date: 4/2001

Location: , Nassau, NY

Summary: Shaun T. Alexander, a Hofstra University student who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, confessed to killing his classmate, twenty-year old Max B. Kolb, in a motel room. Prosecutors said that Alexander stated that he asked Kolb to the motel to talk privately about a personal problem and when Kolb rejected Alexander’s sexual advances, he was stabbed. Kolb's body was found buried in the backyard of a house Alexander rented in Long Beach. While in intensive therapy, Alexander stated in an affidavit that he “will take medication to control [his] illness for the rest of [his] life.” Source: The New York Times, May 19, 2001

 

Date: 1/2001

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Timothy Byrne, who suffers from bipolar disorder, was arrested at New York’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral at a New Year’s Day Mass, where, during Communion, he tried to slap handcuffs on Edward Cardinal Egan, the leader of the New York Archdiocese’s 2.3 million Catholics. Byrne claimed that he was trying to publicize his belief that the story of Christ’s resurrection was a “mistaken diagnosis” and that Jesus never existed, and that he tried to make a “citizen’s arrest” against Egan because “Christian judges” kept throwing his cases out of court. He further insisted that the real Jesus is alive today, living as a 30-year-old, green-eyed Manhattan woman named Hypacia. A bright architect before mental illness reduced him to what his worried father calls “a poor soul who needs some help,” Byrne’s father disclosed that his son had not been taking his medication for the past few months. Police discovered that Byrne had been in and out of mental health facilities for more than a year and was arrested in September 1999 for threatening President Clinton. However, officials agreed to drop those charges upon Byrne’s referral to a mental-health facility. Source: The New York Post, January 2, 2001

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Lynbrook, Nassau, NY

Summary: Peter John Troy, 35, a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder and given two life sentences without parole for killing a Lynbrook, NY, priest and parishioner with a semi-automatic rifle at morning Mass, then barricading himself in his home in a seven-hour standoff with police on March 12, 2002. He was also sentenced to a minimum of 25 years in prison for the attempted first-degree murder of a police officer during his arrest, and the judge levied a $20,310.10 reimbursement for the two victims' funeral costs. Psychologist Anthony Santoro, who said he spoke with Troy on three dates, concluded that Troy was mentally capable of helping his attorney before and during trial. The conclusion contradicted his physicians' finding. Against his lawyer's advice, Troy insisted on representing himself at trial, and refused to use an insanity defense. Prior History: According to his mother, Troy began showing signs of mental illness while in college. For the next 15 years, Troy was hospitalized several times and placed on medication. Twice in 2001, Troy was detained by the police and admitted to psychiatric hospital wards. But a judge ordered him released, and a county mental health agency failed to locate him for follow-up care that doctors had urged. The state's Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled later found that Nassau County "inappropriately" closed his case. The year before the shootings, Bellevue Hospital Center had told the Nassau County mental health department that Troy was a candidate for outpatient treatment under Kendra's Law. Troy's lawyer had sought to have his client declared incompetent to stand trial, but the judge refused. Saying that Troy had shown no remorse, the judge called him "extremely dangerous, arrogant, stubborn, a mean individual hellbent on causing as much pain as you could." Sunsequent History: In March 2004, the family of one of his victims, Eileen Tosner, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Nassau County's Department of Mental Health and the Nassau University Medical Center. Troy was also named in the suit. Despite a bid by Nassau County to throw out the civil lawsuit, in July 2004 Supreme Court Justice William LaMarca ruled that the wrongful death case could move ahead. Troy represented himself in the suit. In 2005, Troy, who still claimed his innocence, tried to block the suit by refusing to release any of his mental health records, despite two orders by a state Supreme Court Justice. Source: Newsday (New York, NY), March 14, 2002; Daily News, March 16, 2002; The New York Times, March 20, 2002; July 31, 2003; Newsday, 2/28/03; 3/11/03; 6/20/03; 6/26/03; 5/17/04; 7/15/04; 5/25/05

 

Date: 9/2000

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Stacy Royster, 17 at the time, is one of five teenagers involved in the murder of a Chinese food deliveryman September 1, 2000 in Queens, New York. Royster was involved with a group of teens accused of luring the man to an abandoned house, stealing two bags of food and bludgeoning him to death with a brick. All of the teens, including Royster, were charged with murder. In the days before the crime, Royster -- who suffers from bipolar disorder with "psychotic features," according to her psychiatric records -- said she was battling a severe depression brought on by her best friend's recent departure for college. Her grandmother, Anastacia Brown, attributed her strange behavior before the murder to the effects of Royster's stopping her antipsychotic medication two months earlier. Royster, who takes Lithium to stabilize her mood swings and is currently taking the antipsychotic medication Seroquel, was hospitalized four times before the killing. She has a history of cutting herself with knives and razors and attempted suicide while in jail at Rikers Island. Royster has been offered a 17-year sentence in exchange for a guilty plea to robbery charges. Her lawyer changed his initial plan to use an insanity defense. Source: The New York Times, April 26, 2002

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Rev. Julio Torres, 57, and his wife were brutally attacked in their rectory home on March 31, 2002 by Torres' oldest son, Javier, 27, who was visiting the couple from a halfway house in Baltimore for the weekend. Javier Torres stabbed his 37-year-old stepmother in the abdomen and back and his father in five places in the chest and back before fleeing. He was arrested later that night after surrendering to police near Times Square. Torres was charged with two counts of attempted murder and is being held on Rikers Island. Rev. Torres emphasized that his son, who has suffered from paranoid schizophrenia since he was 19, attacked them in the midst of a delusional breakdown. Rev. Torres said his son regularly refused to take his anti-psychotic medicine. As recently as December, 2001, a Maryland judge found that Torres did not need to be confined to a mental hospital despite indications that he was homicidal. Source: Daily News (New York), May 6, 2002

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: At 2 a.m. on April 16, 2002, Christine Wilhelm of Hoosick Falls, NY drowned her 4-year-old son, Luke, and attempted to drown her 5-year-old son, Peter, in a bathtub in the family home. Wilhelm, who has a history of schizophrenia, pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to three counts of second-degree murder and one count of attempted second-degree murder, but was eventually convicted of murder in July 2003. On September 3, she was given the maximum sentence of 50 years to life by Rensselaer County Court Judge Patrick McGrath, who told Wilhelm he had "no room for mercy" for her. Wilhelm had claimed her husband sexually abused the children and the drowning was an intended "act of mercy" for them. It was later determined that there was no evidence of abuse. Since her imprisonment at the Rensselaer County Jail, Wilhelm underwent several disciplinary hearings, was placed on suicide watch and given antipsychotic medication. During her incarceration, she will be at a much higher risk for suicide attempts and will be shunned by other inmates, according to experts. Her attorney says Wilhelm still talks about Luke as if he's alive and has tried to take her own life in jail. "It's a sad day for psychiatry because our society seems not to be able to see the forest for the trees when it comes down to people's mental behavior," said Dr. Stephen Price, who was the defense team's star witness. Since Wilhelm's conviction, two social worker's testimonies indicating Wilhelm knew the killing was wrong have come into question, and the public defender was contemplating a grand jury investigation. Prior History: Wilhelm had a history of involvement with child protective services and multiple psychiatric hospitalizations in both Florida and New York. Prior to the killing, her husband had brought her to Albany Medical Center, where she was hospitalized in the psychiatric wing for more than a week. Wilhelm also made contact with Capital Region social services numerous times - as recently as four days before the killing - telling them she was afraid her children were in danger. Her mother testified in court that she had begged her son-in-law to hospitalize Wilhelm just two days before the drowning, and that Wilhelm was not taking her medication at the time, a fact confirmed by Kenneth Wilhelm. Subsequent History: In June 2006, Christine Wilhelm’s last-ditch appeal was making its way through the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court. Wilhelm’s lawyer, public defender Jerry Frost, was back in court in Albany arguing that Wilhelm's sentence of 50 years to life in prison should be reversed and that she should be granted a new trial. Mr. Frost contended, yet again, that Wilhelm is not guilty by the reasons of her own insanity. He also reiterated that she belongs in the strict confinement of a mental institution, not in a prison cell. Subsequent History: On August 24, 2006, an appellate court reversed Christine Wilhelm's 2003 murder conviction and ordered a new trial for the woman who was found guilty of drowning one son and trying to drown his brother. The court ruled that Wilhelm's right to counsel was violated by the testimony of child protective case workers who interviewed her without a lawyer. Wilhelm, 42, is serving a sentence of 46 years to life in prison. She had stopped taking her medication to treat paranoid schizophrenia about a month before she held her 4-year-old son, Luke, under his bathwater on April 15, 2002, prosecutors said. Wilhelm's other son, Peter, now 9, survived after begging her to let him go. He testified at the trial that his mother was seeing werewolves on the night she attacked him and his brother. A five-judge panel of the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Kathleen McGarry and Casi Maloney of county Child Protective Services were working with law enforcement when they interviewed Wilhelm without her lawyer present and reported her comments to the district attorney's office. They said Wilhelm told them she knew what she was doing was wrong but did it anyway. The 16-page decision, written by Justice Thomas E. Mercure, said defense attorney Jerry Frost was correct in arguing that the two case workers' trial testimony should not have been allowed. It stated that the CPS workers "had 'a cooperative working arrangement' with and were acting as agents of the police and prosecutor in interviewing and relaying her incriminating status." Subsequent History: Christine Wilhelm pleaded not guilty on September 13, 2006, citing mental illness, in a deal reached with prosecutors. Wilhelm will be sent to a psychiatric facility where she could spend the rest of her life. Rensselaer County District Attorney Patricia DeAngelis agreed to the deal three weeks after an appeals court tossed Wilhelm's conviction. Judge Patrick McGrath turned Wilhelm over to the state Commission on Mental Health to be placed in a secure mental facility at the Mid-Hudson Psychiatric Center in Orange County. Within 30 days, she will get an examination by two independent psychiatrists. That report will be returned to the judge who then will have 10 days to schedule a hearing to determine whether Wilhelm suffers from a dangerous mental disorder that would keep her in the facility. She will have another evaluation within six months, another within a year and every two years after that. Source: Albany Times Union (New York), June 6, 2002 Albany Times Union, 5/29/03, 6/3/03, 6/19/03, 7/8/03, 7/8/06, 8/14/06, 8/25/06, 8/27/06, 8/30/06, 9/13/06, 9/15/06, 9/17/06;Saratogian, 7/10/03; The Daily Gazette, 7/10/03

 

Date: 1/2000

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Chris Pollard, 21, of Brooklyn, was sentenced after being convicted of attempted rape, burglary and assault charges related to his attack on a 49-year-old nanny at the West 46th Street home of Thomas Winberry. On January 1, 2000, Pollard was sent to Winberry's home to deliver a package and attacked and choked the nanny after forcing his way into the house. Winberry returned home while Pollard was there, and Pollard attacked him as well, slashing him across the face, inflicting a gash that required 50 stiches to close. State Supreme Court Justice Bonnie Wittner said psychiatric tests show that Pollard has "a major psychotic disorder, possibly schizophrenia," and that "he is a threat to himself and others." The judge designated Pollard a "predicate violent felon", directed that he receive psychiatric treatment in prison and be supervised for five years after his release, and ordered him registered as a sex offender. Source: The Associated Press, October 20, 2000

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Thomas Hollis, a 53-year-old man with schizophrenia, punched Sgt. Olivia Coughlin on May 7, 2004 in New Rochelle, NY, permanently injuring her back and forcing her into retirement from the police department. Hollis was acting strangely across the street from Police Headquarters when Coughlin drove up to him to see what was wrong. Hollis grabbed Coughlin through the car window and tried pulling her out. When Coughlin struggled to get free of Hollis, he punched her in the head and ran off. Then he cut himself punching a window at a funeral home and was arrested at a hospital after police linked him to the attack on Coughlin. Subsequent History: On March 1, 2005, Hollis pleaded not responsible by reason of mental illness to the assault charge after doctors for the defense and prosecution agreed that his mental illness had kept him from understanding what he was doing. State Supreme Court Justice Janet DiFiore ordered him into the custody of the state Department of Mental Health. He will be evaluated routinely to determine if he remains a threat to the community. Prior History: Hollis has a history of mental illness since the late 1970s and has had 31 convictions, mostly for misdemeanors, during the past 35 years. Source: The Journal News (NY) March 1, 2005

 

Date: 3/2005

Location: New York, , NY

Summary: On March 28, 2005, a homeless man was arrested for trying to smuggle a BB gun into a federal building in New York City so he could shoot Social Security clerks for cutting off his benefits. Daniel O'Brien, 38, told investigators he brought the weapon "so he could intimidate Social Security employees if necessary," but added he had no qualms about using it. O'Brien, who suffers from bipolar disorder and lives in a homeless shelter on Staten Island, was being held without bail by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons. He was arrested by the Federal Protective Service and arraigned before a federal magistrate. Prior History: Law enforcement sources said O'Brien had served time in federal prison previously. His name was on a Secret Service watch list because he had made verbal threats against President Bush in 2002. Source: New York Daily News, March 29, 2005

 

Date: 4/2005

Location: New York, , NY

Summary: Russell Martinez, 41, an emotionally disturbed Rhode Island man disrupted Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral on April 4, 2005 trying to get a letter to Cardinal Edward Egan in which the man demanded to be the next Pope. Police responded and escorted Martinez, of Warwick, R.I., out of the cathedral about 6:45p.m. He was brought to Bellevue Hospital for psychiatric evaluation. As Egan celebrated Mass, Martinez shouted and tried to give him a letter with instructions on who should be Pope John Paul II's replacement. Martinez, an honors graduate of Boston University, suffered from schizophrenia, and had been off his medication for about a year, his parents said. Source: New York Daily News, April 5, 2005

 

Date: 8/2004

Location: Elmhurst, Queens, NY

Summary: On August 6, 2004, Robert Marshall, diagnosed with bipolar disorder, attacked 88-year-old Antoinette Russo and then smothered her with a mattress when she surprised him as he was robbing her home. Marshall helped himself to lunch and a shower as Russo lay dying. "I left with 20 bucks, a full stomach and a bath," he told police. Subsequent History: On April 6, 2005, the 25-year-old Marshall was declared incompetent to stand trial and ordered to a psychiatric center. A psychiatric report found that Marshall suffered from drug addiction and several psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder. Marshall had served time on robbery, drugs and weapons charges. Subsequent History: On June 29, 2011, 31-year-old Robert Marshall was sentenced to 15 years in prison. Until recently, doctors had considered the bipolar Marshall mentally unfit to stand trial for the August 2004 slaying. After he was declared fit, he pleaded guilty. Source: New York Daily News, 4/7/05; New York Daily News, 6/30/11

 

Date: 4/2005

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: John Cox, 39-year-old man with a long history of mental illness, died on April 22, 2005 after an altercation with Suffolk County (NY) police, in which he was shocked five times with a Taser. Police had responded to a 911 call made by someone inside Cox's girlfriend's house in Rocky Point, NY after Cox became agitated. One witness said the trouble started because Cox had forgotten to take his medication that day and began raving and punched a wall, but Cox' s brother said he had taken his medication. Suffolk police said that it took nine officers to subdue Cox, and the Taser gun did not affect him. All nine officers were treated and released for minor injuries. Cox, who had alcohol and cocaine in his blood at the time of his death, had been taking Zyprexa for his schizophrenia and acute bipolar mania, said his brother. Prior History: At 20, Cox had his first problem with police, which ended in a conviction for misdemeanor harassment in 1985. By the time he died, he had accumulated 22 convictions, mostly disorderly conduct and harassment. Although he never served more than a month at a time, Cox became a frequent visitor to the Suffolk County jail in Riverhead until the late 1990s. Cox was also often a patient at the Kings Park Psychiatric Center and the Stony Brook University Hospital. His last hospitalization at the Kings Park facility was in early 2005, when he stayed for 30 days, then moved into a halfway house. Source: Long Island Newsday, April 25, 2005; Long Island Newsday, April 30, 2005

 

Date: 4/2005

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: John Cox, 39-year-old man with a long history of mental illness, died on April 22, 2005 after an altercation with Suffolk County (NY) police, in which he was shocked five times with a Taser. Police had responded to a 911 call made by someone inside Cox's girlfriend's house in Rocky Point, NY after Cox became agitated. One witness said the trouble started because Cox had forgotten to take his medication that day and began raving and punched a wall, but Cox' s brother said he had taken his medication. Suffolk police said that it took nine officers to subdue Cox, and the Taser gun did not affect him. All nine officers were treated and released for minor injuries. Cox, who had alcohol and cocaine in his blood at the time of his death, had been taking Zyprexa for his schizophrenia and acute bipolar mania, said his brother. Prior History: At 20, Cox had his first problem with police, which ended in a conviction for misdemeanor harassment in 1985. By the time he died, he had accumulated 22 convictions, mostly disorderly conduct and harassment. Although he never served more than a month at a time, Cox became a frequent visitor to the Suffolk County jail in Riverhead until the late 1990s. Cox was also often a patient at the Kings Park Psychiatric Center and the Stony Brook University Hospital. His last hospitalization at the Kings Park facility was in early 2005, when he stayed for 30 days, then moved into a halfway house. Source: Long Island Newsday, April 25, 2005; Long Island Newsday, April 30, 2005

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Sparta, Livingston, NY

Summary: In May 2004, 18-year-old Nathan Dewispelare admitted that he used a shotgun to kill his mother, Lizbeth, in the family home in Sparta, NY. Dewispelare, who suffers from schizophrenia, attacked his mother after she caught him trying cut a Ritalin pill and take it. A dispute between mother and son ensued. Hours later, Dewispelare shot his mother. Subsequent History: On May 5, 2005, Dewispelare pleaded guilty to manslaughter for shooting and killing his mother. He will serve 15 years in prison and five years parole. A Livingston County grand jury had indicted Dewispelare and reported there was enough evidence in the case to charge him with murder. However, after the victim's family advocated leniency for Dewispelare, he agreed to plead guilty to manslaughter. Source: RNEWS-TV, May 5, 2005

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Kirsten M. Vanderlinde, a 36-year-old North Buffalo, NY resident, was charged with murdering her 7-month-old daughter, Melissa, on May 27, 2004 by repeatedly slamming the baby into a sidewalk. Vanderlinde, who has schizophrenia, had stopped taking her medication about two weeks before the murder. Vanderlinde had been diagnosed in her mid-twenties with the illness and hospitalized multiple times. She was charged with second-degree murder and placed on a suicide watch. Shortly before the attack, a police officer drove Vanderlinde home after finding her walking around outside in her nightgown, carrying her baby. The officer said she went with Vanderlinde into her apartment, where she said Vanderlinde answered questions appropriately. Subsequent History: On March 8, 2005, Vanderlinde was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Erie County Judge Shirley Troutman, who heard the case without a jury, cited "voluminous" records that documented Vanderlinde's frequent psychiatric hospitalizations in the years before the attack, as well as her behavior in the days that followed. While in jail, Vanderlinde tried eating a mattress and drank from a toilet, appeared to rock and feed an invisible baby and asked to make a phone call to check on Melissa, the judge noted. She ordered Vanderlinde committed to a secure mental health institution and further psychiatric evaluation. Prior History: After Vanderlinde became pregnant in early 2003, she went off at least some of her medication because she feared it could harm her unborn child, several sources said. She also stopped taking her medication several other times, deciding on her own that she didn't want to take it, her friend Shirley Ford said. "She'd be suicidal. She'd become real agitated . . . She was a totally different person when she was off her medication," Ford said. More than once, paramedics took her to Erie County Medical Center or Buffalo General Hospital. Source: Buffalo News (NY), June 6, 2004; Brattleboro Reformer (AP), March 1, 2005; Long Island Newsday, March 8, 2005

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Elmsford, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison, and Morgan accepted the plea bargain, unwilling to have the court case continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's court-appointed attorney, Robin Bauer, said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Subsequent History: Morgan, 51, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Source: White Plains Journal News, April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Elmsford, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison, and Morgan accepted the plea bargain, unwilling to have the court case continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's court-appointed attorney, Robin Bauer, said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Subsequent History: Morgan, 51, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Source: White Plains Journal News, April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Elmsford, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison, and Morgan accepted the plea bargain, unwilling to have the court case continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's court-appointed attorney, Robin Bauer, said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Subsequent History: Morgan, 51, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Source: White Plains Journal News, April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Elmsford, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dennis Morgan, a man suffering from paranoid schizophrenia who took daily medication for about 20 years, was charged with arson and assault after he set fire to the apartment he shared with his terminally ill, mother, who also suffered from schizophrenia, in a 14-unit building in Elmsford, NY in April 2002. The blaze injured two firefighters and endangered building residents. After the fire, nurses discovered puncture wounds on his mother's stomach. She told them her son had stabbed her the night before, and Morgan was then also charged with felony assault. His lawyer argued that Morgan's mental condition was a mitigating factor and tried to get him treatment and probation. Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro insisted he serve at least five years in prison, and Morgan accepted the plea bargain, unwilling to have the court case continue with no resolution for an extended period of time. Morgan's court-appointed attorney, Robin Bauer, said his case is a prime example of the need for a mental-health court in the county. Several people familiar with his case believe that Morgan stabbed his mother and lit the fire in a failed attempt at mercy killing and suicide. Subsequent History: Morgan, 51, committed suicide on December 8, 2003 at the Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, NY, where he had been placed in the general prison population several months earlier, despite his mental illness and two known previous suicide attempts. Morgan was found alone in his cell, bleeding from a cutting wound to his throat. He died several hours later. Source: White Plains Journal News, April 14, 2004 The Journal News.com, April 19, 2004

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: Watkins Glen, Schuyler, NY

Summary: Chad Mack pleaded guilty to murder and robbery charges in the August 2002 shooting death of Teresa M. Ford in Schuyler County, NY. The assault, which took place in Ford's home, ended a two-day crime spree that began in Cattaraugus County earlier that month. Mack and two other accomplices allegedly robbed a cab driver in Ellicottville, NY before murdering Ford. Mack later asked to recant his plea, claiming he didn't understand the court process. Since his arrest in September 2002, Mack told four psychiatrists and one psychologist that he heard voices, saw spirits and had flashbacks about what happened the night Ford died, and believed the spirits interfered with his defense. Schuyler County Judge J.C. Argetsinger eventually ruled that Mack understood what he was doing when he pleaded guilty. He based his decision primarily on the testimony of psychiatrists Mihai Dasculu, of the Schuyler County Mental Health Department, and Gary Horwitz, a forensic psychiatrist from Rochester hired by the state to examine Mack. Dasculu, who had treated Mack since November 2002, concluded that he suffered from schizophrenia but nevertheless was competent to proceed with trial. Subsequent History: Argetsinger's ruling that Mack will not be able to withdraw his courtroom confession means Mack faces 25 years to life in prison for second-degree murder and first-degree robbery. Subsequent History: In April 2007, Chad Mack, convicted of a 2002 murder, was granted an appeal. Mack was sentenced to 25 years to life for his role in the robbery and murder of Teresa Ford, a Town of Orange woman. The appeal was granted because after Mack pleaded guilty he requested a change of council that was initially denied. Six months later, Mack was finally granted Susan Betzjitomir as his legal council. Betzjitomer said she is thrilled with the appellate court's decision. "There were a lot of procedures that happened in between that didn't go his way and I argued he would have had a much better chance if the attorney he wanted had represented him," said Betzjitomir. The case will resume from the point where Mack requested a change of council. Betzjitomir said Mack suffers from diagnosed schizophrenia, and at the time of his plea he wasn't in his right mind. "Chad Mack was sentenced harshly and he was sentenced with no plea bargain I think which is evidence that he really didn't know what he was doing," said Betzjitomir. Prior History: In June 2004, Chad Mack and Elizabeth Kettle were found guilty of robbing and murdering Ford. Source: Star-Gazette (Elmira, NY), 5/1/04; The Leader (NY), 6/5/04; WENY.com, 4/6/07

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: A man with mental illness who was high on marijuana attacked his mother with a kitchen knife in her Brooklyn, NY home on May 7, 2004. The victim, 47-year-old Jamaican immigrant Yvonne Stewart, was stabbed in the back and limbs by her son Kevon Stewart, 21. She then walked to her neighbor's lawn while naked and bleeding. She was critically wounded but survived the attack. Kevon Stewart was charged with first-degree assault and weapon possession. Family members said Kevon Stewart, who had no prior arrests, has schizophrenia with a history of drug abuse. Eyewitnesses described him as "totally deranged." Source: The New York Post May 8, 2004

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: New York City police arrested Akeem Capers, 20, on May 14, 2004 for the alleged stabbing death of his grandmother in Brooklyn and the attempted rape of another woman. Capers, who is from Greensboro, NC, has schizophrenia and had lived in a group home until early April 2004. Capers was arrested at a subway station in Manhattan after plain-clothes officers saw him throw a man onto the tracks, according to police. He was trying to push another man when officers captured him, police said. Police also reported that Capers' grandfather had found his 65-year-old wife, Alice Wise, dead on the kitchen floor on May 13, 2004. She had three stab wounds to her neck and abdomen. Police said that Capers was also suspected in an assault on a 34-year-old woman the same day of the stabbing in the condominium complex where his grandparents lived. Capers had left Greensboro the previous month for an extended visit to New York to see his dying father. Source: News & Record (Greensboro, NC), May 15, 2004

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: New York City police arrested Akeem Capers, 20, on May 14, 2004 for the alleged stabbing death of his grandmother in Brooklyn and the attempted rape of another woman. Capers, who is from Greensboro, NC, has schizophrenia and had lived in a group home until early April 2004. Capers was arrested at a subway station in Manhattan after plain-clothes officers saw him throw a man onto the tracks, according to police. He was trying to push another man when officers captured him, police said. Police also reported that Capers' grandfather had found his 65-year-old wife, Alice Wise, dead on the kitchen floor on May 13, 2004. She had three stab wounds to her neck and abdomen. Police said that Capers was also suspected in an assault on a 34-year-old woman the same day of the stabbing in the condominium complex where his grandparents lived. Capers had left Greensboro the previous month for an extended visit to New York to see his dying father. Source: News & Record (Greensboro, NC), May 15, 2004

 

Date: 5/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: New York City police arrested Akeem Capers, 20, on May 14, 2004 for the alleged stabbing death of his grandmother in Brooklyn and the attempted rape of another woman. Capers, who is from Greensboro, NC, has schizophrenia and had lived in a group home until early April 2004. Capers was arrested at a subway station in Manhattan after plain-clothes officers saw him throw a man onto the tracks, according to police. He was trying to push another man when officers captured him, police said. Police also reported that Capers' grandfather had found his 65-year-old wife, Alice Wise, dead on the kitchen floor on May 13, 2004. She had three stab wounds to her neck and abdomen. Police said that Capers was also suspected in an assault on a 34-year-old woman the same day of the stabbing in the condominium complex where his grandparents lived. Capers had left Greensboro the previous month for an extended visit to New York to see his dying father. Source: News & Record (Greensboro, NC), May 15, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Scarsdale, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 18, 2004, Philip Wald, a bipolar disorder sufferer from Brooklyn, NY, was convicted of sexual abuse and sentenced to seven years in state prison for making random obscene phone calls to teenage girls and forcing them to perform sexual acts with the threat that he was watching and would punish them if they didn't comply. Wald, 36, pleaded guilty to first-degree sexual abuse and first-degree coercion in February 2004, admitting that he threatened six teenage girls. The first victim was a 17-year-old New Castle girl in September 2001. He made similar calls to two 14-year-old New Castle girls, a 13-year-old Scarsdale girl, a 12-year-old Mamaroneck girl and a 15-year-old Pleasantville girl. Wald, whose family had tried for years to get him to stop his manic phone calling, said he needed treatment to help him understand why he does such things. Wald was miles from any of the victims and they were never in imminent danger when he made the phone calls during 2001 and 2002. But Assistant District Attorney Laura Murphy charged him with sexual abuse under the theory that he subjected the girls to physical contact they would not have engaged in otherwise, and his conviction was believed to be the first of that nature in New York state. The sexual abuse conviction will also force him to register as a sex offender when he is released from prison. Source: The Journal News.com, May 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Carmine Randazzo Sr., 78, was stabbed five times in the arm, back and torso on September 16, 2006 after visiting a Queens flea market during his regular neighborhood stroll. William Scott, 28, allegedly jumped out from behind a building in Hillcrest and attacked Randazzo without provocation, a police source said. Scott, described by a relative as schizophrenic and on medication, was awaiting arraignment on charges of second-degree murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon. Scott, who sources said gave a full confession in Randazzo's murder, has prior convictions for robbery and criminal possession of a weapon. Prior History: Queens neighbors said Scott had a history of random public violence - and one woman said he once punched her husband in the head on the street. "My husband had just gotten his pacemaker put in. He was just walking to the store. He saw [Scott] and said hello to him, and [Scott] just cold-cocked him," said neighbor Justine Cullinan, 64, describing the brutal incident two years ago. "My husband fell on the ground and lost consciousness for a minute." Cullinan said she and husband Denis Cullinan, 63, did not report the incident out of sympathy for Scott's mother, a city correction officer. Other neighbors said Scott would roam the neighborhood, angrily cursing white people. Galda Rochleder said she once saw Scott attack a man with a bat, screaming, "You white m----------r!" "He's always muttering to himself, walking back and forth, when he sees white people," she said. "He'll say under his breath "You b-----ds, I hate you." Subsequent History: William Scott, the alleged assailant, told investigators that voices in his head told him to attack, a source said. "The guy just went off. It was completely unprovoked. He just pulled out a knife and started screaming and stabbing," a police source said. "It's one of those horrible, freakish things." After a brief standoff, Scott was taken into custody and given a psychiatric evaluation. Prior History: Scott was admitted to Bellevue Hospital on September 18, 2006 for observation. He was last in a mental institution in November 2005 when he was sprung from Creedmoor Psychiatric Center after a two-year stay, sources said. Scott soon resumed his bizarre behavior, neighbors and victims said. Neighbors said they watched Scott turn from a happy-go-lucky boy into a deranged young man who would yell racial slurs at white neighbors and then attack them. There were a dozen incidents in a decade, according to police records and witness and victim accounts. Christopher Rau experienced a 1998 run-in with Scott. Rau said he tried to get help for Scott, who regularly railed against whites, but never pressed charges. Rau recalled Scott coming after him with a baseball bat on a summer day eight years ago. "He called me a white f----t," Rau said. "He would have killed me if he'd gotten me. I was literally running as fast as I could; he rounded the corner, went right through the bushes and made a beeline for me. He swung at me. The only reason he didn't nail me was because I got the door closed before he could connect," Rau said. Rau, a health professional, arranged for Scott to be admitted to a mental health facility, but Scott's mother, Pamela Dunn, didn't want her son committed, he said. Just five days before Carmine Randazzo’s slaying, Scott allegedly knifed 48-year-old Lawrence Nelson blocks from where Randazzo was later killed. Nelson escaped with a slash on his right index finger. Scott was not caught, but Nelson later picked him out of a lineup after his arrest in Randazzo's slaying, police sources said. Scott's sister said her younger brother was diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was in prison for robbery at age 17. He complained that people's "spirits" were talking to him, but she usually could coax him out of his delusions, she said. "He's no psycho, he's my brother and he's ill," said Tamarra Scott. "He's been ill for years, and at the mercy of institutions his whole life." Source: NY Daily News, 9/17/06, 9/18/06, 9/19/06, 9/21/06; Newsday, 9/18/06, 9/20/06; New York Post, 9/17/06 & 9/18/06

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Hillsdale, Columbia, NY

Summary: On February 11, 2006, 23-year-old William S. Demagall fatally attacked retired high school teacher 56-year-old George Mancini. Mancini suffered multiple stab wounds to his chest and back but died of blunt force trauma to the head. After the murder, Demegall set the body on fire to hide evidence and left with some of Mancini's belongings. Hillsdale firefighters discovered the body when they were called to put out the fire that had spread throughout the apartment. Demagall, who has bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder, was arrested in Schodack on unrelated charges on February 13. Prior History: Prior to the incident, Demagall quit his job and went to live part-time in the woods. He was hospitalized at least three times in the three years prior to the murder, most recently on February 3, 2006, when his strange behavior became so noticeable that his mother and grandmother applied to have him committed. He escaped the secured psychiatric facility two days before the murder by squeezing between the bars. At that time, though he was supposed to be medicated, he was evidently not taking his meds. Demagall’s father said his son suffers from Bipolar Disorder, marked by episodes of manic behavior and delusions. Subsequent History: On December 8, 2006, a jury convicted William S. Demagall of second-degree murder, rejecting his insanity defense despite extensive psychiatric testimony, family members' observations of his bizarre behavior and his documented decline into Schizophrenic delusions during the past three years. Subsequent History: On March 21, 2007, William S. Demagall was sentenced to the maximum punishment, 25 years to life in prison. Subsequent History: In April 2009, the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court overturned William S. Demagall’s murder conviction and ordered a new trial for the 25-year-old. In its ruling, the Court ordered that Demagall, who had been incarcerated at Great Meadow Correctional Facility for the past two years, stand trial again before a different judge due to a “reversible error” in the court’s handling of the first psychiatrist who examined Demagall. Subsequent History: On November 9, 2010, William S. Demagall’s retrial began. Subsequent History: On March 22, 2011, 27-year-old William Demagall was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. Demagall had been found guilty in November of second-degree murder after a second trial for the stabbing and bludgeoning death of George Mancini. Demagall had escaped from a secure mental ward at Berkshire Medical Center in Massachusetts and hid in a cave just before the killing. Demagallstood trial despite being diagnosed as mentally ill. Mental evaluations presented at trial asserted Demagall suffered from Paranoid Schizophrenia and believed that he was at various times Robin Hood, Merlin, Sir Galahad of the Arthurian legends and a ninja. Source: The Independent, 9/19/06, 12/4/06; Berkshire Eagle, 9/21/06, 11/29/06, 11/30/06, 12/6/06, 12/9/06, 12/10/06, 12/14/06, 2/6/07, 3/22/07, 3/23/07; Daily Freeman, 4/3/09; TimesUnion.com, 11/10/10, 3/23/11

 

Date: 9/2006

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On September 30, 2006, Joseph Bernazard held Phyllis Fine at knifepoint and threatened to kill her on Brooklyn's trendy restaurant row before a sharpshooter cop killed him with a single bullet. Fine was within inches of her attacker when Officer Louis Gubitosi pulled the trigger and killed the 26-year-old man on the upscale block. Fine said Bernazard, who moments earlier had sliced another women's neck, never spoke to her as he held her by the hair. He instead yelled over and over, "Kill me now! I want to die!" Bernazard's family said he had a history of mental illness and had taken a turn for the worse recently. "They're after me," he told his sister Yolanda. The saga began when Bernazard, who was hallucinating and hearing voices in his head, was taken to Long Island College Hospital on September 30. But he tore out his IV and walked out of the hospital against doctors' wishes. He was still wearing his medical bracelet when he was killed. On the day of the incident, Bernazard grabbed Julie Jacobowitz, 32, a social worker talking on a cell phone with a friend as she walked home from the gym. "If they kill me, I won't have to hurt you," Bernazard told Jacobowitz, police sources said. But as he spoke, he was already slicing into her neck, causing her to scream in agony. A group of construction workers confronted Bernazard, who told them, "The cops are going to have to kill me." When police raced up seconds later, Bernazard pushed the bleeding 32-year-old woman away and ran about 2 blocks to the Met Food Market, where he grabbed Fine by the hair. "He started yelling, 'I'm going to kill her!' " Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said. Cops surrounded Bernazard outside the store. For 10 minutes, the cops tried to reason with Bernazard, telling him to drop the knife. But he refused and crouched down behind Fine. After the shooting, an ambulance took Bernazard back to the same hospital he had walked out of hours before. He was declared dead on arrival. His victims were not seriously hurt. Source: New York Daily News, October 1, 2006

 

Date: 9/2006

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On September 30, 2006, Joseph Bernazard held Phyllis Fine at knifepoint and threatened to kill her on Brooklyn's trendy restaurant row before a sharpshooter cop killed him with a single bullet. Fine was within inches of her attacker when Officer Louis Gubitosi pulled the trigger and killed the 26-year-old man on the upscale block. Fine said Bernazard, who moments earlier had sliced another women's neck, never spoke to her as he held her by the hair. He instead yelled over and over, "Kill me now! I want to die!" Bernazard's family said he had a history of mental illness and had taken a turn for the worse recently. "They're after me," he told his sister Yolanda. The saga began when Bernazard, who was hallucinating and hearing voices in his head, was taken to Long Island College Hospital on September 30. But he tore out his IV and walked out of the hospital against doctors' wishes. He was still wearing his medical bracelet when he was killed. On the day of the incident, Bernazard grabbed Julie Jacobowitz, 32, a social worker talking on a cell phone with a friend as she walked home from the gym. "If they kill me, I won't have to hurt you," Bernazard told Jacobowitz, police sources said. But as he spoke, he was already slicing into her neck, causing her to scream in agony. A group of construction workers confronted Bernazard, who told them, "The cops are going to have to kill me." When police raced up seconds later, Bernazard pushed the bleeding 32-year-old woman away and ran about 2 blocks to the Met Food Market, where he grabbed Fine by the hair. "He started yelling, 'I'm going to kill her!' " Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said. Cops surrounded Bernazard outside the store. For 10 minutes, the cops tried to reason with Bernazard, telling him to drop the knife. But he refused and crouched down behind Fine. After the shooting, an ambulance took Bernazard back to the same hospital he had walked out of hours before. He was declared dead on arrival. His victims were not seriously hurt. Source: New York Daily News, October 1, 2006

 

Date: 10/2006

Location: Long Island, Queens, NY

Summary: On October 9, 2006, Susanne Carlson, 70, was bludgeoned to death in her Long Island home by her son. Christopher Carlson, 39, dialed 911 after the attack and told police he had struck his elderly mother in the head in the bedroom of her West Islip home. Police arrived shortly after 3 a.m. and found a battered Susanne Carlson dead in her bed - beaten to death with an old-style military rifle. His attorney, Frank Murphy of Sayville, said his client suffers from depression and schizophrenia. He had run out of his medication during the past week, Murphy said. "He's very upset," Murphy said. "He's unable to sleep. Unable to eat." At his arraignment, Carlson was ordered held without bail. Prior History: Christopher Carlson was unemployed after a short stint in the military and lived with his mother and younger brother, Eric Carlson. Records show he has previous convictions for harassment and driving while intoxicated. "I'm shocked, but then I'm not shocked the way the kids are," said a neighbor. "She didn't like coming home. She was afraid for her life, basically." Source: Newsday, October 10, 2006

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 10/2006

Location: Plattsburgh, Clinton, NY

Summary: On October 28, 2006, Alphegina "Gina" Snide, 72 was found dead in the bedroom of her Mooers Forks home. She died of multiple blows to the head. David D. Couture, 28, was accused of her murder. Couture was brought back from Arizona to New York to face charges of second-degree murder and third-degree grand larceny in Mooers Town Court. Prior History: Couture was diagnosed in 2000 with severe bipolar disorder, major depression, social anxiety and borderline intellectual functioning, according to court records. But despite the mood disorders, his family and friends maintain that he had never shown any signs of violence in the past. In 2004, an Administrative Law judge approved Couture's disability application based on the medical opinions of five doctors. The doctors concurred with an earlier diagnosis and added that in 2004 he displayed suicidal ideations, poor sleep, racing thoughts, low self-esteem, high stress, guilt anxiety, low concentration, low energy and hypervigilance. In 2002, Couture was prescribed antidepressants and medication to help minimize the manic episodes. But, according to his family, Couture felt the side effects drastically affected his daily functioning so he would sometimes opt not to take them. He had sought additional treatment at CVPH Medical Center numerous times in the past, the family said, and was twice admitted to the Mental Health Unit. The other times, he was given additional prescriptions. According to a statement he gave Plattsburgh City Police about one day before he allegedly killed Snide, he hadn't been taking his medication for a long time. "The drinking and smoking has been taking a toll on me. I haven't been taking my medication at all," he told police after being charged with stealing from his aunt in Plattsburgh. "I have been feeling depressed and feeling out a place for a long time." When Couture was arrested for the Plattsburgh theft, he was about to board a bus that was en route to Phoenix. He was at the Plattsburgh City Police Station for an hour and a half, which was when he told police he was depressed. He was released by the police on his own recognizance, with an appearance ticket for City Court. Subsequent History: On September 5, 2007, David Couture was sentenced to 32 years to life in prison for murdering a former neighbor with a sledgehammer when he burglarized her home last year. Couture, who had been in Clinton County Jail since November, had pleaded guilty earlier this year to killing 72-year-old Alphegina Snide after he crawled through her window to steal money and jewelry. Source: Plattsburgh Press Republican, 11/4/06, 6/13/07; WSTM TV, 9/6/07

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Anatoly Dimitriev, a 62-year-old man was shot and killed in a confrontation with police on December 16, 2006. Neighbors said Dimitriev appeared to be mentally ill. They saw Dimitriev throwing bottles out his apartment window and chopping at trees with an ax in the courtyard of the co-op apartment building where he lived with his 41-year-old son in the city's Bronx borough. After receiving several emergency calls about an elderly man with a hatchet, police responded to Dimitriev's apartment building. By the time they arrived, Dimitriev had barricaded himself in his apartment, holding his son hostage. Police burst through the apartment door, and Dimitriev fled through a window onto the fire escape, leaving his unharmed son behind. Police followed Dimitriev, demanding he lay down the ax. When he began to come at police with the weapon, an officer shot him. Two bullets struck the 62-year-old in the abdomen. Dimitriev was taken to an area hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Source: Associated Press, December 18, 2006

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Anatoly Dimitriev, a 62-year-old man was shot and killed in a confrontation with police on December 16, 2006. Neighbors said Dimitriev appeared to be mentally ill. They saw Dimitriev throwing bottles out his apartment window and chopping at trees with an ax in the courtyard of the co-op apartment building where he lived with his 41-year-old son in the city's Bronx borough. After receiving several emergency calls about an elderly man with a hatchet, police responded to Dimitriev's apartment building. By the time they arrived, Dimitriev had barricaded himself in his apartment, holding his son hostage. Police burst through the apartment door, and Dimitriev fled through a window onto the fire escape, leaving his unharmed son behind. Police followed Dimitriev, demanding he lay down the ax. When he began to come at police with the weapon, an officer shot him. Two bullets struck the 62-year-old in the abdomen. Dimitriev was taken to an area hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Source: Associated Press, December 18, 2006

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: On December 31, 2006, an Erie County sheriff's deputy fatally shot Roger S. Duchnik after he repeatedly lunged at the deputy and his partner with a hunting knife. Deputies James Mirusso and Benjamin Pisa were investigating a complaint from a resident of an apartment complex on North Buffalo Street who reported that another resident, Duchnik, was threatening people. The person making the complaint described Duchnik, 52, as mentally ill and off his medication. The deputies tracked Duchnik to his mother's home on Springville-Boston Road in Concord, where they encountered him at the bottom of a steep driveway. They followed Duchnik as he ran up the driveway and ordered him to take his hands out of his pockets. Duchnik turned back toward the deputies and pulled out a knife about 8 inches long and began lunging at the deputies. Mirusso backed up and fell down a 15-foot embankment after Duchnik swiped near his midsection. Believing his partner had been cut and fearing for his own life, Pisa fired at least three rounds from his handgun, killing Duchnik. Source: Buffalo News, January 1 & 3, 2007

 

Date: 12/2006

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: On December 31, 2006, an Erie County sheriff's deputy fatally shot Roger S. Duchnik after he repeatedly lunged at the deputy and his partner with a hunting knife. Deputies James Mirusso and Benjamin Pisa were investigating a complaint from a resident of an apartment complex on North Buffalo Street who reported that another resident, Duchnik, was threatening people. The person making the complaint described Duchnik, 52, as mentally ill and off his medication. The deputies tracked Duchnik to his mother's home on Springville-Boston Road in Concord, where they encountered him at the bottom of a steep driveway. They followed Duchnik as he ran up the driveway and ordered him to take his hands out of his pockets. Duchnik turned back toward the deputies and pulled out a knife about 8 inches long and began lunging at the deputies. Mirusso backed up and fell down a 15-foot embankment after Duchnik swiped near his midsection. Believing his partner had been cut and fearing for his own life, Pisa fired at least three rounds from his handgun, killing Duchnik. Source: Buffalo News, January 1 & 3, 2007

 

Date: 1/2007

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In January 2007, Blondel Lassegue, an emotionally disturbed Brooklyn man, died of a heart attack after being Maced and Tasered by the police. A relative called the police when Lassegue was acting up at his uncle's house in Queens, saying he was depressed and delusional, he had recently gone off medication for bipolar disorder and depression. The police had difficulty in restraining 38 year old Lassegue; when the Mace did not subdue Lassegue, they Tasered him. Lasssegue then had a heart attack and was pronounced dead at a Long Island Hospital. Four officers were injured and three were hospitalized with non-serious injuries. Lassegue, who graduated from Hunter College and was recently ordained as a minister through a church in Las Vegas, had been upset over the recent deaths of his mother and grandmother. Lassegue's family says they will be consulting with a lawyer. Source: Gothamist, January 8, 2007; Precinct Flushing Times, January 25, 2007

 

Date: 1/2007

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In January 2007, Blondel Lassegue, an emotionally disturbed Brooklyn man, died of a heart attack after being Maced and Tasered by the police. A relative called the police when Lassegue was acting up at his uncle's house in Queens, saying he was depressed and delusional, he had recently gone off medication for bipolar disorder and depression. The police had difficulty in restraining 38 year old Lassegue; when the Mace did not subdue Lassegue, they Tasered him. Lasssegue then had a heart attack and was pronounced dead at a Long Island Hospital. Four officers were injured and three were hospitalized with non-serious injuries. Lassegue, who graduated from Hunter College and was recently ordained as a minister through a church in Las Vegas, had been upset over the recent deaths of his mother and grandmother. Lassegue's family says they will be consulting with a lawyer. Source: Gothamist, January 8, 2007; Precinct Flushing Times, January 25, 2007

 

Date: 2/2007

Location: Hicksville, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 17, 2007, Harvey L. Holmes III, 42, allegedly committed a series of assaults, including an attack on an 11-year-old girl. The attacks on women and the girl happened over a span of a couple hours. The little girl was grabbed when she entered a supermarket with her mother at 2:15 p.m., Nassau County police said. "He grabbed her from behind, took her and thrust her up against his body and made kind of a grinding motion against her,'' police Detective Lt. Kevin Smith said. The other victims, ranging in age from 19 to 46, were held and fondled in three parking lots and a convenience store over the next half-hour, police said in a report. Officers found Holmes driving near a mall, where he hit another car but didn't stop, police said. He was chased by car before he pulled over, they said. Holmes was charged with sexual abuse, unlawful imprisonment, endangering the welfare of a child, menacing and forcible touching, failing to stop for a police officer, and leaving the scene of an accident. He was to be arraigned on February 17 in Hempstead. Holmes’ father, Harvey L. Holmes, Jr., said that his son is not a sexual predator but suffers from mental illness and should not have been released from a psychiatric ward. The elder Holmes acknowledged that what his son had done was wrong. But he said there was another side to the story. "He's very mentally ill, and the system has really not helped him.'' His son, the elder Holmes said, had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized at Nassau University Medical Center's psychiatric unit on December 30 but later released on January 25. He said that his son should never have been out. Source: Local CBS, 2/19/07

 

Date: 2/2007

Location: Hicksville, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 17, 2007, Harvey L. Holmes III, 42, allegedly committed a series of assaults, including an attack on an 11-year-old girl. The attacks on women and the girl happened over a span of a couple hours. The little girl was grabbed when she entered a supermarket with her mother at 2:15 p.m., Nassau County police said. "He grabbed her from behind, took her and thrust her up against his body and made kind of a grinding motion against her,'' police Detective Lt. Kevin Smith said. The other victims, ranging in age from 19 to 46, were held and fondled in three parking lots and a convenience store over the next half-hour, police said in a report. Officers found Holmes driving near a mall, where he hit another car but didn't stop, police said. He was chased by car before he pulled over, they said. Holmes was charged with sexual abuse, unlawful imprisonment, endangering the welfare of a child, menacing and forcible touching, failing to stop for a police officer, and leaving the scene of an accident. He was to be arraigned on February 17 in Hempstead. Holmes’ father, Harvey L. Holmes, Jr., said that his son is not a sexual predator but suffers from mental illness and should not have been released from a psychiatric ward. The elder Holmes acknowledged that what his son had done was wrong. But he said there was another side to the story. "He's very mentally ill, and the system has really not helped him.'' His son, the elder Holmes said, had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized at Nassau University Medical Center's psychiatric unit on December 30 but later released on January 25. He said that his son should never have been out. Source: Local CBS, 2/19/07

 

Date: 2/2007

Location: Hicksville, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 17, 2007, Harvey L. Holmes III, 42, allegedly committed a series of assaults, including an attack on an 11-year-old girl. The attacks on women and the girl happened over a span of a couple hours. The little girl was grabbed when she entered a supermarket with her mother at 2:15 p.m., Nassau County police said. "He grabbed her from behind, took her and thrust her up against his body and made kind of a grinding motion against her,'' police Detective Lt. Kevin Smith said. The other victims, ranging in age from 19 to 46, were held and fondled in three parking lots and a convenience store over the next half-hour, police said in a report. Officers found Holmes driving near a mall, where he hit another car but didn't stop, police said. He was chased by car before he pulled over, they said. Holmes was charged with sexual abuse, unlawful imprisonment, endangering the welfare of a child, menacing and forcible touching, failing to stop for a police officer, and leaving the scene of an accident. He was to be arraigned on February 17 in Hempstead. Holmes’ father, Harvey L. Holmes, Jr., said that his son is not a sexual predator but suffers from mental illness and should not have been released from a psychiatric ward. The elder Holmes acknowledged that what his son had done was wrong. But he said there was another side to the story. "He's very mentally ill, and the system has really not helped him.'' His son, the elder Holmes said, had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized at Nassau University Medical Center's psychiatric unit on December 30 but later released on January 25. He said that his son should never have been out. Source: Local CBS, 2/19/07

 

Date: 2/2007

Location: Hicksville, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 17, 2007, Harvey L. Holmes III, 42, allegedly committed a series of assaults, including an attack on an 11-year-old girl. The attacks on women and the girl happened over a span of a couple hours. The little girl was grabbed when she entered a supermarket with her mother at 2:15 p.m., Nassau County police said. "He grabbed her from behind, took her and thrust her up against his body and made kind of a grinding motion against her,'' police Detective Lt. Kevin Smith said. The other victims, ranging in age from 19 to 46, were held and fondled in three parking lots and a convenience store over the next half-hour, police said in a report. Officers found Holmes driving near a mall, where he hit another car but didn't stop, police said. He was chased by car before he pulled over, they said. Holmes was charged with sexual abuse, unlawful imprisonment, endangering the welfare of a child, menacing and forcible touching, failing to stop for a police officer, and leaving the scene of an accident. He was to be arraigned on February 17 in Hempstead. Holmes’ father, Harvey L. Holmes, Jr., said that his son is not a sexual predator but suffers from mental illness and should not have been released from a psychiatric ward. The elder Holmes acknowledged that what his son had done was wrong. But he said there was another side to the story. "He's very mentally ill, and the system has really not helped him.'' His son, the elder Holmes said, had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized at Nassau University Medical Center's psychiatric unit on December 30 but later released on January 25. He said that his son should never have been out. Source: Local CBS, 2/19/07

 

Date: 2/2007

Location: Hicksville, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 17, 2007, Harvey L. Holmes III, 42, allegedly committed a series of assaults, including an attack on an 11-year-old girl. The attacks on women and the girl happened over a span of a couple hours. The little girl was grabbed when she entered a supermarket with her mother at 2:15 p.m., Nassau County police said. "He grabbed her from behind, took her and thrust her up against his body and made kind of a grinding motion against her,'' police Detective Lt. Kevin Smith said. The other victims, ranging in age from 19 to 46, were held and fondled in three parking lots and a convenience store over the next half-hour, police said in a report. Officers found Holmes driving near a mall, where he hit another car but didn't stop, police said. He was chased by car before he pulled over, they said. Holmes was charged with sexual abuse, unlawful imprisonment, endangering the welfare of a child, menacing and forcible touching, failing to stop for a police officer, and leaving the scene of an accident. He was to be arraigned on February 17 in Hempstead. Holmes’ father, Harvey L. Holmes, Jr., said that his son is not a sexual predator but suffers from mental illness and should not have been released from a psychiatric ward. The elder Holmes acknowledged that what his son had done was wrong. But he said there was another side to the story. "He's very mentally ill, and the system has really not helped him.'' His son, the elder Holmes said, had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia and was hospitalized at Nassau University Medical Center's psychiatric unit on December 30 but later released on January 25. He said that his son should never have been out. Source: Local CBS, 2/19/07

 

Date: /2002

Location: Northport, Suffolk County, NY

Summary: Cindy Bernhardt, 38, of Northport, NY, was arraigned in Suffolk County Court on charges of second-degree conspiracy and criminal solicitation for enlisting the services of what she believed to be a hit man to kill her husband, Thomas Bernhardt. The hit man was actually an undercover police officer. She could be sentenced to a maximum of 8 to 25 years in prison if convicted. Bernhardt suffers from bipolar disorder according to her niece, Stephanie Anaya, who lived with the couple for years. Anaya said her aunt has not always acknowledged her mental illness. Bernhardt's lawyer said he was unfamiliar with his client's psychiatric history, but said she does take antidepressants. Source: Newsday, September 4, 2002

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Schenectady, Schenectady, NY

Summary: Chevena Polite, 16, has been charged second-degree murder in the death of a 52-year-old man who police said was lured to an apartment by Polite and a married couple to have sex and was then beaten to death after a dispute arose over payment. Hours before the murder on February 1, 2003, Polite's mother said she went there to rescue her - only to be arrested and charged with trespassing. Polite, whose mother says she was being drugged and prostituted by Stacey Adamson, 32, and his wife, Taryn Blair-Admanson, 19, pleaded not guilty at her arraignment and was sent to the Schenectady County jail without bail. The three alleged killers drove victim Daniel Jamison's body to Queens, left it in a trash bin and drove off in Jamison's sport utility vehicle. They were arrested February 10, 2003 in Eastland, Texas. Polite's mother says that since Polite was arrested, her daughter has been denied her medication for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Polite denied involvement in the murder. Source: The Times Union (Albany, NY) February 28, 2003 The Times Union (Albany, NY) March 13, 2004

 

Date: 5/2003

Location: Mastic, Suffolk, NY

Summary: William Sancimo, 52, was charged with second-degree murder in the stabbing death of his mother, Jennie Citera, 73, on May 6, 2003 in her Mastic, New York home. Sancimo was arrested a day after his mother was found dead with more than 80 stab wounds in her face and torso, and he pleaded not guilty at his arraignment in Suffolk County Court. Sancimo has suffered from manic depression, paranoia and schizophrenia for most of his life, his brother said, and had a history of hospitalizations since age 15. Police said Sancimo had been a patient at Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center for six months shortly before Citera's murder. Prior to their mother's death, Sancimo's brother said state officials were unresponsive when he called them to try to get Sancimo back into the hospital after his February 2003 release. Citera's family filed notice of their plan to sue New York State and Pilgrim State Hospital for failing to properly treat and monitor Sancimo following his release. A judge ruled in August, 2003 that Sancimo was mentally imcompetent to stand trial and was to undergo further psychiatric evaluation for four months. At the end of that period, Acting State Supreme Court Justice Michael Mullen will determine if Sancimo is capable of going forward. Since Sancimo's arraignment, his attorney Anthony La Pinta has maintained that his client is not mentally stable. In July, 2003, Sancimo attacked a psychiatrist at Kirby Forensic Psychiatric Center in Manhattan as the doctor was evaluating him. Assistant District Attorney Janet Albertson said she did not object to Mullen's ruling. Source: Newsday (New York), June 7, 2003 Newsday, June 27, 2003 Newsday, August 21, 2003

 

Date: 6/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Dawn Mitchell, 46, was charged with fatally stabbing her sister, Ruby, 49, a Brooklyn church worker, capping a long-running feud during a furious argument on June 19, 2003. Dawn was also wounded in the neck, but cops said it was not clear if her injuries were self-inflicted. Neighbors said Ruby, who had devoted her life to helping her sister battle her mental problems, had gone to Dawn's house after the younger woman was sent home from her job at a senior-citizens center because of strange behavior. Ruby, who had often asked co-workers to pray for her sister, was stabbed in the neck and chest. Source: New York Post, June 24, 2003

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: Bronx, Kings, NY

Summary: Morgan McHenry, 35, a man with a history of psychological problems, attacked his 69-year-old mother in their Bronx, NY home on July 18, 2003. McHenry assaulted his mother during an argument, clawed at her face, dislodged her right eye and ripped out the left one, police said. Police arrested McHenry at the scene and charged him with first-degree assault. McHenry's sister said he suffers from bipolar disorder but was never prescribed medication. His mother was taken to Jacobi Medical Center, where she was listed in stable condition but may lose sight in both eyes, police said. McHenry was taken to Bellevue Hospital for evaluation. Source: Daily News (New York) July 19, 2003 Newsday (New York) July 19, 2003

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: Freeport, Nassau, NY

Summary: Michelle Sambriski, 34, and her 2-year-old daughter, Gina, were found dead on July 23, 2003 in Sambriski's cousin's Freeport, NY home, where they had been living for the past four months. Sambriski's cousin found Gina's body lying face down in the bathtub, and officers searching the home later found Sambriski hanging in the garage, police said. Sambriski left behind a note that provided detectives with enough information to conclude that she had drowned her daughter and then killed herself. The child's father, Brian Ramirez, had reported Sambriski to Nassau County child protective services two months earlier when he learned that she had been evicted from her apartment and had gone off medication for her bipolar disorder. A subsequent investigation failed to show any incidents of abuse or neglect and was closed weeks later. In 2002, Sambriski and Ramirez were due in family court to discuss visitation, the Ramirez family said, but Sambriski never showed up. Ramirez had planned to go to Nassau Family Court on July 29, 2003, to again petition for visitation. Ramizer has filed a lawsuit against Nassau County, claiming Child Protective Services failed to heed his warnings about the mother's instability. Susbsequent History: An April 2004 report on Gina Sambriski's death by the state Office of Children and Family Services criticized Nassau's Department of Social Services for closing the case prematurely - without confirming Sambriski's psychological history, as the girl's father had detailed. Other mistakes included the worker's failure to ask Sambriski to release her medical records to see if she was seeking mental health treatment. The abuse investigator also never interviewed relatives who would have been familiar with her emotional problems, even though Ramirez provided a list. Had he contacted Sambriski's mother, he might also have found out Sambriski had previously attempted suicide, county police records show. The investigator also never pursued why she recently had been evicted or even how she was supporting herself and her daughter. Source: Newsday (New York), July 25, 2003 Newsday, September 7, 2003 Newsday, August 23, 2004

 

Date: 1/2001

Location: Ridgewood, Queens, NY

Summary: Luis Perez, 21, who has a history of mental problems, admitted killing his mother's girlfriend Juanita Hernandez on January 23, 2001, by stabbing and then strangling her in the Ridgewood, NY, home they all shared. He was sentenced to 13 years in prison after pleading guilty to manslaughter. Justice Robert J. Hanophy of State Supreme Court also requested that Perez undergo psychiatric treatment. Hanophy heard two days of testimony, including comments from Perez's mother, who pleaded with him to spare her son a long sentence. Perez was diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenic with clinical depression, and told a psychiatrist that he killed Hernandez because he thought she had him raped by two men the night before - something both sides say was a delusion. Prosecution and defense lawyers agreed Perez was mentally ill. But he didn't fit the typical "not responsible by reason of mental defect or disease" profile, prosecutor Barry Weinrib said. Source: Daily News (New York), July 25, 2003 New York Times, July 29, 2003

 

Date: 8/2003

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Kim, an emotionally disturbed 22-year-old man, was shot by police on August 27, 2003 in the Pelham Parkway section of the Bronx. NYPD officers were called to a home to break up an argument between Kim and his brother, Chin. According to police, Kim, who suffers from schizophrenia, paranoia and anxiety, approached officers with a shovel, prompting them to fire two shots at him. Kim was hit once in the hip and once in the thigh. He was taken to Jacobi Medical Center where he underwent surgery. One officer was also taken to the hospital and treated for trauma. Kim's brother, who summoned police, disputed their account. "It was an unprovoked, unjustified shooting," said Chin Kim, a college student. "When I called 911, I told them he was suicidal, he wasn't going to hurt anybody around him." The family also claims Kim warned police he was coming out of the building and that he was just holding the shovel. Police say Kim ignored their orders to drop the 5-foot-long shovel and instead lunged at them with it. Chin Kim says he never heard the officers give a warning. The Kim family is now thinking of filing a lawsuit against the NYPD. The day before the incident, police, paramedics and Michael Kim's case worker had taken him to Jacobi's mental health emergency room because he was acting irrationally. Source: News 12 Long Island, August 28, 2003 Daily News (New York), August 29, 2003

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: Necati N. Harsit, a 41-year-old Rochester, NY, man, was arrested after he allegedly bought an unloaded 9mm pistol from an undercover Rochester police officer in March 2002 and said that he intended to use it to kill a City Court Judge. Harsit was later diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, declared mentally unfit for trial and committed to the secure forensic unit of Rochester Psychiatric Center in August 2002. In September 2003, Justice Kenneth R. Fisher ordered that Harsit be held for one more year at the Center after hearing evidence that Harsit refused to take medication and believed he was being kept in custody to prevent him from breaking up a pornography ring involving Fisher, the prosecutor and his lawyer. In a letter, Harsit also said that two previous psychiatrists had stolen his body organs and were selling them to a business school. Fisher found that Harsit didn't understand the charges against him and couldn't help his lawyer with a defense. Subsequent History: In September 2004, after hearing testimony that Harsit suffers from chronic paranoid schizophrenia, state Supreme Court Justice Kenneth R. Fisher ordered Harsit to be held for up to two more years in the Rochester Psychiatric Center. Criminal prosecution could resume if Harsit eventually responds to treatment and is found competent. If convicted, Harsit could be imprisoned up to 25 years. Subsequent History: Necati N. Harsit was allowed in June 2006 to plead not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect for attempting to arrange the death four years ago of Judge Roy Wheatley King, who had ruled against him in a property dispute. The plea acknowledges that Harsit, 44, was suffering from a mental defect that caused him to lack understanding that his actions were wrong, said Assistant District Attorney Timothy L. Prosperi. Prosecutors authorized the plea after psychiatrists agreed that Harsit suffered from chronic paranoid schizophrenia at the time of the incident. The plea ends a criminal case against Harsit that could have sent him to prison up to 25 years. After accepting the plea, County Court Judge Patricia D. Marks ordered Harsit to be turned over to state mental health authorities, who will send him to a secure facility. He can be released, if the authorities verify that he isn't a danger. Source: Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, September 3, 2003, September 14, 2004, and June 28, 2006

 

Date: 9/2003

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Kareem Rodriguez, 25, a man who suffers from schizophrenia, stabbed his nephew's 10-year-old friend in the back outside a Queens, NY apartment on September 21, 2003. Rodriguez was arrested shortly after the attack and charged with assault. The boy was taken to the hospital and stabilized. Rodriquez, who apparently became angered when he found the two boys jumping on his bed, had been released three months earlier from Jamaica Hospital Medical Center's psychiatric ward after four months of treatment. Rodriguez's nephew said when his uncle wasn't taking his medicine, he spoke to himself and liked to stab things with a small knife he always carried. Rodriguez's mother said her son had been acting erratically the day of the attack and had begun spitting his medication out. She had planned to call an ambulance to take him to the hospital later that evening. She said she tried to protest his earlier release from the hospital, but because her son was an adult, there was nothing she could do. Source: Newsday (New York), September 23, 2003 Daily News, September 23, 2003

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Alberto Menegro, 42, was charged with second-degree murder and first-degree assault in a fatal attack on his 8-year-old niece and other relatives in their Manhattan apartment. Police said that Menegro claimed to be "hearing voices in his head" when he killed the girl by slitting her throat and attacked other relatives on October 19, 2003. Menegro was alone in the kitchen with his sister's only child when he suddenly snapped and stabbed the 8-year-old with a steak knife, police said. Other relatives at home heard blood-curdling screams coming from the room, and the mom and uncle rushed in to see what was going on, cops said. Horrified at the sight of the dying girl crumpled on the floor, they tried to stop Menegro, who stabbed and wounded both of them, police said. Menegro's relatives told police he had been treated for schizophrenia at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital as recently as March 2003, but that he stopped taking his medicine. Menegro, who also cut his own throat during the incident, was moved to Bellevue Hospital after being treated at Harlem Hospital. Source: New York Post, October 21, 2003 The Daily News, October 20, 2003 New York Post, October 23, 2003

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Russell Harding, 39, the former head of the Housing Development Corporation appointed by Mayor Rudy Guiliani in 1998, was indicted in New York City on embezzlement charges in March 2003. Harding, who suffers from bipolar disorder, was accused of financing lavish vacations and other luxuries by disguising them as work expenses. A six-count federal indictment also accuses him of having a child-pornography movie and 10 child-pornography images on his computer. He plead innocent. Lawyers told the judge in his case that Harding's bipolar disorder skewed his ability to understand that his behavior was inappropriate. The charges against Harding carry a maximum of 45 years in prison, although if convicted he would likely get far less under federal sentencing guidelines. On November 3, 2003, Harding was arrested at his home because a doctor believed he might try to kill himself. After a brief hearing, U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan postponed Harding's trial and ordered he undergo psychiatric evaluation by doctors at the Federal Medical Center in Butner, N.C. Subsequent History: In an order dated October 28, 2004, District Judge Lewis Kaplan concluded that after thorough psychiatric evaluation, Harding is "competent to stand trial." Kaplan also noted that Harding "has informed the court that he does not dispute that finding." In September 2004, Kaplan announced that, based on a report he received from doctors, he was prepared to rule that Harding should be tried on charges that he stole more than $250,000 from a city housing department and destroyed evidence to cover up the thefts. Kaplan gave defense lawyers until September 27, 2004 to submit arguments challenging the findings. Source: New York Daily News, November 4, 2003 Newsday, November 5, 2003 Village Voice, September 21, 2004 Newsday, October 29, 2004

 

Date: 11/2003

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On November 11, 2003, Dennis Cherbavaz, a 50-year-old man with mental illness, led sheriff's deputies on a high-speed chase through his hometown of Rocky Point, NY, then violently resisted arrest and suffered a heart attack. The deputies were attempting to serve an order of protection filed by his sister after she alleged that Cherbavaz had tried to run her off the road in a car and break a chair over her head. Cherbavaz became incensed and fled, until deputies were able to catch up to him and pull him forceably out of the car. During the struggle to subdue him, Cherbavaz suffered the heart attack and was taken to the hospital. Cherbavaz was charged with felony reckless endangerment, as well as resisting arrest and menacing, both misdemeanors. Cherbavaz had been diagnosed as schizophrenic with bipolar disorder and had been admitted to psychiatric hospitals in New York and Massachusetts 23 times in two decades, said his mother, Diva Cherbavaz. She said she realized her son was a danger to himself two weeks before his arrest, had been on the phone with the Suffolk County Department of Health's crisis unit nearly every day, and even filed a police report against him for taking her 1993 Oldsmobile - just so he could be taken safely into custody. According her, Cherbavaz had recently lost his job and was upset over a custody battle between her and her daughter over the daughter's two young sons. "At least he is safe now," she said. "As long as he is in the hospital, he can't hurt himself anymore. That's the good part." Subsequent History: Cherbavaz died in the hospital three weeks after the incident. Source: Newsday (New York), November 13, 2003 Newsday (New York) April 11, 2004

 

Date: 7/2000

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Jaime Oliveira, 22, a man with schizophrenia, allegedly attacked two women in July and August 2000 after picking them up in his cab early in the morning outside two different bars in Woodside, Queens. In July 2000, he allegedly refused to allow a 31-year-old woman to leave his cab by locking her door from the front seat. He then walked around to the back, opened the passenger door and attacked her. In August 2000, he allegedly raped a 25-year-old woman as she slept in the back of his black Lincoln Town Car. He was charged with rape, sodomy, attempted rape, unlawful imprisonment, sex abuse and kidnapping and faces up to 50 years in prison if convicted. Oliveira, who had spent much of the two years since his arrest in and out of mental institutions and was on medication, has been missing since shortly after posting $150,000 bail on Oct. 21, 2003. He failed to appear for his November 5, 2003 trial date. "I'm not speculating" about whether he went off his medication once he made bail, his attorney Lawrence Kerben said. "He was looking at a lot of time. Fifteen years was the last offer from the DA's office." Source: New York Daily News, November 18, 2003

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: West Nyack, Rockland, NY

Summary: A man accused of beating and attempting to abduct a woman from the Palisades Center mall in West Nyack, NY, on March 21, 2003 was found not guilty after a trial in Rockland County Court, during which the defense portrayed him as a schizophrenic. While the jury determined that the prosecution proved that Brian Gordon, 21, had attempted to kidnap the woman, it determined he was not responsible for it because of a mental disease or defect. The jury also found Gordon not guilty of second-degree kidnapping, and two counts of second-degree assault. Dr. Alan Tuckman, a Pomona psychiatrist, testified for the prosecution that Gordon's mental condition wasn't an issue, while Dr. Marc Tarle, a psychiatrist from New City, testified that Gordon was a chronic schizophrenic. Gordon, who has been jailed since his arrest shortly after the incident, was ordered into the custody of the state Department of Mental Health, District Attorney Michael Bongiorno said. He will be held in a secure psychiatric hospital and evaluated periodically to determine if he still poses a threat to the community or himself. Gordon had faced up to 25 years imprisonment if he had been found guilty of kidnapping, the most serious charge against him. Source: Gannett Suburban New York Newspapers, November 27, 2003

 

Date: 12/2003

Location: Wyandanch, Suffolk, NY

Summary: Leon Kornegay, 23, a community college student from Wyandanch, NY, stabbed his marketing professor at Suffolk County Community College in Brentwood, NY, while classmates looked on in horror on Dec. 1, 2003, after months of his mother, Nadine Ward, trying to get psychiatric help for him. The professor, Salvotore Curiale, 45, was treated for wounds to the left side of his body. Kornegay pleaded not guilty to second-degree felony assault. Subsequent History: On June 30, 2004, Kornegay pleaded guilty to second-degree assault. On August 19, 2004, Suffolk County Judge Louis Ohlig sentenced Kornegay to 3 years in prison. Both Kornegay's attorney, Ira Rosenberg, and Ward said they were disappointed that Kornegay, who has paranoid schizophrenia, will be in prison when he needs psychiatric help. Ohlig cited Kornegay's prior involvement with the law, including a 1999 conviction for misdemeanor assault, as reason for the prison term. Ohlig also sentenced Kornegay to three years of post-release supervision following his prison sentence. Kornegay's paranoid schizophrenia was diagnosed after the November 2003 incident, Rosenberg said, and he is currently on medication for that condition. Prior History: Kornegay started acting paranoid in the summer before the murder. His mother persuaded him to check into the psychiatric ward at Southside Hospital in Bay Shore on Nov. 21, 2003, where the ER doctor said he exhibited signs of paranoid schizophrenia. The following day, when she told her son's assigned physician that she feared he would hurt someone if the hospital let him out, the doctor concurred, agreeing to seek a court order to have him committed involuntarily, Ward said. But the doctor changed his mind, Ward said, and the court order was not obtained. When he was discharged five days later on Nov. 26, it is unclear what his diagnosis was, but his discharge plan, Ward said, instructed him to take Rispodel, an anti-psychotic drug, twice a day, and to visit an outpatient clinic in Central Islip on Dec. 2. But Kornegay almost immediately tore up the discharge plan, and threw away the medication, Ward said. Source: Newsday, December 16, 2003; Newsday, July 1, 2004; Newsday, August 20, 2004

 

Date: 8/2002

Location: Amherst, Erie, NY

Summary: Joseph Tulumello, 60, a former surgeon, pleaded guilty to grand larceny and agreed to return to his 92-year-old mother the ownership of the Amherst home he made her sign over to him in August 2002. He was spared a jail term on the condition that he continue taking prescribed anti-psychotic medication and get further mental health counseling. In addition to taking over his mother's home, Tulumello allegedly also ran a phone sex and pornographic film business out of the home while she still lived there, spent her $50,000 annuity and cashed her Social Security and pension checks. In February 2003, Tulumello's medical license was revoked by the state after he was diagnosed as suffering from bipolar disorder. In July 2003, Erie County Judge Michael F. Pietruszka ordered a forensic mental examination of Tulumello, who was ultimately sent to Erie County Medical Center for care. Source: Buffalo News, December 11, 2003 Buffalo News, May 18, 2003 Buffalo News, February 28, 2004

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: Granby, Oswego, NY

Summary: Joseph Blake, an Oswego County, NY, man, was accused of killing his parents James, 81, and Betty Blake, 72, by striking them with a claw hammer. Their bodies were found July 16, 2003 in their home in Granby, NY. Blake, 48, was charged with two counts of first-degree murder. According to the arrest report, Blake has a history of mental health problems and a long involvement with Community Mental Health. A judge ordered an evaluation of Blake by two county psychiatrists due to Blake's disheveled appearance in court and his past history of psychiatric problems. The day before his parents were killed, Blake was taken by police to the Oswego Hospital emergency room for a mental health evaluation after he got into an altercation with a social worker. On the morning that his parents' bodies were found, Oswego officers again picked up Blake on a mental health order, which they have said was unrelated to the killings. Subsequent History: Blake pleaded guilty on November 18, 2004 to killing his parents and was sentenced to two concurrent terms of 25 years to life. On October 18, 2004, Blake was found competent enough to assist in his defense and stand trial, acting County Judge John Elliott said. During a brief hearing in April 2004, defense lawyer Joseph Rodak said a clinical psychologist recommended Blake undergo a brain scan because he had suffered a series of head injuries throughout his lifetime and these may have caused brain damage. After appearing in Oswego County Surrogate Court on July 13, 2004, it was decided that Blake would undergo further psychiatric evaluations.The District Attorney's Office was given the opportunity to select their own doctor to evaluate Blake. Prior History: Since 1995, Blake had been treated in several psychiatric facilities for bi-polar disorder. Blake also had a history of going off medications, Rodak said. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), January 27, 2004/ April 27, 2004/ July 20, 2004/ October 19, 2004/ November 19, 2004; The Palladium Times, July 19, 2004/ October 19, 2004; Long Island Newsday, December 21, 2004

 

Date: 3/2001

Location: , , NY

Summary: Juan Arequipa, 49, spiked a bottle of Coca-Cola with cyanide and tried to get his unsuspecting teenage children to join him in a fatal toast. Fortunately, both children survived. After Arequipa's son saw his father and sister were getting sick and collapsing, he called 911. The father and daughter were unconscious when ambulance workers arrived, and Arequipa later died. His daughter was in critical but stable condition the next day. Police sources stated that Arequipa was distraught and depressed. Family members stated that he had spoken of suicide and was being treated with medication for depression. Source: Newsday, March 24, 2001

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Lynbrook, Nassau, NY

Summary: Peter John Troy, 35, a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder and given two life sentences without parole for killing a Lynbrook, NY, priest and parishioner with a semi-automatic rifle at morning Mass, then barricading himself in his home in a seven-hour standoff with police on March 12, 2002. He was also sentenced to a minimum of 25 years in prison for the attempted first-degree murder of a police officer during his arrest, and the judge levied a $20,310.10 reimbursement for the two victims' funeral costs. Psychologist Anthony Santoro, who said he spoke with Troy on three dates, concluded that Troy was mentally capable of helping his attorney before and during trial. The conclusion contradicted his physicians' finding. Against his lawyer's advice, Troy insisted on representing himself at trial, and refused to use an insanity defense. Prior History: According to his mother, Troy began showing signs of mental illness while in college. For the next 15 years, Troy was hospitalized several times and placed on medication. Twice in 2001, Troy was detained by the police and admitted to psychiatric hospital wards. But a judge ordered him released, and a county mental health agency failed to locate him for follow-up care that doctors had urged. The state's Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled later found that Nassau County "inappropriately" closed his case. The year before the shootings, Bellevue Hospital Center had told the Nassau County mental health department that Troy was a candidate for outpatient treatment under Kendra's Law. Troy's lawyer had sought to have his client declared incompetent to stand trial, but the judge refused. Saying that Troy had shown no remorse, the judge called him "extremely dangerous, arrogant, stubborn, a mean individual hellbent on causing as much pain as you could." Sunsequent History: In March 2004, the family of one of his victims, Eileen Tosner, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Nassau County's Department of Mental Health and the Nassau University Medical Center. Troy was also named in the suit. Despite a bid by Nassau County to throw out the civil lawsuit, in July 2004 Supreme Court Justice William LaMarca ruled that the wrongful death case could move ahead. Troy represented himself in the suit. In 2005, Troy, who still claimed his innocence, tried to block the suit by refusing to release any of his mental health records, despite two orders by a state Supreme Court Justice. Source: Newsday (New York, NY), March 14, 2002; Daily News, March 16, 2002; The New York Times, March 20, 2002; July 31, 2003; Newsday, 2/28/03; 3/11/03; 6/20/03; 6/26/03; 5/17/04; 7/15/04; 5/25/05

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: Lynbrook, Nassau, NY

Summary: Peter John Troy, 35, a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic, was convicted of two counts of first-degree murder and given two life sentences without parole for killing a Lynbrook, NY, priest and parishioner with a semi-automatic rifle at morning Mass, then barricading himself in his home in a seven-hour standoff with police on March 12, 2002. He was also sentenced to a minimum of 25 years in prison for the attempted first-degree murder of a police officer during his arrest, and the judge levied a $20,310.10 reimbursement for the two victims' funeral costs. Psychologist Anthony Santoro, who said he spoke with Troy on three dates, concluded that Troy was mentally capable of helping his attorney before and during trial. The conclusion contradicted his physicians' finding. Against his lawyer's advice, Troy insisted on representing himself at trial, and refused to use an insanity defense. Prior History: According to his mother, Troy began showing signs of mental illness while in college. For the next 15 years, Troy was hospitalized several times and placed on medication. Twice in 2001, Troy was detained by the police and admitted to psychiatric hospital wards. But a judge ordered him released, and a county mental health agency failed to locate him for follow-up care that doctors had urged. The state's Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled later found that Nassau County "inappropriately" closed his case. The year before the shootings, Bellevue Hospital Center had told the Nassau County mental health department that Troy was a candidate for outpatient treatment under Kendra's Law. Troy's lawyer had sought to have his client declared incompetent to stand trial, but the judge refused. Saying that Troy had shown no remorse, the judge called him "extremely dangerous, arrogant, stubborn, a mean individual hellbent on causing as much pain as you could." Sunsequent History: In March 2004, the family of one of his victims, Eileen Tosner, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Nassau County's Department of Mental Health and the Nassau University Medical Center. Troy was also named in the suit. Despite a bid by Nassau County to throw out the civil lawsuit, in July 2004 Supreme Court Justice William LaMarca ruled that the wrongful death case could move ahead. Troy represented himself in the suit. In 2005, Troy, who still claimed his innocence, tried to block the suit by refusing to release any of his mental health records, despite two orders by a state Supreme Court Justice. Source: Newsday (New York, NY), March 14, 2002; Daily News, March 16, 2002; The New York Times, March 20, 2002; July 31, 2003; Newsday, 2/28/03; 3/11/03; 6/20/03; 6/26/03; 5/17/04; 7/15/04; 5/25/05

 

Date: 3/2002

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Rev. Julio Torres, 57, and his wife were brutally attacked in their rectory home on March 31, 2002 by Torres' oldest son, Javier, 27, who was visiting the couple from a halfway house in Baltimore for the weekend. Javier Torres stabbed his 37-year-old stepmother in the abdomen and back and his father in five places in the chest and back before fleeing. He was arrested later that night after surrendering to police near Times Square. Torres was charged with two counts of attempted murder and is being held on Rikers Island. Rev. Torres emphasized that his son, who has suffered from paranoid schizophrenia since he was 19, attacked them in the midst of a delusional breakdown. Rev. Torres said his son regularly refused to take his anti-psychotic medicine. As recently as December, 2001, a Maryland judge found that Torres did not need to be confined to a mental hospital despite indications that he was homicidal. Source: Daily News (New York), May 6, 2002

 

Date: 4/2002

Location: Hoosick Falls, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: At 2 a.m. on April 16, 2002, Christine Wilhelm of Hoosick Falls, NY drowned her 4-year-old son, Luke, and attempted to drown her 5-year-old son, Peter, in a bathtub in the family home. Wilhelm, who has a history of schizophrenia, pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to three counts of second-degree murder and one count of attempted second-degree murder, but was eventually convicted of murder in July 2003. On September 3, she was given the maximum sentence of 50 years to life by Rensselaer County Court Judge Patrick McGrath, who told Wilhelm he had "no room for mercy" for her. Wilhelm had claimed her husband sexually abused the children and the drowning was an intended "act of mercy" for them. It was later determined that there was no evidence of abuse. Since her imprisonment at the Rensselaer County Jail, Wilhelm underwent several disciplinary hearings, was placed on suicide watch and given antipsychotic medication. During her incarceration, she will be at a much higher risk for suicide attempts and will be shunned by other inmates, according to experts. Her attorney says Wilhelm still talks about Luke as if he's alive and has tried to take her own life in jail. "It's a sad day for psychiatry because our society seems not to be able to see the forest for the trees when it comes down to people's mental behavior," said Dr. Stephen Price, who was the defense team's star witness. Since Wilhelm's conviction, two social worker's testimonies indicating Wilhelm knew the killing was wrong have come into question, and the public defender was contemplating a grand jury investigation. Prior History: Wilhelm had a history of involvement with child protective services and multiple psychiatric hospitalizations in both Florida and New York. Prior to the killing, her husband had brought her to Albany Medical Center, where she was hospitalized in the psychiatric wing for more than a week. Wilhelm also made contact with Capital Region social services numerous times - as recently as four days before the killing - telling them she was afraid her children were in danger. Her mother testified in court that she had begged her son-in-law to hospitalize Wilhelm just two days before the drowning, and that Wilhelm was not taking her medication at the time, a fact confirmed by Kenneth Wilhelm. Subsequent History: In June 2006, Christine Wilhelm’s last-ditch appeal was making its way through the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court. Wilhelm’s lawyer, public defender Jerry Frost, was back in court in Albany arguing that Wilhelm's sentence of 50 years to life in prison should be reversed and that she should be granted a new trial. Mr. Frost contended, yet again, that Wilhelm is not guilty by the reasons of her own insanity. He also reiterated that she belongs in the strict confinement of a mental institution, not in a prison cell. Subsequent History: On August 24, 2006, an appellate court reversed Christine Wilhelm's 2003 murder conviction and ordered a new trial for the woman who was found guilty of drowning one son and trying to drown his brother. The court ruled that Wilhelm's right to counsel was violated by the testimony of child protective case workers who interviewed her without a lawyer. Wilhelm, 42, is serving a sentence of 46 years to life in prison. She had stopped taking her medication to treat paranoid schizophrenia about a month before she held her 4-year-old son, Luke, under his bathwater on April 15, 2002, prosecutors said. Wilhelm's other son, Peter, now 9, survived after begging her to let him go. He testified at the trial that his mother was seeing werewolves on the night she attacked him and his brother. A five-judge panel of the Appellate Division of state Supreme Court ruled unanimously that Kathleen McGarry and Casi Maloney of county Child Protective Services were working with law enforcement when they interviewed Wilhelm without her lawyer present and reported her comments to the district attorney's office. They said Wilhelm told them she knew what she was doing was wrong but did it anyway. The 16-page decision, written by Justice Thomas E. Mercure, said defense attorney Jerry Frost was correct in arguing that the two case workers' trial testimony should not have been allowed. It stated that the CPS workers "had 'a cooperative working arrangement' with and were acting as agents of the police and prosecutor in interviewing and relaying her incriminating status." Subsequent History: Christine Wilhelm pleaded not guilty on September 13, 2006, citing mental illness, in a deal reached with prosecutors. Wilhelm will be sent to a psychiatric facility where she could spend the rest of her life. Rensselaer County District Attorney Patricia DeAngelis agreed to the deal three weeks after an appeals court tossed Wilhelm's conviction. Judge Patrick McGrath turned Wilhelm over to the state Commission on Mental Health to be placed in a secure mental facility at the Mid-Hudson Psychiatric Center in Orange County. Within 30 days, she will get an examination by two independent psychiatrists. That report will be returned to the judge who then will have 10 days to schedule a hearing to determine whether Wilhelm suffers from a dangerous mental disorder that would keep her in the facility. She will have another evaluation within six months, another within a year and every two years after that. Source: Albany Times Union (New York), June 6, 2002 Albany Times Union, 5/29/03, 6/3/03, 6/19/03, 7/8/03, 7/8/06, 8/14/06, 8/25/06, 8/27/06, 8/30/06, 9/13/06, 9/15/06, 9/17/06;Saratogian, 7/10/03; The Daily Gazette, 7/10/03

 

Date: 1/2000

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Chris Pollard, 21, of Brooklyn, was sentenced after being convicted of attempted rape, burglary and assault charges related to his attack on a 49-year-old nanny at the West 46th Street home of Thomas Winberry. On January 1, 2000, Pollard was sent to Winberry's home to deliver a package and attacked and choked the nanny after forcing his way into the house. Winberry returned home while Pollard was there, and Pollard attacked him as well, slashing him across the face, inflicting a gash that required 50 stiches to close. State Supreme Court Justice Bonnie Wittner said psychiatric tests show that Pollard has "a major psychotic disorder, possibly schizophrenia," and that "he is a threat to himself and others." The judge designated Pollard a "predicate violent felon", directed that he receive psychiatric treatment in prison and be supervised for five years after his release, and ordered him registered as a sex offender. Source: The Associated Press, October 20, 2000

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Larme Price, 30, was charged with first-degree murder and faces the death penalty for allegedly killing four immigrants in separate acts of revenge against Arabs for the September 11 terror attacks. However, questions mounted about whether proper psychiatric treatment could have cut short the rampage. The killing spree began February 8, 2003, when police say Price shot and killed a Guyanese immigrant of Indian descent in a Queens grocery store. Two hours later, Price allegedly fatally shot an immigrant from India in his Brooklyn convenience store. An immigrant from the Ukraine was killed March 10 at his laundermat in Brooklyn after Price said he "disrespected" him. Ten days later, Price allegedly killed a Yemeni immigrant in a Crown Heights, Brooklyn, grocery store. Brooklyn Criminal Court Judge Timothy Duffici placed Price on suicide watch after his arrest and ordered detoxification treatment for the admitted drug user. Price's relatives have said they repeatedly tried to get psychiatric treatment for the father of three who descended into paranoia and rage. They said Price was turned away from Woodhull Hospital several times. A hospital source told the Daily News that Price had been seen by a psychiatrist but was discharged because he showed no sign of being a danger to himself or others. Source: Daily News, April 1, 2003

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Larme Price, 30, was charged with first-degree murder and faces the death penalty for allegedly killing four immigrants in separate acts of revenge against Arabs for the September 11 terror attacks. However, questions mounted about whether proper psychiatric treatment could have cut short the rampage. The killing spree began February 8, 2003, when police say Price shot and killed a Guyanese immigrant of Indian descent in a Queens grocery store. Two hours later, Price allegedly fatally shot an immigrant from India in his Brooklyn convenience store. An immigrant from the Ukraine was killed March 10 at his laundermat in Brooklyn after Price said he "disrespected" him. Ten days later, Price allegedly killed a Yemeni immigrant in a Crown Heights, Brooklyn, grocery store. Brooklyn Criminal Court Judge Timothy Duffici placed Price on suicide watch after his arrest and ordered detoxification treatment for the admitted drug user. Price's relatives have said they repeatedly tried to get psychiatric treatment for the father of three who descended into paranoia and rage. They said Price was turned away from Woodhull Hospital several times. A hospital source told the Daily News that Price had been seen by a psychiatrist but was discharged because he showed no sign of being a danger to himself or others. Source: Daily News, April 1, 2003

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Larme Price, 30, was charged with first-degree murder and faces the death penalty for allegedly killing four immigrants in separate acts of revenge against Arabs for the September 11 terror attacks. However, questions mounted about whether proper psychiatric treatment could have cut short the rampage. The killing spree began February 8, 2003, when police say Price shot and killed a Guyanese immigrant of Indian descent in a Queens grocery store. Two hours later, Price allegedly fatally shot an immigrant from India in his Brooklyn convenience store. An immigrant from the Ukraine was killed March 10 at his laundermat in Brooklyn after Price said he "disrespected" him. Ten days later, Price allegedly killed a Yemeni immigrant in a Crown Heights, Brooklyn, grocery store. Brooklyn Criminal Court Judge Timothy Duffici placed Price on suicide watch after his arrest and ordered detoxification treatment for the admitted drug user. Price's relatives have said they repeatedly tried to get psychiatric treatment for the father of three who descended into paranoia and rage. They said Price was turned away from Woodhull Hospital several times. A hospital source told the Daily News that Price had been seen by a psychiatrist but was discharged because he showed no sign of being a danger to himself or others. Source: Daily News, April 1, 2003

 

Date: 9/2002

Location: Middle Island, Suffolk, NY

Summary: Christopher Maggio, 31, who suffers from depression and "probably other mental illnesses" according to his lawyer, held his parents hostage in their Head of the Harbor home because he was angry about the break-up of his marriage. Maggio has been charged with second-degree kidnapping for terrorizing his parents and threatening them with a knife, a handgun and a stun gun and for causing destruction to their property. Maggio's wife, a Russian woman he brought back from that country to marry, filed an order of protection against him after several months of marriage and finally left him after he violated the order. Source: Newsday (New York), October 1, 2002

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Seijo Imazaki, 26, a man with bipolar disorder, was sentenced to five years' probation for assaulting a New Rochelle, NY police officer after breaking into his ex-girlfriend's apartment on July 28, 2003. The woman had supported him for years but finally became overwhelmed by his unwillingness to stay on medication. The day of the incident, Imazaki broke into her apartment, ransacked a room and stole an air mattress. He said he was looking for mementos from his father. Police responded to the woman's frantic 911 call. An officer scuffled with Imazaki while trying to arrest him and suffered a knee injury. Imazaki can never contact his ex-girlfriend or her family, must move to Minnesota where he has relatives, and cannot leave that state without the permission of his psychiatrist or probation officer, State Supreme Court Justice Mary Smith said. Following a non-jury trial, Smith acquitted Imazaki of burglary, but convicted him of felony assault on a police officer and misdemeanor charges of criminal mischief, trespass and resisting arrest. Imazaki could have faced up to seven years in state prison. Assistant District Attorney Dan Schorr asked for prison time because Imazaki was a felon who could not be trusted to take his medication. Prior History: Imazaki's brother, Reiko, developed a severe mental illness after high school and killed their father in November 1995. Imazaki returned home that day to find his father's body tucked into bed. Reiko remains in a psychiatric hospital. Imazaki went on to become a model, but eventually developed bipolar disorder, and was hospitalized whenever he stopped taking his medication. He has said he was sexually abused as a teenager by his high school wrestling coach. Source: The Journal News, May 26, 2004

 

Date: 7/2003

Location: New Rochelle, Westchester, NY

Summary: Seijo Imazaki, 26, a man with bipolar disorder, was sentenced to five years' probation for assaulting a New Rochelle, NY police officer after breaking into his ex-girlfriend's apartment on July 28, 2003. The woman had supported him for years but finally became overwhelmed by his unwillingness to stay on medication. The day of the incident, Imazaki broke into her apartment, ransacked a room and stole an air mattress. He said he was looking for mementos from his father. Police responded to the woman's frantic 911 call. An officer scuffled with Imazaki while trying to arrest him and suffered a knee injury. Imazaki can never contact his ex-girlfriend or her family, must move to Minnesota where he has relatives, and cannot leave that state without the permission of his psychiatrist or probation officer, State Supreme Court Justice Mary Smith said. Following a non-jury trial, Smith acquitted Imazaki of burglary, but convicted him of felony assault on a police officer and misdemeanor charges of criminal mischief, trespass and resisting arrest. Imazaki could have faced up to seven years in state prison. Assistant District Attorney Dan Schorr asked for prison time because Imazaki was a felon who could not be trusted to take his medication. Prior History: Imazaki's brother, Reiko, developed a severe mental illness after high school and killed their father in November 1995. Imazaki returned home that day to find his father's body tucked into bed. Reiko remains in a psychiatric hospital. Imazaki went on to become a model, but eventually developed bipolar disorder, and was hospitalized whenever he stopped taking his medication. He has said he was sexually abused as a teenager by his high school wrestling coach. Source: The Journal News, May 26, 2004

 

Date: 2/2003

Location: Monticello, Sullivan, NY

Summary: Jessica Melchick, a woman with a lengthy history of serious mental illness and hospitalizations, admitted to killing her 79-year-old mother, Amelia Vogel, on February 16, 2003 in the older woman's Monticello, NY home. A psychiatrist who testified at her plea hearing in June 2004 said that Melchick, 46, thought she was saving her mother from an evil beast that possessed her when she stabbed her 120 times with a pair of scissors. Melchick has a mood disorder and schizophrenic symptoms, said Dr. John Lucas. "It wasn't her that I killed that night," Melchick told the judge. The judge took that admission as an insanity plea. District Attorney Steve Lungen asked the judge to rule that Melchick is a dangerous person so she can be committed to a secure mental hospital for treatment. Prior History: On November 26, 2001, Melchick impaled herself with a samurai sword. Source: Middletown Times-Herald, June 11, 2004

 

Date: 12/2002

Location: Mount Vernon, Westchester, NY

Summary: Dyego Foddrell, a man with mental illness, was charged with murder in the beating death of his girlfriend's 2-year-old son, Maurice Campbell Jr., on December 6, 2002 in Mount Vernon, NY. His lawyer, William Martin, said Foddrell, 25, had been previously diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia while in state prison, but when he was released in early 2002 he was left to fend for himself without any medication, and should therefore not be held criminally responsible. Assistant District Attorney Fredric Green said that a videotaped statement Foddrell gave detectives made it clear that he had brutalized the boy for soiling his pants and bed, and that he was aware of what he had done. Green said Foddrell had been beating Cambell for weeks as part of his method of toilet training. Subsequent History: On August 24, 2004, State Supreme Court Justice Mary Smith sentenced Foddrell to 25 years to life in state prison. A jury had convicted Foddrell of second-degree murder in June. The child's mother, Sharell Johnson, was also charged with murder because she had ignored the risk Foddrell posed and left the child alone with the ex-convict. In 2003, a jury convicted her of the lesser charge of criminally negligent homicide and she was sentenced to 1 1/2 to 4 years in prison. Source: The Journal News.com (NY), June 17, 2004 White Plains Journal News, August 25, 2004

 

Date: 6/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On June 17, 2004, two teenage boys beat a homeless man to death outside a Brooklyn church. Police responding to a frantic 911 call from the priest, found 43 bricks strewn around Billy Pearson's corpse, which was tucked under a rosebush in front of St. Gabriel's Church in East New York, where Pearson desperately tried to seek sanctuary. The two 15-year-old neighborhood boys, Dashorn Washington and Jamel Robinson, were charged as adults with murder and criminal possession of a weapon. Police said the boys spotted Pearson, 51, sleeping in an abandoned car at 3:00 AM. They chased him to the front of the church and beat him to death. Dashorn Washington's mother said her son has bipolar and attention-deficit disorders, and that she had placed him in group homes to try to address his illness. "I've been working with my son for years to prevent something like this", said Geraldine Washington. Subsequent History: Jameel Robinson was convicted of second-degree murder on April 12, 2005. Source: New York Daily News, June 18, 2004; Newsday (New York) June 19, 2004; New York Daily News, June 19, 2004; New York Daily News, April 13, 2005

 

Date: 6/2004

Location: Niagara Falls, Niagara, NY

Summary: Joseph K. O'Connor, 39, pleaded not guilty to felony charges of second-degree murder and first-degree arson in the strangling death of his wife and the burning of their home in Niagara Falls, NY on June 18, 2004. O'Connor was arrested in front of the burning house just before 11 a.m., when police arrived to investigate the report of a domestic fight. Police said O'Connor told them he strangled his wife and set three fires in the home using papers and the gas stove. Michelle O'Connor, 33, was found in the first-floor dining room with a rope around her neck. Two officers dragged her out the back door, but efforts to revive her were unsuccessful. She was pronounced dead in Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center. The couple's three children were in school at the time. O'Connor was allegedly upset about an argument he had with his wife. During his arraignment, O'Connor told Judge Mark A. Violante he had not taken his prescribed medication, lithium bicarbonate, for four days before the incident. He said he was not under the care of a doctor. Subsequent History: In April 2005, O'Connor pleaded guilty to first-degree manslaughter in exchange for a fixed 20-year prison term. Assistant Public Defender Christopher A. Privateer, who was planning to try an insanity defense at a trial, said it was the best deal he could make. A Family Court judge also ruled that O'Connor was to have no contact with his three children for the duration of his sentence. Prior History: O'Connor was arrested and charged with sexual abuse and endangering the welfare of a child in an incident involving one of his daughters in November 2001, and on a domestic violence assault charge in June 2001. Child Protective Services wanted him to leave the home for the safety of the children, according to court records. Source: Buffalo News (New York), June 19, 2004; Buffalo News, 4/22/05

 

Date: 6/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Police took Henry “Hank” Daragona, an 81-year-old man with mental illness, into custody after threatening to shoot and kill his neighbor with a high-powered rifle in Syracuse, NY on June 30, 2004. Daragona held the Syracuse Police Department Emergency Response Team at bay for almost nine hours before they stormed his home. No one was injured. "He's been diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic," said Sgt. Tom Connellan. "He'd been off his medication for a few days." Daragona's nephew said he had tried earlier to get his uncle to go to the VA Medical Center for treatment once he realized the elderly man was acting strangely. However, Daragona refused to go. "He was not rational," the sergeant said. Daragona was taken to the Onondaga County Justice Center and arraigned on a single misdemeanor count of fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon. The judge ordered Daragona to undergo an informal mental examination, and also issued an order of protection for the neighbor, Harry LaPoint. Bail was set at $5,000 cash or bond. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), July 2, 2004

 

Date: 4/2003

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Jay Clegg, 23, was charged with felony assault in an attack on Erie County sheriff's deputies on April 23, 2003 in Erie County Medical Center's guarded psychiatric ward in Buffalo, NY. In April 2004, Erie County Judge Shirley Troutman found him not guilty by reason of mental defect, necessitating a hearing on whether he would be placed in a regular mental hospital or one that is guarded. On June 30, 2004, Troutman ordered Clegg, who has a long history of anti-social psychiatric disorders, to spend at least the next year in the guarded section of Rochester Psychiatric Center while he undergoes treatment. During the hearing, Rochester Psychiatric Center psychiatrists Srinivas C. Yerneni and Christopher Deakin testified that Clegg has chronic paranoid schizophrenia and a personality disorder. Source: Buffalo News (New York), July 1, 2004

 

Date: 6/2003

Location: Rochester, Monroe, NY

Summary: On June 15, 2003, Ervin C. Evans, a man with paranoid schizophrenia, propped a .22-caliber rifle atop a fence next to his Rochester, NY home and put a bullet through Edwin H. Rivera's head as the man stood five houses away. Evans, who was charged with second-degree murder, pleaded guilty in Monroe County Court to a lesser charge of first-degree manslaughter, admitting that he killed Rivera, 19, while acting under extreme emotional disturbance. Judge Richard A. Keenan agreed to consider a prison term ranging from a minimum of five years to a maximum of 15 years. Although Evans, 36, faced a prison sentence of up to 25 years to life if convicted of murder, prosecutors consented to the plea and lesser sentence. In the months before Rivera was shot and killed, he and members of his group harassed Evans - beating him, throwing snowballs at him, slashing the tires of his car and breaking the windows of his home. Although Evans said he feared for his life when he retrieved the rifle from his basement, defense lawyer Thomas J. Cocuzzi said Evans' illness made it difficult to determine whether he was delusional about shots being fired at him first. Source: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, July 16, 2004

 

Date: 7/2004

Location: Niagara Falls, Niagara, NY

Summary: In Niagara Falls, NY, a mother accused of fatally stabbing her 9-year-old daughter on July 17, 2004 reportedly told police she killed the child because "voices" told her to do so. Falisha M. Madera, 25, also told police she had forgotten to take her medication for schizophrenia that day. Madera was charged with second-degree murder. Kayla Madera had been stabbed repeatedly in the chest with a kitchen knife and was found on a bedroom floor of their apartment. Madera's mother also lived in the apartment, but was visiting family in Rochester when the girl was killed. Madera reportedly phoned her mother to tell her of the slaying, and the mother called Niagara Falls police. She was taken to Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center after her arrest for a psychiatric evaluation. Subsequent History: Madera pleaded not guilty during her arraignment on July 26, 2004, and was sent to Niagara County Jail in lieu of $250,000 bail. Madera was then committed to Rochester Psychiatric Center in August 2004 after a ruling that she was not competent to be tried. However, state doctors in December 2004 said she was competent. She was returned to Niagara County Jail. Source: The Buffalo News, July 19 & 24, 2004; WIVB, July 21, 2004; Daily News (New York) April 13, 2005

 

Date: 7/2004

Location: Canastota, Madison, NY

Summary: A Syracuse man, Patrick S. Lanno, 45, was arrested on July 14, 2004 in Canastota, NY for abducting and hitting his wife, holding her against her will during a car trip that spanned three counties, and violating an order of protection. Lanno has a bipolar disorder that was not properly medicated, said his attorney, David Primo. It was a missed medication that sent him into the "tailspin" that led to his arrest, Primo said. After his arrest, Lanno was freed on $25,000 cash bail on a felony charge of criminal contempt and a misdemeanor charge of menacing. Subsequent History: A few days after Lanno's arrest, he was sent to Central New York Psychiatric Center for an evaluation with psychiatrist Jean Liu. Liu testified that she diagnosed Lanno with bipolar disorder type 1. The district attorney's office sought to have Lanno indicted on felony kidnapping and robbery charges Prior History: Lanno had been hospitalized at St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center several weeks before the incident, and was diagnosed "deep depression" and prescribed Zoloft. Lanno's prior criminal record includes a felony conviction for possessing stolen property and a charge of unlicensed practice of law. Primo said the unlicensed practice of law charge comes out of helping four friends get out of traffic tickets in Onondaga County. Lanno had learned the process while having a lawyer take care of one of his tickets and had business cards printed up advertising his ability. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse, NY), August 10, 2004; Syracuse Post Standard, June 30, 2005

 

Date: 8/2004

Location: Huntington Station, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On August 14, 2004, Jerell Harris, a homeless man with a known history of mental illness, shot and wounded a police officer after an altercation in Huntington Station, NY. That day, family members had called police after a domestic dispute, fearing Harris might hurt himself. When police arrived, Harris wrestled three officers before grabbing the gun of Officer Michael Coscia, 26, and shooting him in the abdomen, police said. Coscia survived. Lanise Felder, Harris' girlfriend, said police often taunted Harris on the car loudspeaker, saying things like, "How you doing today Jerell? What's going on? Did you take a shower? You stink." She said she saw Coscia's picture in news reports about the incident and recognized him as one of the officers she'd seen taunting Harris in the past. Harris, who also struck a deputy in the face as he was being taken out of his holding cell for his arraignment, pleaded not guilty to attempted murder, second-degree assault, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct. Judge Paul Hensley ordered Harris held at the Suffolk County jail in Riverhead without bail. Subsequent History: Harris pleaded guilty in Septmeber 2005 to two counts of first-degree attempted murder and nine other charges. On October 18, 2005, he was sentenced to 17 years in prison. Harris also pleaded guilty to criminal possession of a weapon, robbery, four assault charges, resisting arrest, obstructing governmental administration and disorderly conduct. Prior History: Police said Harris has 26 prior arrests in Suffolk County for crimes including drug sale and possession, criminal possession of a weapon, assault, menacing and robbery. Harris had been diagnosed at Stony Brook University Hospital with a chemical imbalance during one of his stints in jail. When he returned to jail after his initial diagnosis, Felder said he would call and say he was being given Thorazine, an anti-psychotic drug, which she believes, worsened his mental state. After his release from jail, Harris was know to pace the streets talking and laughing to himself and to argue with trees. He would sometimes walk, 10-mile stretches at a time, from his Huntington Station neighborhood in Suffolk's Second Precinct to Wyandanch. Once when the family tried to take him to Pilgrim Psychiatric Center in Brentwood, Felder said Harris jumped out of the car. "He would say, 'I don't want any help from the state because the state is what did this to me,'" she said. Source: Newsday (NY), August 16, 2004; New York Daily News, October 19, 2005

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: Albany, Albany, NY

Summary: Bart Browne, a 33-year-old man with schizophrenia, was accused of punching a man outside an Albany, NY bar on October 10, 2003 because he was upset to see him kissing another male. The single punch broke the 28-year-old victim's jaw and caused a permanent loss of feeling in his left cheek. Mary and Stephen Browne acknowledge their son suffered from a variety of mental problems, including schizophrenia, and don't deny he struck the man. But they insist Browne didn't attack the man because he was gay. "When the schizophrenia would rise up, it was all about anger, frustration and rage," she said. "But he would have great periods of calm in between." In an oral statement to Albany Detective Michael Nadoraski, Browne allegedly said he'd had a bad day when he hit the victim. He also said homosexuals "think life is a big joke. "Witnesses said they saw Browne hit the man, then scream for the "faggots" to stop following him as witnesses gave chase, said Albany County District Attorney Paul Clyne. Mary Browne said her son was agitated because he totaled his vehicle in a head-on crash that morning, a week after two of his best friends were killed in a collision. Subsequent History: On May 15, 2004, Browne hung himself at his family's farm outside Albany, NY. Two weeks earlier, he had pleaded guilty to second-degree assault under the state's hate crimes law to avoid a trial and a possible 15 years behind bars, his mother, Mary Browne said. The plea deal with the Albany County district attorney's office would have sent the father of two to state prison for up to four years. Browne was scheduled to be sentenced on June 24, 2004. Source: Albany Times Union, August 30, 2004

 

Date: 8/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On August 4, 2004, Richard Figueroa, 26, a man with schizophrenia, was shot and wounded by police after he charged at them with a 10-inch butcher knife in his home in Brooklyn, NY. The incident occurred after Figueroa's mother called a private ambulance company to intervene with her son, who was threatening to kill her and other family members. When the ambulance arrived, Figueroa started charging at the window of the vehicle with the butcher knife. Police were called, and witnesses said that Figueroa ignored several commands to freeze and drop his weapon, and kept advancing toward the officers. An officer then fired several times and hit Figueroa in the abdomen. His brother, Joe Figueroa, 44, who was across the street, was hit in the leg by a bullet that ricocheted, a police source said. Both were taken to Bellevue Hospital Center, where Richard Figueroa was admitted in critical condition. Figueroa's relatives said his illness worsened three or four years earlier after he returned from a six-month stint as an army reservist. His mother, Anna, said Figueroa had not skipped his medication but "was out of control" and hadn't slept for four days before the incident. He was first diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1997. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said that the use of deadly force Figueroa appeared justified. Subsequent History: Figueroa was charged with reckless endangerment, assault with intent to cause physical injury with a weapon, menacing and criminal possession of a weapon. Source: Newsday (New York), September 5 & 6, 2004 New York Daily News, September 6 & 7, 2004

 

Date: 8/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On August 4, 2004, Richard Figueroa, 26, a man with schizophrenia, was shot and wounded by police after he charged at them with a 10-inch butcher knife in his home in Brooklyn, NY. The incident occurred after Figueroa's mother called a private ambulance company to intervene with her son, who was threatening to kill her and other family members. When the ambulance arrived, Figueroa started charging at the window of the vehicle with the butcher knife. Police were called, and witnesses said that Figueroa ignored several commands to freeze and drop his weapon, and kept advancing toward the officers. An officer then fired several times and hit Figueroa in the abdomen. His brother, Joe Figueroa, 44, who was across the street, was hit in the leg by a bullet that ricocheted, a police source said. Both were taken to Bellevue Hospital Center, where Richard Figueroa was admitted in critical condition. Figueroa's relatives said his illness worsened three or four years earlier after he returned from a six-month stint as an army reservist. His mother, Anna, said Figueroa had not skipped his medication but "was out of control" and hadn't slept for four days before the incident. He was first diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1997. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said that the use of deadly force Figueroa appeared justified. Subsequent History: Figueroa was charged with reckless endangerment, assault with intent to cause physical injury with a weapon, menacing and criminal possession of a weapon. Source: Newsday (New York), September 5 & 6, 2004 New York Daily News, September 6 & 7, 2004

 

Date: 8/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On August 4, 2004, Richard Figueroa, 26, a man with schizophrenia, was shot and wounded by police after he charged at them with a 10-inch butcher knife in his home in Brooklyn, NY. The incident occurred after Figueroa's mother called a private ambulance company to intervene with her son, who was threatening to kill her and other family members. When the ambulance arrived, Figueroa started charging at the window of the vehicle with the butcher knife. Police were called, and witnesses said that Figueroa ignored several commands to freeze and drop his weapon, and kept advancing toward the officers. An officer then fired several times and hit Figueroa in the abdomen. His brother, Joe Figueroa, 44, who was across the street, was hit in the leg by a bullet that ricocheted, a police source said. Both were taken to Bellevue Hospital Center, where Richard Figueroa was admitted in critical condition. Figueroa's relatives said his illness worsened three or four years earlier after he returned from a six-month stint as an army reservist. His mother, Anna, said Figueroa had not skipped his medication but "was out of control" and hadn't slept for four days before the incident. He was first diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1997. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said that the use of deadly force Figueroa appeared justified. Subsequent History: Figueroa was charged with reckless endangerment, assault with intent to cause physical injury with a weapon, menacing and criminal possession of a weapon. Source: Newsday (New York), September 5 & 6, 2004 New York Daily News, September 6 & 7, 2004

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Martin Fairhurst, a 28-year-old man with mental illness, lured four boys from a video store to his parents' home in Brooklyn, NY and sexually assaulted them between March and April 2003. Fairhurst befriended the three 11-year-olds and a 14-year-old at the video store they visited after school. He gave them quarters to play the games, one victim said, and then lured them back to where he lived with his parents, where he said they could play pool. He also offered to smoke marijuana with them, but actually only gave them tobacco. He also showed the boys child pornography, then pulled them into a separate room and forced them to perform sexual acts. Subsequent History: On September 16, 2004, Fairhurst was sentenced to 30 years in prison. Fairhurst, who is hearing-impaired, told the judge he suffers from schizophrenia and other medical and psychological ailments. But the judge branded Fairhurst "a menace to society" whose tendency to sexually assault children is "pathologically ingrained." Prior History: Fairhurst served time in 1996 for assaulting two other boys. Source: The New York Daily News, September 15, 2004

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Martin Fairhurst, a 28-year-old man with mental illness, lured four boys from a video store to his parents' home in Brooklyn, NY and sexually assaulted them between March and April 2003. Fairhurst befriended the three 11-year-olds and a 14-year-old at the video store they visited after school. He gave them quarters to play the games, one victim said, and then lured them back to where he lived with his parents, where he said they could play pool. He also offered to smoke marijuana with them, but actually only gave them tobacco. He also showed the boys child pornography, then pulled them into a separate room and forced them to perform sexual acts. Subsequent History: On September 16, 2004, Fairhurst was sentenced to 30 years in prison. Fairhurst, who is hearing-impaired, told the judge he suffers from schizophrenia and other medical and psychological ailments. But the judge branded Fairhurst "a menace to society" whose tendency to sexually assault children is "pathologically ingrained." Prior History: Fairhurst served time in 1996 for assaulting two other boys. Source: The New York Daily News, September 15, 2004

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Martin Fairhurst, a 28-year-old man with mental illness, lured four boys from a video store to his parents' home in Brooklyn, NY and sexually assaulted them between March and April 2003. Fairhurst befriended the three 11-year-olds and a 14-year-old at the video store they visited after school. He gave them quarters to play the games, one victim said, and then lured them back to where he lived with his parents, where he said they could play pool. He also offered to smoke marijuana with them, but actually only gave them tobacco. He also showed the boys child pornography, then pulled them into a separate room and forced them to perform sexual acts. Subsequent History: On September 16, 2004, Fairhurst was sentenced to 30 years in prison. Fairhurst, who is hearing-impaired, told the judge he suffers from schizophrenia and other medical and psychological ailments. But the judge branded Fairhurst "a menace to society" whose tendency to sexually assault children is "pathologically ingrained." Prior History: Fairhurst served time in 1996 for assaulting two other boys. Source: The New York Daily News, September 15, 2004

 

Date: 3/2003

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: Martin Fairhurst, a 28-year-old man with mental illness, lured four boys from a video store to his parents' home in Brooklyn, NY and sexually assaulted them between March and April 2003. Fairhurst befriended the three 11-year-olds and a 14-year-old at the video store they visited after school. He gave them quarters to play the games, one victim said, and then lured them back to where he lived with his parents, where he said they could play pool. He also offered to smoke marijuana with them, but actually only gave them tobacco. He also showed the boys child pornography, then pulled them into a separate room and forced them to perform sexual acts. Subsequent History: On September 16, 2004, Fairhurst was sentenced to 30 years in prison. Fairhurst, who is hearing-impaired, told the judge he suffers from schizophrenia and other medical and psychological ailments. But the judge branded Fairhurst "a menace to society" whose tendency to sexually assault children is "pathologically ingrained." Prior History: Fairhurst served time in 1996 for assaulting two other boys. Source: The New York Daily News, September 15, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Jason Naradzay, 39, was arrested after neighbors saw him walking with a rifle through the suburban Syracuse, NY neighborhood of Geddes on February 5, 2004. The weapon, which he dropped moments before a patrol car's arrival, had four rounds of ammunition inside and deputies said Naradzay had 21 more rounds in his coat. Police also found two index cards on Naradzay, highlighted in blue marker and signaling his intentions to kill a nearby couple and their three children. Naradzay's explanation for the list: "I'm an accountant . . . I do lists all the time." According to police reports, Naradzay said he wanted to kill the woman and her family because the woman broke off a six-month affair. At trial, the woman denied they had ever had a relationship. Prior History: Naradzay was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 14 years earlier and had been in mental institutions in 1990 and 1998. Subsequent History: On September 27, 2004, a state Supreme Court jury convicted Naradzay on two counts of attempted second-degree murder, as well as counts of burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. At the start of the trial, Justice John Brunetti dismissed three other charges of attempted second-degree murder against Naradzay. He faces five to 25 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 25. A court-ordered psychiatric evaluation in February found that Naradzay was able to understand the charges against him and stand trial. Source: Ithaca Journal /AP, September 21, 2004 The Associated Press, September 22, 2004 Newsday, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Jason Naradzay, 39, was arrested after neighbors saw him walking with a rifle through the suburban Syracuse, NY neighborhood of Geddes on February 5, 2004. The weapon, which he dropped moments before a patrol car's arrival, had four rounds of ammunition inside and deputies said Naradzay had 21 more rounds in his coat. Police also found two index cards on Naradzay, highlighted in blue marker and signaling his intentions to kill a nearby couple and their three children. Naradzay's explanation for the list: "I'm an accountant . . . I do lists all the time." According to police reports, Naradzay said he wanted to kill the woman and her family because the woman broke off a six-month affair. At trial, the woman denied they had ever had a relationship. Prior History: Naradzay was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 14 years earlier and had been in mental institutions in 1990 and 1998. Subsequent History: On September 27, 2004, a state Supreme Court jury convicted Naradzay on two counts of attempted second-degree murder, as well as counts of burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. At the start of the trial, Justice John Brunetti dismissed three other charges of attempted second-degree murder against Naradzay. He faces five to 25 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 25. A court-ordered psychiatric evaluation in February found that Naradzay was able to understand the charges against him and stand trial. Source: Ithaca Journal /AP, September 21, 2004 The Associated Press, September 22, 2004 Newsday, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Jason Naradzay, 39, was arrested after neighbors saw him walking with a rifle through the suburban Syracuse, NY neighborhood of Geddes on February 5, 2004. The weapon, which he dropped moments before a patrol car's arrival, had four rounds of ammunition inside and deputies said Naradzay had 21 more rounds in his coat. Police also found two index cards on Naradzay, highlighted in blue marker and signaling his intentions to kill a nearby couple and their three children. Naradzay's explanation for the list: "I'm an accountant . . . I do lists all the time." According to police reports, Naradzay said he wanted to kill the woman and her family because the woman broke off a six-month affair. At trial, the woman denied they had ever had a relationship. Prior History: Naradzay was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 14 years earlier and had been in mental institutions in 1990 and 1998. Subsequent History: On September 27, 2004, a state Supreme Court jury convicted Naradzay on two counts of attempted second-degree murder, as well as counts of burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. At the start of the trial, Justice John Brunetti dismissed three other charges of attempted second-degree murder against Naradzay. He faces five to 25 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 25. A court-ordered psychiatric evaluation in February found that Naradzay was able to understand the charges against him and stand trial. Source: Ithaca Journal /AP, September 21, 2004 The Associated Press, September 22, 2004 Newsday, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Jason Naradzay, 39, was arrested after neighbors saw him walking with a rifle through the suburban Syracuse, NY neighborhood of Geddes on February 5, 2004. The weapon, which he dropped moments before a patrol car's arrival, had four rounds of ammunition inside and deputies said Naradzay had 21 more rounds in his coat. Police also found two index cards on Naradzay, highlighted in blue marker and signaling his intentions to kill a nearby couple and their three children. Naradzay's explanation for the list: "I'm an accountant . . . I do lists all the time." According to police reports, Naradzay said he wanted to kill the woman and her family because the woman broke off a six-month affair. At trial, the woman denied they had ever had a relationship. Prior History: Naradzay was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 14 years earlier and had been in mental institutions in 1990 and 1998. Subsequent History: On September 27, 2004, a state Supreme Court jury convicted Naradzay on two counts of attempted second-degree murder, as well as counts of burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. At the start of the trial, Justice John Brunetti dismissed three other charges of attempted second-degree murder against Naradzay. He faces five to 25 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 25. A court-ordered psychiatric evaluation in February found that Naradzay was able to understand the charges against him and stand trial. Source: Ithaca Journal /AP, September 21, 2004 The Associated Press, September 22, 2004 Newsday, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Jason Naradzay, 39, was arrested after neighbors saw him walking with a rifle through the suburban Syracuse, NY neighborhood of Geddes on February 5, 2004. The weapon, which he dropped moments before a patrol car's arrival, had four rounds of ammunition inside and deputies said Naradzay had 21 more rounds in his coat. Police also found two index cards on Naradzay, highlighted in blue marker and signaling his intentions to kill a nearby couple and their three children. Naradzay's explanation for the list: "I'm an accountant . . . I do lists all the time." According to police reports, Naradzay said he wanted to kill the woman and her family because the woman broke off a six-month affair. At trial, the woman denied they had ever had a relationship. Prior History: Naradzay was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 14 years earlier and had been in mental institutions in 1990 and 1998. Subsequent History: On September 27, 2004, a state Supreme Court jury convicted Naradzay on two counts of attempted second-degree murder, as well as counts of burglary and criminal possession of a weapon. At the start of the trial, Justice John Brunetti dismissed three other charges of attempted second-degree murder against Naradzay. He faces five to 25 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Oct. 25. A court-ordered psychiatric evaluation in February found that Naradzay was able to understand the charges against him and stand trial. Source: Ithaca Journal /AP, September 21, 2004 The Associated Press, September 22, 2004 Newsday, September 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Southampton, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On February 4, 2004, 35-year-old David Glowczenski's parents dialed 911 for help in subduing their son. Four police officers from the Southampton, NY police department arrived and found him screaming and wailing incomprehensively. Within moments, all five were in a wrestling match. It took more than two minutes for the officers, using Mace and a stun gun, to get Glowczenski on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back. He continued to kick and scream, but abruptly stopped. The officers told investigators that when they turned Glowczenski over on his back, they noticed he was unconscious and not breathing. Less than an hour later, he was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital. Glowczenski's family said he was treated with unnecessary force. Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick of the Suffolk police homicide unit said the officers acted properly, and that Glowczenski, who was schizophrenic, had taken himself off his medication a week earlier. The incident began when Glowczenski overheard his mother and two brothers talking about their plans to hospitalize him. Subsequent History: On September 20, 2004, Glowczenski's family filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Village of Southampton, its Police Department and Suffolk County. The family also sued Taser International Inc. for $1 billion. The complaint said that Glowczenski was beaten, sprayed with Chemical Mace and shocked nine times with a Taser by the four police officers. The Suffolk County medical examiner's office termed the death natural, and due to "acute exhaustive mania due to schizophrenia." Glowczenski's family later hired an independent pathologist to review reports from two separate autopsies and other materials about his death.The investigator found that Glowczenski sustained injuries from excessive force and did not die from natural causes, the family said. In May 2005, the Justice Department opened it's own criminal investigation Prior History: The police had responded to calls about Glowczenski's behavior over 40 times in the past five years, according to Suffolk County police. His sister took out a restraining order against him in 2000 and 2001. Glowczenski had been institutionalized twice prior to his death. Source: Newsday (New York), April 11, 2004; New York Times, September 21, 2004; Daily News, September 21, 2004; Daily News, April 21, 2005; Long Island Newsday, June 7, 2005

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Southampton, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On February 4, 2004, 35-year-old David Glowczenski's parents dialed 911 for help in subduing their son. Four police officers from the Southampton, NY police department arrived and found him screaming and wailing incomprehensively. Within moments, all five were in a wrestling match. It took more than two minutes for the officers, using Mace and a stun gun, to get Glowczenski on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back. He continued to kick and scream, but abruptly stopped. The officers told investigators that when they turned Glowczenski over on his back, they noticed he was unconscious and not breathing. Less than an hour later, he was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital. Glowczenski's family said he was treated with unnecessary force. Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick of the Suffolk police homicide unit said the officers acted properly, and that Glowczenski, who was schizophrenic, had taken himself off his medication a week earlier. The incident began when Glowczenski overheard his mother and two brothers talking about their plans to hospitalize him. Subsequent History: On September 20, 2004, Glowczenski's family filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Village of Southampton, its Police Department and Suffolk County. The family also sued Taser International Inc. for $1 billion. The complaint said that Glowczenski was beaten, sprayed with Chemical Mace and shocked nine times with a Taser by the four police officers. The Suffolk County medical examiner's office termed the death natural, and due to "acute exhaustive mania due to schizophrenia." Glowczenski's family later hired an independent pathologist to review reports from two separate autopsies and other materials about his death.The investigator found that Glowczenski sustained injuries from excessive force and did not die from natural causes, the family said. In May 2005, the Justice Department opened it's own criminal investigation Prior History: The police had responded to calls about Glowczenski's behavior over 40 times in the past five years, according to Suffolk County police. His sister took out a restraining order against him in 2000 and 2001. Glowczenski had been institutionalized twice prior to his death. Source: Newsday (New York), April 11, 2004; New York Times, September 21, 2004; Daily News, September 21, 2004; Daily News, April 21, 2005; Long Island Newsday, June 7, 2005

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Southampton, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On February 4, 2004, 35-year-old David Glowczenski's parents dialed 911 for help in subduing their son. Four police officers from the Southampton, NY police department arrived and found him screaming and wailing incomprehensively. Within moments, all five were in a wrestling match. It took more than two minutes for the officers, using Mace and a stun gun, to get Glowczenski on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back. He continued to kick and scream, but abruptly stopped. The officers told investigators that when they turned Glowczenski over on his back, they noticed he was unconscious and not breathing. Less than an hour later, he was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital. Glowczenski's family said he was treated with unnecessary force. Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick of the Suffolk police homicide unit said the officers acted properly, and that Glowczenski, who was schizophrenic, had taken himself off his medication a week earlier. The incident began when Glowczenski overheard his mother and two brothers talking about their plans to hospitalize him. Subsequent History: On September 20, 2004, Glowczenski's family filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Village of Southampton, its Police Department and Suffolk County. The family also sued Taser International Inc. for $1 billion. The complaint said that Glowczenski was beaten, sprayed with Chemical Mace and shocked nine times with a Taser by the four police officers. The Suffolk County medical examiner's office termed the death natural, and due to "acute exhaustive mania due to schizophrenia." Glowczenski's family later hired an independent pathologist to review reports from two separate autopsies and other materials about his death.The investigator found that Glowczenski sustained injuries from excessive force and did not die from natural causes, the family said. In May 2005, the Justice Department opened it's own criminal investigation Prior History: The police had responded to calls about Glowczenski's behavior over 40 times in the past five years, according to Suffolk County police. His sister took out a restraining order against him in 2000 and 2001. Glowczenski had been institutionalized twice prior to his death. Source: Newsday (New York), April 11, 2004; New York Times, September 21, 2004; Daily News, September 21, 2004; Daily News, April 21, 2005; Long Island Newsday, June 7, 2005

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: Southampton, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On February 4, 2004, 35-year-old David Glowczenski's parents dialed 911 for help in subduing their son. Four police officers from the Southampton, NY police department arrived and found him screaming and wailing incomprehensively. Within moments, all five were in a wrestling match. It took more than two minutes for the officers, using Mace and a stun gun, to get Glowczenski on his stomach with his hands cuffed behind his back. He continued to kick and scream, but abruptly stopped. The officers told investigators that when they turned Glowczenski over on his back, they noticed he was unconscious and not breathing. Less than an hour later, he was pronounced dead at Southampton Hospital. Glowczenski's family said he was treated with unnecessary force. Det. Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick of the Suffolk police homicide unit said the officers acted properly, and that Glowczenski, who was schizophrenic, had taken himself off his medication a week earlier. The incident began when Glowczenski overheard his mother and two brothers talking about their plans to hospitalize him. Subsequent History: On September 20, 2004, Glowczenski's family filed a lawsuit in Federal District Court against the Village of Southampton, its Police Department and Suffolk County. The family also sued Taser International Inc. for $1 billion. The complaint said that Glowczenski was beaten, sprayed with Chemical Mace and shocked nine times with a Taser by the four police officers. The Suffolk County medical examiner's office termed the death natural, and due to "acute exhaustive mania due to schizophrenia." Glowczenski's family later hired an independent pathologist to review reports from two separate autopsies and other materials about his death.The investigator found that Glowczenski sustained injuries from excessive force and did not die from natural causes, the family said. In May 2005, the Justice Department opened it's own criminal investigation Prior History: The police had responded to calls about Glowczenski's behavior over 40 times in the past five years, according to Suffolk County police. His sister took out a restraining order against him in 2000 and 2001. Glowczenski had been institutionalized twice prior to his death. Source: Newsday (New York), April 11, 2004; New York Times, September 21, 2004; Daily News, September 21, 2004; Daily News, April 21, 2005; Long Island Newsday, June 7, 2005

 

Date: 9/2004

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: Karen Michelle Jefferson, 33, was shot after she lunged toward a police officer with a butcher knife at her home in Syracuse, NY on September 19, 2004. Jefferson had been threatening two other people with the knife when officers arrived at Ballantyne Garden apartments. An officer repeatedly shouted to Jefferson to drop the knife, and she then raised it over her head and charged at him. Once the officer shot Jefferson, he called for an ambulance and administered medical aid until paramedics arrived. Investigators said Jefferson had been acting irrationally and don't believe she knew the two people she had been threatening before police arrived. Mary Anne Singleton, an official at her apartment complex, said Jefferson has schizophrenia and receives government assistance for her housing payments. Jefferson was listed in serious condition at University Hospital. Apartment complex workers said she would probably be evicted because regulations there prohibit the use of drugs or violence. A grand jury will eventually determine whether the shooting was justified. Prior History: Years earlier, Jefferson had been evicted from the apartment complex for exhibiting threatening behavior, but moved back about five years ago and had not any problems since that time. Source: The Post-Standard (Syracuse), September 21, 2004

 

Date: 1/2004

Location: Middletown, Orange, NY

Summary: April Trinka, 20, tried to strangle a fellow patient at Middletown Psychiatric Center in Middletown, NY with a necktie on January 4, 2004. She was charged with attempted murder. Trinka told state police investigators that she found the tie in a box of donated clothing while she was a patient at Orange Regional Medical Center. Trinka took the tie with her when she was transferred to Middletown Psychiatric Center. She planned to strangle herself, according to court records. Subsequent History: In October 2004, Trink accepted a plea bargain that reduced the attempted murder charge to an attempted assault charge. Trinka was sentenced to five years in prison. Prosecutors requested 10 years. "You can be mentally ill, in need of care and treatment - even involuntary treatment - and still be competent to stand trial," said Marvin Bernstein, chief lawyer for Mental Hygiene Legal Services in New York City. Prior History: Trinka's mother, Linda, said her daughter was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder and had previous repeated stays in mental hospitals. She said the attempted strangling incident at Middletown began when she checked her daughter into the mental health unit at Orange Regional Medical Center in Goshen after her daughter stabbed a family cat to death. Source: Times Herald Record (NY), October 6, 2004

 

Date: 10/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: A woman jealous of her ex-husband's new wife scrawled swastikas on 20 different sites in Brooklyn and Queens during a three-day period ending October 18, 2004. Police said Olga Abramovich, 49, of Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, confessed to spraying the swastikas. She was charged with criminal mischief and related charges. Abramovich painted swastikas on Jewish synagogues and community centers at Sheepshead Bay and Manhattan Beach. She also targeted her ex-husband's car in front of his Ozone Park, Queens home and painted swastikas on two police cruisers at Coney Island. Abramovich, who is Russian Orthodox, resented her ex-husband, Lev Abramovich, 49, for marrying another woman, police said. According to a police source, Olga Abramovich suffers from bipolar disorder. Source: The New York Sun, October 19, 2004

 

Date: 9/2004

Location: Elmhurst, Queens, NY

Summary: Miguel Carrasquillo burst into Elmhurst Hospital Center in Elmhurst, NY on September 11, 2004 and shot and wounded a worker there before dragging out his estranged wife, Nancy, a clerical associate at the hospital, under threats of death. He carjacked a vehicle and raped his wife at a motel before forcing her onto a bus, prosecutors said. Carrasquillo, 33, was arrested September 13 in Fayetteville, NC, and he tried to escape the next day as police were returning him to New York. Subsequent History: In court on October 25, 2004, Carrasquillo said he was hearing voices in jail, prompting Justice William Erlbaum to order that Carrasquillo be evaluated in the Rikers Island infirmary. Carrasquillo's startling assertion came at the end of an appearance in State Supreme Court. He was arraigned the week before on kidnapping, rape and attempted murder charges, and faces life in prison. His relatives said there was a history of schizophrenia in their family and that Carrasquillo has shown signs of it since his younger brother died in a car accident six years earlier. Source: WPIX-TV (NY), October 26, 2004

 

Date: 9/2004

Location: Elmhurst, Queens, NY

Summary: Miguel Carrasquillo burst into Elmhurst Hospital Center in Elmhurst, NY on September 11, 2004 and shot and wounded a worker there before dragging out his estranged wife, Nancy, a clerical associate at the hospital, under threats of death. He carjacked a vehicle and raped his wife at a motel before forcing her onto a bus, prosecutors said. Carrasquillo, 33, was arrested September 13 in Fayetteville, NC, and he tried to escape the next day as police were returning him to New York. Subsequent History: In court on October 25, 2004, Carrasquillo said he was hearing voices in jail, prompting Justice William Erlbaum to order that Carrasquillo be evaluated in the Rikers Island infirmary. Carrasquillo's startling assertion came at the end of an appearance in State Supreme Court. He was arraigned the week before on kidnapping, rape and attempted murder charges, and faces life in prison. His relatives said there was a history of schizophrenia in their family and that Carrasquillo has shown signs of it since his younger brother died in a car accident six years earlier. Source: WPIX-TV (NY), October 26, 2004

 

Date: 10/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In Brooklyn, NY, Kwesi Ashun, an 18-year-old high school senior with bipolar disorder, approached Officer James Sinnott and attacked him with a knife on October 30, 2004, slicing his face from ear to neck. Officer Sinnott, who had been on foot patrol in Prospect Park South, called for backup. Responding officers Brian Risano and Matthew Koeth subdued Ashun - who was clutching a butcher knife and a folding knife - with clubs and pepper spray, but not before Risano suffered a head injury. Ashun was admitted to Kings County Hospital as an "emotionally disturbed person" and later transferred to Bellevue, police said. Prior History: A month before the attack, Ashun's family said he had became so depressed and withdrawn that they took him for a psychiatric evaluation. He was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and prescribed Zyprexa. Source: New York Daily News, November 1, 2004

 

Date: 10/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In Brooklyn, NY, Kwesi Ashun, an 18-year-old high school senior with bipolar disorder, approached Officer James Sinnott and attacked him with a knife on October 30, 2004, slicing his face from ear to neck. Officer Sinnott, who had been on foot patrol in Prospect Park South, called for backup. Responding officers Brian Risano and Matthew Koeth subdued Ashun - who was clutching a butcher knife and a folding knife - with clubs and pepper spray, but not before Risano suffered a head injury. Ashun was admitted to Kings County Hospital as an "emotionally disturbed person" and later transferred to Bellevue, police said. Prior History: A month before the attack, Ashun's family said he had became so depressed and withdrawn that they took him for a psychiatric evaluation. He was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and prescribed Zyprexa. Source: New York Daily News, November 1, 2004

 

Date: 10/2004

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: In Brooklyn, NY, Kwesi Ashun, an 18-year-old high school senior with bipolar disorder, approached Officer James Sinnott and attacked him with a knife on October 30, 2004, slicing his face from ear to neck. Officer Sinnott, who had been on foot patrol in Prospect Park South, called for backup. Responding officers Brian Risano and Matthew Koeth subdued Ashun - who was clutching a butcher knife and a folding knife - with clubs and pepper spray, but not before Risano suffered a head injury. Ashun was admitted to Kings County Hospital as an "emotionally disturbed person" and later transferred to Bellevue, police said. Prior History: A month before the attack, Ashun's family said he had became so depressed and withdrawn that they took him for a psychiatric evaluation. He was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and prescribed Zyprexa. Source: New York Daily News, November 1, 2004

 

Date: 11/2004

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Steven Boyd shot a delusional 44-year-old homeless man, according to authorities James Gaviglia, 38, underneath the Grand Central Parkway in Queens, NY on November 10, 2004. Boyd had been on the street since his mother died and he was evicted from her Brooklyn apartment four years earlier. He had been carting his mother's cremated ashes and talking to trees. Gaviglia had befriended Boyd in the days leading up to the shooting, police said. Boyd was arrested at the scene and later charged with murder and criminal possession of a weapon. Subsequent History: On December 21, 2004, a judge ruled that Boyd was not competent enough to stand trial and ordered him sent to a psychiatric center. An eight-page psychological report said he had schizophrenia, was on anti-psychotic drugs and should be hospitalized, defense lawyer Michael Anastasiou said. Prosecutors did not oppose the ruling. On May 31, 2005, Boyd was deemed competent to stand trial. Source: New York Daily News, November 14, 2004, December 22, 2004; Queens Times-Ledger, December 23, 2004; New York Daily News, June 1, 2005

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: East Greenbush, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On February 9, 2004, Jon W. Romano went to Columbia High School in East Greenbush, NY, where he was a student, armed with a shotgun and a plan to "shoot up the place" and then commit suicide. Romano, 17, randomly fired the gun in the direction of other students and injured teacher Michael Bennett before being stopped by Assistant Principal John Sawchuck. In Romano's statement to authorities, he told them his mother bought him the gun for target shooting and hunting. Romano also told authorities that he had "fantasies" of "shooting random people" for up to a year before the moment he decided to act on his impulses. Subsequent History: Against the advice of his lawyer, E. Stewart Jones, Romano waived his right for a trial and pleaded guilty to three counts of second degree attempted murder and six counts of first degree reckless endangerment for engaging in conduct which created a grave risk of death to other people and showing depraved indifference to human life. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Jones said Romano had been admitted to Four Winds Hospital, a psychiatric facility, in March 2003. Source: Troy Record (NY), November 23, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 24, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: East Greenbush, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On February 9, 2004, Jon W. Romano went to Columbia High School in East Greenbush, NY, where he was a student, armed with a shotgun and a plan to "shoot up the place" and then commit suicide. Romano, 17, randomly fired the gun in the direction of other students and injured teacher Michael Bennett before being stopped by Assistant Principal John Sawchuck. In Romano's statement to authorities, he told them his mother bought him the gun for target shooting and hunting. Romano also told authorities that he had "fantasies" of "shooting random people" for up to a year before the moment he decided to act on his impulses. Subsequent History: Against the advice of his lawyer, E. Stewart Jones, Romano waived his right for a trial and pleaded guilty to three counts of second degree attempted murder and six counts of first degree reckless endangerment for engaging in conduct which created a grave risk of death to other people and showing depraved indifference to human life. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Jones said Romano had been admitted to Four Winds Hospital, a psychiatric facility, in March 2003. Source: Troy Record (NY), November 23, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 24, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 28, 2004

 

Date: 2/2004

Location: East Greenbush, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On February 9, 2004, Jon W. Romano went to Columbia High School in East Greenbush, NY, where he was a student, armed with a shotgun and a plan to "shoot up the place" and then commit suicide. Romano, 17, randomly fired the gun in the direction of other students and injured teacher Michael Bennett before being stopped by Assistant Principal John Sawchuck. In Romano's statement to authorities, he told them his mother bought him the gun for target shooting and hunting. Romano also told authorities that he had "fantasies" of "shooting random people" for up to a year before the moment he decided to act on his impulses. Subsequent History: Against the advice of his lawyer, E. Stewart Jones, Romano waived his right for a trial and pleaded guilty to three counts of second degree attempted murder and six counts of first degree reckless endangerment for engaging in conduct which created a grave risk of death to other people and showing depraved indifference to human life. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Jones said Romano had been admitted to Four Winds Hospital, a psychiatric facility, in March 2003. Source: Troy Record (NY), November 23, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 24, 2004 Albany Times Union, November 28, 2004

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Retired Petty Officer Ambrose Kappos, 38, who suffers from bipolar disorder, broke into the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City on October 6, 2003 in an attempt to meet singer Sheryl Crow. Kappos said he believed Crow was communicating with him telepathically. He was charged with one misdemeanor count of intentionally stalking and a felony charge of breaking and entering. At trial, prosecutors said Kappos had also visited Crow's sister in Tennessee and her father in Missouri to profess his love. Subsequent History: Kappos was found not guilty on November 30, 2004. The charges against Kappos required jurors to believe that he broke into the concert hall with the intention of harassing Crow. Kappos testified he was merely a love-struck suitor who went to the ballroom to propose marriage because Crow told him to do so telepathically. After the verdict, Kappos acknowledged that he was delusional at the time of the incident. Source: New York Post, December 1, 2004

 

Date: 9/2003

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: Steven Koplan, 46, a computer programmer from Staten Island with mental illness, was accused of threatening to kill former NBC-TV anchorman Tom Brokaw and downloading a glut of child pornography. Between September 11 and November 21, 2003, Koplan inundated an MSNBC e-mail address with 3,500 messages sent from his home computer, including 13 that threatened Brokaw's life. After examining Koplan's computer in March 2004, authorities allegedly found 32 lewd photographs of children and hundreds of other pictures. In August 2004, Koplan was charged with 32 felony counts each of promoting a sexual performance by a child and of possessing a sexual performance. He was also charged with two misdemeanor counts of aggravated harassment for threatening Brokaw. A court-ordered psychiatric exam found he suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and delusion disorders, but declared him mentally fit to stand trial. His attorney said that Koplan had not taken medication for his disorders since 1997. Subsequent History: Koplan, 46, will not serve jail time because of his mental illness. Instead, the Staten Island district attorney's office said on March 18, 2005 that Koplan would be put on probation for 10 years and must allow probation officials to search his home computer. Source: Staten Island Advance, December 14, 2004; New York Daily News - March 19, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Claremont, Catawba, NY

Summary: On January 5, 2005, a man brandishing a double-bladed ax attacked the police department in Claremont, NC, smashing 13 windows and threatening an off-duty officer before police subdued him. Neither the suspect, 40-year-old Tony Allen Mitchell, nor any officers were hurt in the incident. Mitchell came to the police department earlier in the week asking to be committed to a mental institution. After the attack, officers served involuntary commitment papers on Mitchell. The attack caused about $2,500 in damage to the building. Source: Hendersonville Times News (NC), January 7, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Philip Pitcher Jr., a 21-year-old man with bipolar disorder, was charged with felony second-degree murder and felony second-degree arson in the death of his aunt, 43-year-old Lisa Pitcher, in Troy, NY on January 11, 2005. According to police, Lisa Pitcher had been stabbed, strangled and smothered sometime around 5:30 a.m. Then Philip Pitcher allegedly turned on the gas stove and set a fire in the living room before walking his 10-year-old cousin to school and himself to work as a temporary laborer. Four other residents were evacuated from the burning apartment building. Family members said Pitcher's mother in Florida was trying to get him down there for treatment, but he returned to New York before that happened to live with his father. After his father kicked him out, Pitcher moved in with his aunt. Subsequent History: Pitcher pleaded not guilty to murder, arson and reckless endangerment charges. Prior History: At age 14, Pitcher was accused of tampering with a fire escape at his school, injuring the principal. Although he was acquitted of charges, he was sent to a youth detention center for 18 months. Source: WTEN-TV ABC 10 (NY) January 12, 2005 The Troy Record, January 13, 2005 The Troy Record, January 20, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Philip Pitcher Jr., a 21-year-old man with bipolar disorder, was charged with felony second-degree murder and felony second-degree arson in the death of his aunt, 43-year-old Lisa Pitcher, in Troy, NY on January 11, 2005. According to police, Lisa Pitcher had been stabbed, strangled and smothered sometime around 5:30 a.m. Then Philip Pitcher allegedly turned on the gas stove and set a fire in the living room before walking his 10-year-old cousin to school and himself to work as a temporary laborer. Four other residents were evacuated from the burning apartment building. Family members said Pitcher's mother in Florida was trying to get him down there for treatment, but he returned to New York before that happened to live with his father. After his father kicked him out, Pitcher moved in with his aunt. Subsequent History: Pitcher pleaded not guilty to murder, arson and reckless endangerment charges. Prior History: At age 14, Pitcher was accused of tampering with a fire escape at his school, injuring the principal. Although he was acquitted of charges, he was sent to a youth detention center for 18 months. Source: WTEN-TV ABC 10 (NY) January 12, 2005 The Troy Record, January 13, 2005 The Troy Record, January 20, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Philip Pitcher Jr., a 21-year-old man with bipolar disorder, was charged with felony second-degree murder and felony second-degree arson in the death of his aunt, 43-year-old Lisa Pitcher, in Troy, NY on January 11, 2005. According to police, Lisa Pitcher had been stabbed, strangled and smothered sometime around 5:30 a.m. Then Philip Pitcher allegedly turned on the gas stove and set a fire in the living room before walking his 10-year-old cousin to school and himself to work as a temporary laborer. Four other residents were evacuated from the burning apartment building. Family members said Pitcher's mother in Florida was trying to get him down there for treatment, but he returned to New York before that happened to live with his father. After his father kicked him out, Pitcher moved in with his aunt. Subsequent History: Pitcher pleaded not guilty to murder, arson and reckless endangerment charges. Prior History: At age 14, Pitcher was accused of tampering with a fire escape at his school, injuring the principal. Although he was acquitted of charges, he was sent to a youth detention center for 18 months. Source: WTEN-TV ABC 10 (NY) January 12, 2005 The Troy Record, January 13, 2005 The Troy Record, January 20, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Philip Pitcher Jr., a 21-year-old man with bipolar disorder, was charged with felony second-degree murder and felony second-degree arson in the death of his aunt, 43-year-old Lisa Pitcher, in Troy, NY on January 11, 2005. According to police, Lisa Pitcher had been stabbed, strangled and smothered sometime around 5:30 a.m. Then Philip Pitcher allegedly turned on the gas stove and set a fire in the living room before walking his 10-year-old cousin to school and himself to work as a temporary laborer. Four other residents were evacuated from the burning apartment building. Family members said Pitcher's mother in Florida was trying to get him down there for treatment, but he returned to New York before that happened to live with his father. After his father kicked him out, Pitcher moved in with his aunt. Subsequent History: Pitcher pleaded not guilty to murder, arson and reckless endangerment charges. Prior History: At age 14, Pitcher was accused of tampering with a fire escape at his school, injuring the principal. Although he was acquitted of charges, he was sent to a youth detention center for 18 months. Source: WTEN-TV ABC 10 (NY) January 12, 2005 The Troy Record, January 13, 2005 The Troy Record, January 20, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Troy, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: Philip Pitcher Jr., a 21-year-old man with bipolar disorder, was charged with felony second-degree murder and felony second-degree arson in the death of his aunt, 43-year-old Lisa Pitcher, in Troy, NY on January 11, 2005. According to police, Lisa Pitcher had been stabbed, strangled and smothered sometime around 5:30 a.m. Then Philip Pitcher allegedly turned on the gas stove and set a fire in the living room before walking his 10-year-old cousin to school and himself to work as a temporary laborer. Four other residents were evacuated from the burning apartment building. Family members said Pitcher's mother in Florida was trying to get him down there for treatment, but he returned to New York before that happened to live with his father. After his father kicked him out, Pitcher moved in with his aunt. Subsequent History: Pitcher pleaded not guilty to murder, arson and reckless endangerment charges. Prior History: At age 14, Pitcher was accused of tampering with a fire escape at his school, injuring the principal. Although he was acquitted of charges, he was sent to a youth detention center for 18 months. Source: WTEN-TV ABC 10 (NY) January 12, 2005 The Troy Record, January 13, 2005 The Troy Record, January 20, 2005

 

Date: 10/2003

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: Michael "Ant" Morgan was arrested and charged with killing and dismembering his live-in girlfriend after they had a fight in their Buffalo, NY apartment on October 5, 2003. Susan Small, who had lived with Morgan for about 18 months, was strangled and then dismembered. Her body was discovered three weeks later in the apartment. Subsequent History: Morgan was convicted on January 12, 2005 of second-degree murder. State Supreme Court Justice Penny M. Wolfgang sent Morgan, who is diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and has an IQ of 143, back to jail pending his March 16 sentencing. Morgan, who periodically has been on a suicide watch at the Erie County Holding Center, must receive a prison term of at least 15 years to life. Prosecutors were pushing for the judge to impose the maximum sentence of 25 years to life. Andrew C. LoTempio, Morgan's attorney, said the conviction would be appealed. Source: Buffalo News, January 13, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: East Patchogue, Suffolk, NY

Summary: In January 2005, Alexander Rousseau, 50, was arrested for violating an order of protection taken out against him by WALK 97.5 radio station personality K.T. Mills. Rousseau apparently visited the radio station in East Patchogue, NY to drop off a package for Mills on January 17, 2005. He sent a second package through regular mail. Mills recognized the handwriting on both packages as Rousseau's. For more than 12 years, Mills had been the target of obsessed fan Rousseau, who sent her countless letters and gifts, including a wedding ring and mock marriage license. Although she has never met Rousseau, Mills said, "He thinks I've had a relationship and a baby with him." Mills was surprised to hear from Rousseau, because she thought he was living in a group home in Tampa, Florida. Rousseau was held in the Suffolk County Jail at press time on a misdemeanor criminal contempt charge, punishable by up to one year in jail. "I don't want to see him in prison," Mills said of Rousseau. Instead, she would like to see Rousseau get the psychological help she believes he needs - permanently. Prior History: Rousseau has had 16 different charges leveled against him in the last decade, according to the Suffolk County Police Department, among them aggravated harassment, trespassing and criminal contempt. He has also been remanded to mental health facilities in Suffolk County at least twice. Source: Suffolk Life Newspaper (Long Island, NY), January 25, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Bronx, , NY

Summary: A police officer shot and wounded a knife-wielding Bronx teen after the mentally disturbed youth lunged at officers on January 26, 2005. Nicholas Martin, 17, was hit by two police bullets in his family's apartment. Martin's aunt dialed 911 that night saying Martin had not taken his medication and was tearing up the apartment. Four officers arrived to find Martin sitting on the sofa. His aunt and uncle and their four children, ages 5, 9, 13 and 14, also were in the apartment. Martin agreed to go to the hospital, but became agitated when police would not let him get an extra shirt from his bedroom, which held a caged pit bull. Martin tried to push past one officer and then pulled an 8-inch blade out of the back of his pants when officers surrounded him. "One of the officers yells, 'Knife! Knife!' then shoots - bang, bang," said the teen's adoptive father, Nicholas Martin Sr. "He wasn't pointing the knife. It was low. I don't know if one of the cops got scared or trigger-happy." Martin was taken to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to recover. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the shooting appeared justified. The family plans to hire a lawyer. Prior History: Police had removed the teen from the home twice in 2004 without incident. Medications for schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder were found in the home. Source: New York Daily News, January 27, 2005;Greenwich Time, January 27, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Bronx, , NY

Summary: A police officer shot and wounded a knife-wielding Bronx teen after the mentally disturbed youth lunged at officers on January 26, 2005. Nicholas Martin, 17, was hit by two police bullets in his family's apartment. Martin's aunt dialed 911 that night saying Martin had not taken his medication and was tearing up the apartment. Four officers arrived to find Martin sitting on the sofa. His aunt and uncle and their four children, ages 5, 9, 13 and 14, also were in the apartment. Martin agreed to go to the hospital, but became agitated when police would not let him get an extra shirt from his bedroom, which held a caged pit bull. Martin tried to push past one officer and then pulled an 8-inch blade out of the back of his pants when officers surrounded him. "One of the officers yells, 'Knife! Knife!' then shoots - bang, bang," said the teen's adoptive father, Nicholas Martin Sr. "He wasn't pointing the knife. It was low. I don't know if one of the cops got scared or trigger-happy." Martin was taken to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to recover. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the shooting appeared justified. The family plans to hire a lawyer. Prior History: Police had removed the teen from the home twice in 2004 without incident. Medications for schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder were found in the home. Source: New York Daily News, January 27, 2005;Greenwich Time, January 27, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Bronx, , NY

Summary: A police officer shot and wounded a knife-wielding Bronx teen after the mentally disturbed youth lunged at officers on January 26, 2005. Nicholas Martin, 17, was hit by two police bullets in his family's apartment. Martin's aunt dialed 911 that night saying Martin had not taken his medication and was tearing up the apartment. Four officers arrived to find Martin sitting on the sofa. His aunt and uncle and their four children, ages 5, 9, 13 and 14, also were in the apartment. Martin agreed to go to the hospital, but became agitated when police would not let him get an extra shirt from his bedroom, which held a caged pit bull. Martin tried to push past one officer and then pulled an 8-inch blade out of the back of his pants when officers surrounded him. "One of the officers yells, 'Knife! Knife!' then shoots - bang, bang," said the teen's adoptive father, Nicholas Martin Sr. "He wasn't pointing the knife. It was low. I don't know if one of the cops got scared or trigger-happy." Martin was taken to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to recover. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the shooting appeared justified. The family plans to hire a lawyer. Prior History: Police had removed the teen from the home twice in 2004 without incident. Medications for schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder were found in the home. Source: New York Daily News, January 27, 2005;Greenwich Time, January 27, 2005

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Bronx, , NY

Summary: A police officer shot and wounded a knife-wielding Bronx teen after the mentally disturbed youth lunged at officers on January 26, 2005. Nicholas Martin, 17, was hit by two police bullets in his family's apartment. Martin's aunt dialed 911 that night saying Martin had not taken his medication and was tearing up the apartment. Four officers arrived to find Martin sitting on the sofa. His aunt and uncle and their four children, ages 5, 9, 13 and 14, also were in the apartment. Martin agreed to go to the hospital, but became agitated when police would not let him get an extra shirt from his bedroom, which held a caged pit bull. Martin tried to push past one officer and then pulled an 8-inch blade out of the back of his pants when officers surrounded him. "One of the officers yells, 'Knife! Knife!' then shoots - bang, bang," said the teen's adoptive father, Nicholas Martin Sr. "He wasn't pointing the knife. It was low. I don't know if one of the cops got scared or trigger-happy." Martin was taken to the hospital in critical condition but is expected to recover. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said the shooting appeared justified. The family plans to hire a lawyer. Prior History: Police had removed the teen from the home twice in 2004 without incident. Medications for schizophrenia and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder were found in the home. Source: New York Daily News, January 27, 2005;Greenwich Time, January 27, 2005

 

Date: 11/2003

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On November 11, 2003, Dennis Cherbavaz, a 50-year-old man with mental illness, led sheriff's deputies on a high-speed chase through his hometown of Rocky Point, NY, then violently resisted arrest and suffered a heart attack. The deputies were attempting to serve an order of protection filed by his sister after she alleged that Cherbavaz had tried to run her off the road in a car and break a chair over her head. Cherbavaz became incensed and fled, until deputies were able to catch up to him and pull him forceably out of the car. During the struggle to subdue him, Cherbavaz suffered the heart attack and was taken to the hospital. Cherbavaz was charged with felony reckless endangerment, as well as resisting arrest and menacing, both misdemeanors. Cherbavaz had been diagnosed as schizophrenic with bipolar disorder and had been admitted to psychiatric hospitals in New York and Massachusetts 23 times in two decades, said his mother, Diva Cherbavaz. She said she realized her son was a danger to himself two weeks before his arrest, had been on the phone with the Suffolk County Department of Health's crisis unit nearly every day, and even filed a police report against him for taking her 1993 Oldsmobile - just so he could be taken safely into custody. According her, Cherbavaz had recently lost his job and was upset over a custody battle between her and her daughter over the daughter's two young sons. "At least he is safe now," she said. "As long as he is in the hospital, he can't hurt himself anymore. That's the good part." Subsequent History: Cherbavaz died in the hospital three weeks after the incident. Source: Newsday (New York), November 13, 2003 Newsday (New York) April 11, 2004

 

Date: 11/2003

Location: Rocky Point, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On November 11, 2003, Dennis Cherbavaz, a 50-year-old man with mental illness, led sheriff's deputies on a high-speed chase through his hometown of Rocky Point, NY, then violently resisted arrest and suffered a heart attack. The deputies were attempting to serve an order of protection filed by his sister after she alleged that Cherbavaz had tried to run her off the road in a car and break a chair over her head. Cherbavaz became incensed and fled, until deputies were able to catch up to him and pull him forceably out of the car. During the struggle to subdue him, Cherbavaz suffered the heart attack and was taken to the hospital. Cherbavaz was charged with felony reckless endangerment, as well as resisting arrest and menacing, both misdemeanors. Cherbavaz had been diagnosed as schizophrenic with bipolar disorder and had been admitted to psychiatric hospitals in New York and Massachusetts 23 times in two decades, said his mother, Diva Cherbavaz. She said she realized her son was a danger to himself two weeks before his arrest, had been on the phone with the Suffolk County Department of Health's crisis unit nearly every day, and even filed a police report against him for taking her 1993 Oldsmobile - just so he could be taken safely into custody. According her, Cherbavaz had recently lost his job and was upset over a custody battle between her and her daughter over the daughter's two young sons. "At least he is safe now," she said. "As long as he is in the hospital, he can't hurt himself anymore. That's the good part." Subsequent History: Cherbavaz died in the hospital three weeks after the incident. Source: Newsday (New York), November 13, 2003 Newsday (New York) April 11, 2004

 

Date: 7/2005

Location: Queens Village, Queens, NY

Summary: Police identified Kevin Davy, 25, as a man with psychiatric problems who critically wounded two officers when they responded to a call that someone was attacking a religious statue outside a Queens Village, NY church with a sword and a shotgun. Davy began firing at officers Dominick Romano, 29, and David Harris, 40, and one of the officers returned fire, wounding Davy. All three men survived. Relatives said Davy attended the Art Institute of New York City, suffers from bipolar disorder, and had not been taking his medication. Subsequent History: Davy pleaded not guilty to attempted murder and other charges in Queens Criminal Court in September 2005. He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted. Prior History: Davy had a prior juvenile record, according to Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly. Source: New York Times, July 18, 2005; Daily News, July 18, 2005; Queens Chronicle, September 15, 2005

 

Date: 7/2005

Location: Queens Village, Queens, NY

Summary: Police identified Kevin Davy, 25, as a man with psychiatric problems who critically wounded two officers when they responded to a call that someone was attacking a religious statue outside a Queens Village, NY church with a sword and a shotgun. Davy began firing at officers Dominick Romano, 29, and David Harris, 40, and one of the officers returned fire, wounding Davy. All three men survived. Relatives said Davy attended the Art Institute of New York City, suffers from bipolar disorder, and had not been taking his medication. Subsequent History: Davy pleaded not guilty to attempted murder and other charges in Queens Criminal Court in September 2005. He faces up to 25 years in prison if convicted. Prior History: Davy had a prior juvenile record, according to Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly. Source: New York Times, July 18, 2005; Daily News, July 18, 2005; Queens Chronicle, September 15, 2005

 

Date: 9/2005

Location: New York, , NY

Summary: On September 7, 2005, Bernard Derr stabbed a 10-month-old baby in the stomach as the child was sitting in her stroller, out for a walk with her nanny on the streets of upper Manhattan. Derr, 48, lived only blocks away in an apartment run by the Federated Employment and Guidance Service, a supportive housing program for the mentally ill. The child, Isabelle Avins, was taken to the hospital in critical but stable condition. Derr was taken to Bellevue Hospital Center for psychiatric tests. Police said Derr had never been arrested but had a psychiatric history. Subsequent History: Derr was arraigned on September 9 in the prison ward of Bellevue Hospital Center. His court-appointed lawyer, Deborah Wright, said he was acting incoherently and was unable to answer questions put to him. But after Judge Donna G. Recant of Manhattan Criminal Court questioned him briefly during the arraignment, she ruled that he was not irrational and could understand what was going on. Source: The New York Times, September 9, 2005; Long Island Newsday, September 9, 2005; The New York Times, September 10, 2005

 

Date: 9/2005

Location: New York, , NY

Summary: Altagracia Rodriguez, a mentally ill woman who allegedly kidnapped four-year-old Josue Polanco from his mother at a New York City restaurant on September 8, 2005, had her own two children taken away by officials and she wanted a child to replace them, relatives said. Rodriguez suffers from schizophrenia and had stopped taking her medication, according to relatives, who called police to report the kidnapping. The boy was eventually returned to his mother unharmed. Rodriguez was charged with kidnapping. Source: Washington Times, September 11, 2005; Stamford Advocate, September 10, 2005

 

Date: 7/2005

Location: Poughkeepsie, Dutchess, NY

Summary: Roger Woodson, 47, a homeless Poughkeepsie man, was sent to a secure mental hospital after a judge ruled he was not legally responsible for a knife attack on Alvin Diaz on July 23, 2005. Woodson could give no reason for the attack. Diaz sustained wounds to his wrist, legs and chest, Chase said.A court appointed psychiatrist, Dr. Claude Schleuderer, found that Woodson suffers from schizophrenia. Source: Poughkeepsie Journal, December 24, 2005

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Harris, 24, attacked his 18-month-old nephew Priest Jefferson and the baby's parents after beating his own mother with a hammer inside their apartment on February 13, 2006. Cops responding to numerous 911 calls from neighbors found the little boy bloodied and lying on the living room floor as Harris held the boy's mother, Leasia Bolden, 20, in a choke hold and stabbed her on a nearby bed, sources said. After ordering him to drop the weapon, an officer fired one round at Harris, who stabbed his sister again before lunging at the cop, police said. Harris was shot once more and pronounced dead at the scene, sources said. Family members and sources said Harris was bipolar and taken out of an institution recently by his mother, 49-year-old Charlene Harris, a deeply religious woman and tenant association president. "He was supposed to be taking his pills. He just went berserk," said Carolyn Harris, his aunt. Police sources also said Harris was angry that his mother wouldn't cook him dinner last night. Harris had a 2005 arrest for drug charges and he had to be forcibly removed from the family's home in 2004, a source said. Source: New York Daily News, February 14, 2006

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Harris, 24, attacked his 18-month-old nephew Priest Jefferson and the baby's parents after beating his own mother with a hammer inside their apartment on February 13, 2006. Cops responding to numerous 911 calls from neighbors found the little boy bloodied and lying on the living room floor as Harris held the boy's mother, Leasia Bolden, 20, in a choke hold and stabbed her on a nearby bed, sources said. After ordering him to drop the weapon, an officer fired one round at Harris, who stabbed his sister again before lunging at the cop, police said. Harris was shot once more and pronounced dead at the scene, sources said. Family members and sources said Harris was bipolar and taken out of an institution recently by his mother, 49-year-old Charlene Harris, a deeply religious woman and tenant association president. "He was supposed to be taking his pills. He just went berserk," said Carolyn Harris, his aunt. Police sources also said Harris was angry that his mother wouldn't cook him dinner last night. Harris had a 2005 arrest for drug charges and he had to be forcibly removed from the family's home in 2004, a source said. Source: New York Daily News, February 14, 2006

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Harris, 24, attacked his 18-month-old nephew Priest Jefferson and the baby's parents after beating his own mother with a hammer inside their apartment on February 13, 2006. Cops responding to numerous 911 calls from neighbors found the little boy bloodied and lying on the living room floor as Harris held the boy's mother, Leasia Bolden, 20, in a choke hold and stabbed her on a nearby bed, sources said. After ordering him to drop the weapon, an officer fired one round at Harris, who stabbed his sister again before lunging at the cop, police said. Harris was shot once more and pronounced dead at the scene, sources said. Family members and sources said Harris was bipolar and taken out of an institution recently by his mother, 49-year-old Charlene Harris, a deeply religious woman and tenant association president. "He was supposed to be taking his pills. He just went berserk," said Carolyn Harris, his aunt. Police sources also said Harris was angry that his mother wouldn't cook him dinner last night. Harris had a 2005 arrest for drug charges and he had to be forcibly removed from the family's home in 2004, a source said. Source: New York Daily News, February 14, 2006

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: Michael Harris, 24, attacked his 18-month-old nephew Priest Jefferson and the baby's parents after beating his own mother with a hammer inside their apartment on February 13, 2006. Cops responding to numerous 911 calls from neighbors found the little boy bloodied and lying on the living room floor as Harris held the boy's mother, Leasia Bolden, 20, in a choke hold and stabbed her on a nearby bed, sources said. After ordering him to drop the weapon, an officer fired one round at Harris, who stabbed his sister again before lunging at the cop, police said. Harris was shot once more and pronounced dead at the scene, sources said. Family members and sources said Harris was bipolar and taken out of an institution recently by his mother, 49-year-old Charlene Harris, a deeply religious woman and tenant association president. "He was supposed to be taking his pills. He just went berserk," said Carolyn Harris, his aunt. Police sources also said Harris was angry that his mother wouldn't cook him dinner last night. Harris had a 2005 arrest for drug charges and he had to be forcibly removed from the family's home in 2004, a source said. Source: New York Daily News, February 14, 2006

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: Stephanie Lindboe, 65, was fatally shot after lunging at a a police sergeant who was responding to a disturbance call at her Staten Island apartment building on February 16, 2006. Ms. Lindboe, who had been hospitalized repeatedly for a psychiatric condition and had been known throughout the building for erratic behavior, had just stabbed a neighbor at least eight times when the sergeant and four other police officers confronted her, the authorities said. The woman she had stabbed, Linda Padula, 58, who lived across the hallway, was taken to the same hospital, and remained in serious condition yesterday, having suffered stab wounds to her head, neck, shoulder and upper chest, the police said. Source: New York Times, February 17, 2006

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Staten Island, Richmond, NY

Summary: Stephanie Lindboe, 65, was fatally shot after lunging at a a police sergeant who was responding to a disturbance call at her Staten Island apartment building on February 16, 2006. Ms. Lindboe, who had been hospitalized repeatedly for a psychiatric condition and had been known throughout the building for erratic behavior, had just stabbed a neighbor at least eight times when the sergeant and four other police officers confronted her, the authorities said. The woman she had stabbed, Linda Padula, 58, who lived across the hallway, was taken to the same hospital, and remained in serious condition yesterday, having suffered stab wounds to her head, neck, shoulder and upper chest, the police said. Source: New York Times, February 17, 2006

 

Date: 10/2005

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: Peter Braunstein is accused of posing as a firefighter and sexually abusing a woman on Halloween night in 2005. Braunstein’s lawyers contend that he suffers from schizophrenia and “had a substantial incapacity to understand the consequences of the actions charged." A defense psychologist who interviewed and tested the defendant between January and May, says Braunstein, 42, has suffered "psychotic breaks with reality," paranoid delusions and an inability to control his impulses. Braunstein, a journalist who once wrote for Women's Wear Daily, has pleaded not guilty to charges of arson, kidnapping, burglary, robbery, sexual abuse and assault related to the attack on a former colleague in her home on Oct. 31, 2005. Prosecutors say Braunstein set two small fires in the hallway outside the door of the 34-year-old woman's apartment in Manhattan's Chelsea area. With smoke filling the corridor, Braunstein pounded on her door, said he was from the fire department and demanded to be let in, prosecutors say. Once in the woman's apartment, prosecutors say, he knocked her out with chloroform, tied her up with a parachute cord and sexually abused her for more than 13 hours. Braunstein's mental condition is now stable because of medications at Bellevue Hospital Center and, for the past three weeks, in jail, Gottlieb said. The lawyer also said his client, who stabbed himself in the neck just before he was arrested in Tennessee in December, is on suicide watch at a Rikers Island jail. Subsequent History: During his April 2007 trial, Peter Braunstein’s lawyers adopted the defense that Braunstein was a paranoid schizophrenia, which crippled his decision making process and destroyed his ability to form intent to commit the crime. Braunstein was charged with drugging a woman with a chloroform rag and sexually assaulting her for hours. The defense case relied on "neuro-law,'' an emerging field at the crossroads of science and law that probes brain images for clues to behavioral proclivities and has reportedly been used in more than 100 criminal defenses. Defense attorneys claimed Braunstein's brain was so poisoned by undiagnosed paranoid schizophrenia that he couldn't form the intent to commit the crime necessary for a conviction. Subsequent History: On May 23, 2007, Peter Braunstein was convicted of kidnapping and sexually abusing a woman he barely knew after posing as a firefighter to gain entrance to her Chelsea apartment and tying her to her bed. The jury in State Supreme Court in Manhattan rejected the defense argument that Mr. Braunstein was delusional and so mentally ill that he lacked the intent to commit a crime. He was convicted of 10 counts of kidnapping, burglary, robbery and sexual abuse — every charge against him except arson. Subsequent History: On June 18, 2007, New York Superior Court Judge Thomas Farber sentenced Peter Braunstein to 18 years to life in prison for 10 counts stemming from a Halloween 2005 attack. The charges include robbery, kidnapping and sexual abuse. Braunstein was was found guilty in May of this year. Prior to the sentencing, Braunstein wrote a letter to Farber, in which he expressed remorse for his crimes and asked for the judge’s mercy. In the letter, he wrote that he was insane during the time he was committing the crimes—a fact which Braunstein believes the prosecution and jury overlooked. He also asked the judge to assign him to a facility where he may be treated for his mental illness. During his trial, defense lawyers claimed that Braunstein suffered from paranoid schizophrenia. Expert medical testimony stated that Braunstein was detached from reality during the crimes and could not have premeditated the acts. Source: Knoxville News Sentinel, 5/29/06; New York Post, 10/18/06; ABC News, 4/30/07; New York Times, 5/3/07; NEWS 1 TV, 5/11/07, 5/15/07, 5/17/07, 5/24/07; Newsday, 5/17/07; Long Island Press, 6/18/07

 

Date: 5/2006

Location: Yonkers, Westchester, NY

Summary: Robert Gjonlekaj, 35, was charged with second-degree assault, a felony, and endangering the welfare of a child, a misdemeanor. On May 28, 2006, Gjonlekaj kicked a 6-year-old girl in the face at a supermarket in Yonkers, NY. The youngster was treated at Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville for bruising and swelling to the left side of her face. She was later released. A witness in the store told police that she heard Gjonlekaj talking to himself before the incident. Gjonlekaj's mother later told police that her son was treated at the Bronx Psychiatric Center for schizophrenia for three years. Source: New York Journal News, May 31, 2006

 

Date: 2/2002

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Krisna Soogrim, 38, a construction worker from Guyana, was facing up to 25 years to life for killing Juliet Velaidam, 34, in their Hollis home on Feb. 7, 2002, before he took a plea deal under which he will serve 20 years in prison for the murder and for assaulting a police officer when he threw a meat cleaver. Soogrim blames his actions on Kali, a Hindu goddess, who is usually painted with a fearsome, warlike expression and sometimes is referred to as the goddess of dissolution and destruction. Soogrim, who has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, as well as delusional and psychotic illnesses, has claimed Kali came to him in a dream and had sex with him, defense lawyer David Bart said. Source: New York Daily News, April 6, 2006

 

Date: 1/2005

Location: Riverside, Steuben, NY

Summary: During the early morning hours of Jan. 13, 2005, James Russell testified that he had been off his medications and sleepless for four nights when he picked up a newspaper and saw the image of a demon on the sports page. Believing that the demon had made its way into the body of his brother's girlfriend, Carole Roth, Russell plunged several sharp objects into Roth's throat 45 minutes later, killing her. In July 2006, a Suffolk County Court judge accepted his plea of not guilty by reason of mental defect or disease. In recounting that night's events, Russell stammered and rambled for several minutes in court, and at one point was given a chair because he appeared unstable on his feet. Prior History: Russell had been living with his brother, William, 52, and Roth in their Riverhead apartment for about five years. Russell said a few weeks before the slaying, he began reading the Bible and stopped taking his medications for bipolar disorder because he felt the Holy Spirit inside him. Russell said after being alarmed by the newspaper photo of the New York Yankees pitcher, he grabbed a knife from the kitchen and went after his brother, convinced that he had been possessed. William Russell fled the apartment to call the police, leaving Roth alone with his brother. "In my head, I thought the devil had jumped from my brother into her," Russell said. When police found Roth, she had three knives, a pair of scissors and a barbecue fork still lodged in her neck. Russell was naked when he was arrested and during his police questioning. He was arraigned in the nude at a police station house in Riverhead because he refused to wear clothes, law enforcement sources said. After another hearing to determine his mental status, Russell will be transferred to a state psychiatric hospital. Source: Newsday, August 1, 2006

 

Date: 6/2006

Location: Canarsie, Kings, NY

Summary: Dwayne Palmer, 32, charged with stabbing his 1-year-old daughter to death must undergo a psychiatric examination before trial, a judge ordered on August 14. Palmer was formally charged in State Supreme Court in Brooklyn with second-degree murder and attempted murder in an attack on his companion, Natasha Martin, and their daughter, Samara Palmer, in Ms. Martin's apartment in Canarsie early on June 19, during the night after Father's Day. Mr. Palmer, who was arrested later that morning at his mother's house, gave a long statement to the police recounting feelings of alienation, routine miscommunications, money problems and perceived slights. Mr. Palmer went to Ms. Martin's apartment to visit Samara, found the door bolted and "came to the precinct looking for a police escort but could not get one," he told the police. He returned to the apartment alone and unlocked the door, using a key Ms. Martin did not know he had, prosecutors said. Ms. Martin tried to push the door closed; he was stronger. "He asked her if she loved him and she said no," the police wrote. "He got a knife from the kitchen area from the knife rack (wood handle). When she said 'No,' that she didn't,' he snapped. She was on the bed with Samara and he stabbed them. She was telling him she loved him while it was going on. He then left." Palmer’s lawyer, Michael A. Millet, entered a plea of not guilty on his behalf and requested the psychiatric tests. The lawyer described a series of hospital stays Mr. Palmer had undergone for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The judge, Matthew J. D'Emic, set a hearing for Sept. 7 on the results of the new psychiatric examination. He ordered Mr. Palmer held in jail, and he issued protection orders for Ms. Martin and her sons. Source: New York Times, August 15, 2006

 

Date: 6/2006

Location: Canarsie, Kings, NY

Summary: Dwayne Palmer, 32, charged with stabbing his 1-year-old daughter to death must undergo a psychiatric examination before trial, a judge ordered on August 14. Palmer was formally charged in State Supreme Court in Brooklyn with second-degree murder and attempted murder in an attack on his companion, Natasha Martin, and their daughter, Samara Palmer, in Ms. Martin's apartment in Canarsie early on June 19, during the night after Father's Day. Mr. Palmer, who was arrested later that morning at his mother's house, gave a long statement to the police recounting feelings of alienation, routine miscommunications, money problems and perceived slights. Mr. Palmer went to Ms. Martin's apartment to visit Samara, found the door bolted and "came to the precinct looking for a police escort but could not get one," he told the police. He returned to the apartment alone and unlocked the door, using a key Ms. Martin did not know he had, prosecutors said. Ms. Martin tried to push the door closed; he was stronger. "He asked her if she loved him and she said no," the police wrote. "He got a knife from the kitchen area from the knife rack (wood handle). When she said 'No,' that she didn't,' he snapped. She was on the bed with Samara and he stabbed them. She was telling him she loved him while it was going on. He then left." Palmer’s lawyer, Michael A. Millet, entered a plea of not guilty on his behalf and requested the psychiatric tests. The lawyer described a series of hospital stays Mr. Palmer had undergone for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The judge, Matthew J. D'Emic, set a hearing for Sept. 7 on the results of the new psychiatric examination. He ordered Mr. Palmer held in jail, and he issued protection orders for Ms. Martin and her sons. Source: New York Times, August 15, 2006

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 8/2006

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: Matthew Colletta, 34 was charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon in connection with a six-hour shooting spree that left one person dead, at least four injured, and a trail of shattered glass and bullet-scarred vehicles across Queens. The police said that Colletta has a history of mental illness. He is accused of having driven his green 1992 Cadillac through Queens late on August 25 and early on August 26, randomly firing at strangers while under the influence of cocaine and alcohol, the authorities said. The police were still searching for a motive. An official with knowledge of the investigation said Mr. Colletta may have believed he was being threatened by the Bloods, a gang identified by its red clothing, and that five of the seven vehicles fired on were red. The shootings began about 7:30 p.m. on August 26 in Maspeth. Andrzej Leonik, 47, was walking his dog near his house when a stranger pulled up in a car and shot him in his right knee. At 8:10 p.m. in Long Island City, a gray livery cab was fired at, the authorities said. Its windshield shattered, but the driver was not hurt. Next Udai Klemnarine, 22, was shot in the left leg outside a Chinese restaurant in Ozone Park, the authorities said. The Queens district attorney said the shooting took place at 9 p.m., though the police said it was at 9:40 p.m. Later near Forest Park, a brother and sister, aged 22 and 25, were looking for a parking space when bullets shattered the windshield of their yellow car, the authorities said. They were not hurt, and their names were not released. The shooting continued, and the gunman seemed to begin targeting red vehicles. Just before 11 p.m., shots shattered the windows of a red minivan. Flying glass wounded Ramsampy Veerepen, 23, in the right wrist, and Adesh Prolwah, 29, in the left arm, the authorities said. Within a few minutes, Todd Upton, 51, was shot on the Cross Island Expressway. Upton subsequently died at New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens. Only minutes later, two shots were fired at the front passenger door of another red minivan on the Whitestone Expressway. The 27-year-old driver was not hurt. Next, the police said, gunfire shattered the windows of a red Toyota RAV4 in the Queensboro Hill area. The Queens district attorney’s office said the 44-year-old driver was not hurt, but the police said he was injured by flying glass. Finally, about 1:30 a.m., the last victim, an off-duty police lieutenant, Arnaldo Alvarado of the 76th Precinct in Brooklyn, was fired upon in Forest Hills, the police said. He, too, was driving a red minivan. The district attorney’s office said he was hit, but not hurt, by flying glass, though the police said he was, in fact, injured. By then, police cars and helicopters were searching for the green Cadillac, and a patrol officer spotted it around 1:40 a.m. near Forest Park, where Colletta was arrested. He pulled his car over on a one-way street as police officers poured from their cars and blocked him in, witnesses said. Law enforcement officials said Colletta was taken to a Queens hospital after his arrest. Prior History: Colletta was arrested a week prior to the incident on charges of menacing and assault, after his girlfriend said he threatened her with a hammer, tried to strangle her and dragged her across the floor. Since then Colletta had been living in his car, the authorities said. A friend said Colletta had been taking lithium to treat paranoid schizophrenia. Colletta shares a two-story house with his father in Woodhaven. He and his girlfriend, Philomenia Zevlakis, 23, who lived two doors down, often had raucous fights, neighbors said. John Perry, who said he was Mr. Colletta’s best friend, said Ms. Zevlakis took out a restraining order against Colletta after the assault. Colletta, who had been released from jail without bail, was living in his car because his house was too close to hers. Colletta also was arrested in 2000 on drug possession charges, the district attorney’s office said, but the outcome of the case was not available. Neighbors painted contrasting portraits of Mr. Colletta, who they said grew up in the neighborhood. Margaret-Mary Hasselberg, 79, said he was a tough guy who walked with a swagger, yet still shoveled snow from her sidewalk and drove her to church during bad weather. Friends of Mr. Colletta who would not give their names said he was quiet and hard working but distraught over his deteriorating relationship with Ms. Zevlakis. Subsequent History: Todd Greenberg, the lawyer for Matthew Colletta, hinted at an insanity defense as his client was taken to a mental hospital. "His mental capacity is going to play a part in this issue on whether he had the intent to commit these crimes," said Greenberg. "From what I know of Matthew," said the lawyer, "this is out of character for him." But a police source yesterday raised questions about Colletta's penchant for violence, saying the 34-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic should have never been released without bail after allegedly assaulting his girlfriend on Aug. 20. "It wasn't like it was his first time in trouble," the source said of Colletta, who has a past drug conviction. Prosecutors said yesterday they requested $1,000 bail in the assault case. They noted the Queens man had no prior convictions for violent crimes. Colletta's arraignment was postponed as he was sent to a psychiatric facility, officials said. Greenberg said Colletta had been in and out of mental hospitals for years, including a stint at Queens' Creedmoor Psychiatric Center. "He's going to be held responsible either being confined to a psychiatric institution or being confined to a prison cell," said Queens District Attorney Richard Brown. The spree's first victim, Andrzej Leonik, 46, told the Daily News yesterday he was wearing a red shirt when he was shot while walking his dog in Maspeth on Friday night. Colletta told cops he fired at Leonik because he thought the "devil dog" was about to attack a baby, a police source said. Leonik said a neighbor was petting Sonya, his harmless Boston terrier. "This guy must have been on drugs or sick or something," Leonik said. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect in a weekend shooting spree in Queens that killed one man and injured five was pulled out of the jailhouse booking system for psychiatric evaluation at Bellevue Hospital Center, and the suspect’s lawyer said that he expected to base the man’s defense on his mental condition. Colletta was under observation at the hospital, where he was taken after becoming disruptive while in custody on Saturday night, said Richard A. Brown, the Queens district attorney. Prosecutors added weapons and drug charges to the counts against Mr. Colletta after the police found a second loaded gun in his 1992 Cadillac and cocaine in his pants pocket, Mr. Brown said. Mr. Colletta had already been charged with second-degree murder, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of a weapon. Mr. Colletta’s lawyer, Todd D. Greenberg, said his client had been hospitalized in the past and had been given a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Mr. Greenberg said that “He has been told what happened. He feels terrible about it. He says he would never hurt anybody. But I don’t think he has an awareness of his actions without being told.” He said he left his meeting with his client “more convinced” that Mr. Colletta was suffering from a mental illness at the time of the shooting spree. “It confirms in my mind that he was delusional and extremely, extremely paranoid. That fits in with his diagnosis and contributed to his actions,” Mr. Greenberg said. He said that he was not sure that Mr. Colletta would be fit for court proceedings and that he expected to base his legal defense on the argument that Mr. Colletta was not responsible for his actions by reason of mental disease or defect. Mr. Colletta is to be arraigned on murder, assault and related charges at Bellevue or in Queens Criminal Court but must undergo further testing to determine whether he is competent to stand trial and to participate in his defense, Mr. Brown said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent the week prior to the shooting spree snorting cocaine and sleeping in his Cadillac. By the morning of August 25, he appeared testy and erratic to a couple he encountered outside his home. The couple said they were parked outside his home about 6 a.m. after a night out when Mr. Colletta, who was watering his hedges, sprayed their cream-colored car. “I don’t like people parking in front of my house,” he told the couple, Mr. Madrow said, and continued: “Do you think you have more money than me? Do you think you’re richer than me?” About 13 hours later, the shooting spree began. According to the authorities, Mr. Colletta was under the influence of cocaine and alcohol during the shooting spree, which would have aggravated any psychotic episode. It was unclear if he had been taking medication lately. Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta, charged with a drive-by shooting spree in Queens that left one man dead and at least four others injured, told the police that he got his gun from Lucifer and that he was reacting to “red cars closing in,” according to prosecutors at a bedside arraignment on August 29, 2006 at Bellevue Hospital Center in Manhattan, where he was being held without bail. Most of the targets were chosen because they were in red vehicles, the police said. Colletta said he believed he was being threatened by the Bloods gang, which is identified with the color red. Prosecutors said Colletta described to police officers “red cars closing in” during the spree, said Marcus Franklin, a reporter for The Associated Press who was selected to represent fellow reporters at the arraignment. When arrested, Mr. Colletta gave police investigators several versions of the events that seemed contradictory and fantastical at times, prosecutors said. In one version, Mr. Colletta denied involvement in the spree, telling police that he left his car in the valet parking lot of a strip club and that “someone must have put the gun there; that’s not mine.” But he also told police investigators he had been temporarily living in his car and that he found the gun “in a container,” prosecutors said. The police have said that Mr. Colletta spent last week snorting cocaine and sleeping in his car, a Cadillac. Prosecutors said that Mr. Colletta possessed some cocaine and five bags of angel dust, and that he said he had “borrowed the gun from Lucifer.” State Supreme Court Judge Justice Fernando Camacho ordered Mr. Colletta held without bail and be given a psychiatric exam to determine if he is fit to stand trial. Todd D. Greenberg, a lawyer for Mr. Colletta, said after the arraignment that his client had a long history of mental illness and had been in and out of mental hospitals since he was 18. Mr. Colletta was diagnosed as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and manic depression, Greenberg said. Greenberg said that he entered a plea of not guilty for Mr. Colletta, and that the psychiatric exam would show that Mr. Colletta was incompetent to stand trial because he did “not understand the nature of the proceedings” and that he was “not responsible by reasons of mental disease and defect.” Mr. Greenberg said his client’s mental illness pushed him into taking drugs, which in turn “exacerbated his paranoia.” “When I spoke to him, I had to tell him what happened,” Mr. Greenberg said. “When I told him a life was lost, he was devastated.” Subsequent History: Matthew Colletta was indicted by a grand jury on charges related to the Aug. 25 Queens shooting spree District Attorney Richard Brown said on August 31, 2006. Brown, who was still presenting his case to the grand jury, said once the indictment is filed in the next few weeks the charges will be made public. Colletta was undergoing psychiatric examinations ordered by a judge to determine his fitness to stand trial. Subsequent History: On October 5, 2006, Matthew Colletta, 34, the suspect authorities believe was behind a deadly six hour bullet barrage seven weeks ago was arraigned during a brief court appearance. Standing before Judge Robert Hanophy, Colletta listened to a grand jury’s 57 count indictment brought against him after being transported to Kew Gardens Supreme Court from Manhattan’s Bellevue Hospital Center. The indictment listed charges of, among others, murder in the second degree, attempted murder, assault, criminal possession of a weapon and criminal possession of a controlled substance. Defense attorney Todd Greenberg entered a not guilty plea on behalf of his client, who faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted. In court last week, prosecutors added a 10th incident to the charges. Jeffrey Cuff, 39, of Westport, Conn., was driving on the Van Wyck Expressway when Colletta fired upon his black Audi. That incident undermines original reports that Colletta fired only at red vehicles because he believed he was being pursued by the Bloods street gang. Cuff was not injured. After his client’s arrest, Greenberg maintained that Colletta suffered from serious mental disease and defect. Colletta had been arrested a week earlier on assault charges stemming from a domestic dispute with his girlfriend, and Greenberg reported that he was a diagnosed schizophrenic. While reluctant to detail the specifics of the case he plans to make to jurors, after the Thursday proceedings Greenberg reiterated that his client’s mental capacity will play into his argument. Source: New York Times, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; New York Daily News, August 27 & 28, 2006; Newsday, August 27, 28 & 30, 2006; Gothamist, August 27, 2006; Houston Chronicle (AP), August 26, 2006; Boston Herald, 8/29/06; Associated Press, 9/1/06

 

Date: 5/2007

Location: Mount Vernon, Westchester, NY

Summary: On May 9, 3007, the 24-year-old grandson of Mayor Ernest Davis was arrested after he tried to rob a man on a southside street and then escape in a cab. Daniel Davis approached a 24-year-old city man at 2:15 a.m. on East Third Street, displayed a knife and said, "You got any money? Empty your pockets," police said. A police car happened by, Davis fled, and the victim flagged down the car. The two officers chased Davis around the Third Street corridor. Davis ran into the Pathmark Plaza parking lot and jumped into a yellow cab, but the officers stopped the taxi on Third Street. Davis jumped out and ran but was captured at 125 E. Third St. after a brief chase. Officers said they recovered a gravity knife from him. Daniel Davis was charged with first-degree attempted robbery, second-degree attempted grand larceny and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon, all felonies. The mayor said his grandson has bipolar disorder, often does not take his medication and resorts to drinking. Prior History: Daniel Davis has 10 prior arrests - four on felony charges, five on misdemeanors and one lesser crime. He pleaded guilty in August 2004 to criminal possession of a loaded firearm, a felony, and in 2000 to unauthorized use of a vehicle without the owner's permission, a misdemeanor. Subsequent History: On September 9, 2008, Westchester County Judge Barbara Zambelli postponed Daniel case against him at the request of his lawyer, Jacob Rollings. Ex-Mayor Ernest Davis, who was in the courtroom for the proceedings, said his grandson has bipolar disorder and may not understand what is happening to him. Daniel Davis was accused of trying to rob a man at knifepoint in May 2007.Davis’ sentencing to allow for a psychological exam to see if he understands the criminal Source: The Journal News, 5/10/07; Hudson Journal News, 9/10/08

 

Date: 9/2005

Location: Veteran, Chemung, NY

Summary: On September 17, 2005, state police were called to Michael and Rebecca Cannon’s home in Veteran, when someone reported a man wearing a bloody shirt was digging in the dirt near the home. Police discovered Rebecca Cannon's body in the home. It was determined later that she died of suffocation. Michael Cannon was indicted in January 2006 on a charge of second-degree murder in the death of his wife, Rebecca Cannon, 57. Subsequent History: A competency hearing was held October 4, 2006 in front of Chemung County Judge James Hayden, who ruled Michael Cannon was incapable of assisting in his own defense. In early 2007, Cannon was returned to Chemung County from the custody of the state Department of Mental Health, who said he was now capable of standing trial. Subsequent History: During the May 2007 trial of Michael Cannon, Chemung County Public Defender Nancy Eraca-Cornish pointed out that Cannon had attempted suicide in the month before the murder and had been involuntarily committed to a mental treatment program. Several witnesses testified that on the day of the murder, Michael Cannon was picking up dirt and gravel, packing it into a deep gash in the middle of his forehead. Cannon's injuries, which required hospitalization, were apparently caused by a fall from a balcony, witnesses said. Rebecca Cannon's children from her first marriage said they were seeking justice for their mother and were united in their stand to not be satisfied with any kind of plea bargain for the man they believe could have prevented their mother's death if he had taken his prescription medication. Martin Cannon of Middleton, N.J., a younger brother of Michael Cannon, said his brother was diagnosed with schizophrenia when he was still a teenager. Source: Elmira Star Gazette, 5/15/07, 5/17/07

 

Date: 2/2006

Location: Narrowsburg, Sullivan, NY

Summary: On February 3, 2006, Sheriff's Deputy Cyrus Barnes responded to a 911 call at William "Chris" Morris’ home in Narrowsburg. When Barnes arrived at the address, Morris fired on him. The bullet just missed Barnes, lodging in the seat of his patrol car. That triggered a 12-hour stand-off. Subsequent History: On April 16, 2007, William "Chris" Morris, 52, pleaded guilty to attempted aggravated assault on a police officer. On May 30, 2007, Morris was sentenced to 10 years in prison for firing at a sheriff's deputy. Morris' lawyer, Stephan Schick, read from a psychiatrist's report: Morris has a severe form of bipolar disorder with psychotic symptoms; post-traumatic stress disorder due his being shot during a home-invasion robbery at his family's home when he was in his 20s; and complications arising from severe neurological effects of Lyme disease. His illnesses cost Morris everything he had achieved in a very successful computer career, Schick said, and drove him into a terrible downward spiral. Sullivan County Court Judge Frank LaBuda said the court will recommend that Morris serves his sentence at the state secure psychiatric hospital in Marcy. Source: Times Herald-Record, 5/30/07

 

Date: 4/2006

Location: Schenectady, Schenectady, NY

Summary: On April 21, 2006, Nicholas Paniccia killed his grandmother, Marlene A. Hill, 75, by stabbing her in the neck during a psychotic episode. Paniccia was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia months before the killing. Paniccia told doctors that he heard voices telling him to kill his grandmother because she was reading his thoughts. He entered her bedroom and stabbed her at 2:20 a.m. He pinned her to the floor by flipping her bed over on top of her. He then left the home and drove into Albany. Albany police officers found Paniccia wandering the streets with self-inflicted knife wounds and took him to the Capital District Psychiatric Center. He was arrested later when Schenectady police learned of his whereabouts. Prior History: Nicholas Paniccia was hospitalized before killing his grandmother, after a psychotic episode in which he injured his father. He had stopped taking anti-psychotic medication at the time when he killed his grandmother. Subsequent History: On July 6 2007, Nicholas Paniccia, a 21-year-old Schenectady man charged with stabbing his grandmother to death, was committed to a secure psychiatric facility, Schenectady County prosectors said. Paniccia pleaded not responsible by reason of mental disease or defect, according to District Attorney Robert Carney. Paniccia will be held at the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Center where he will be evaluated by doctors to determine whether he can be released from the facility. Carney said it was only the second time in about 80 murder cases that his office had accepted an insanity plea. Source: Times- Union (NY), 7/7/07; HudsonsMostWanted.com, 7/7/07

 

Date: 7/2007

Location: Albany, Albany, NY

Summary: On July 1, 2007, Harrison Carnevale, 17, was killed when Marianne Williams, who had fled police minutes earlier, allegedly ran a stop sign and broadsided the car he was driving on Henry Johnson Boulevard. Williams has been charged with manslaughter in the death of the Latham teen. Prior History: Just days after police say she nearly ran down two dozen people during a 2005 chase through busy city neighborhoods, Marianne Williams threatened to "put two bullets" in the forehead of a city court judge. The threat was detailed in an August 2005 memo to then-City Court Judge John Egan from David Kelley, a psychologist at the Albany County jail. A day earlier, Egan had ordered county mental health staff to evaluate whether Williams understood the numerous charges against her. Kelley would later advise the court that Williams, now 31, understood the charges against her despite mental health problems. His report is contained in court records connected to her subsequent guilty plea, when 24 felony charges were replaced by a single misdemeanor. Williams served about eight months in the Albany County jail for that conviction, according to Sheriff James Campbell. Because she has at least two prior convictions -- including one for attempted weapons possession -- Williams could have been sent to prison for longer had she been convicted of another felony then. But prosecutors say the proof wasn't there. Williams’ lawyer says she is a sick woman who fell through the cracks. Williams, by her own admission, has struggled with mental health problems for years -- claiming, according to Kelley's 2005 report, to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and relying in the past on antipsychotic and mood-altering drugs. She has a lengthy criminal record, including a conviction for a June 2002 incident when she called 911 and told Albany police to "send a car to Myrtle and Grand. I'm gonna kill persons," according to court records. Williams, who already had a felony grand larceny conviction, pleaded guilty to attempted criminal possession of a weapon (a 4-inch knife) and served about 18 months in prison. Source: Albany Times Union, 7/12/07

 

Date: 7/2007

Location: Middletown, Orange, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2007, Ray Jackson, 42, was fatally stabbed at David Moore Heights, a housing project on Genung Street in the City of Middletown. Jackson was having a cookout with his family and neighbors in the public courtyard when Gilbert Judge Jr., 39, went on a tirade. Judge, who was visiting his mother at her apartment 20 yards away, began yelling about garbage around the house. Judge grabbed a knife, swept his mother out of her apartment and locked himself inside with her three adopted children, ages 7, 6 and 3. Judge’s mother, Christina Judge, asked Jackson for help. Jackson begged Judge to come outside and let the children go. Judge ran out of the apartment and began waving the knife in the air. People screamed and ran into their own apartments for safety. Jackson didn't run. He picked up an aluminum baseball bat to fend off Judge, but it was no use. Judge ran at Jackson and stabbed him at least twice, once on the left side of Jackson's chest and once near his left shoulder. Jackson's 19-year-old son tried helping him to his feet, but he eventually collapsed near the roadside. He was taken to the Horton campus of Orange Regional Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 10:53 p.m. Judge ran back into his mother's apartment. Police arrested him after convincing him to drop the knife, which was 13 inches long with an 8-inch blade. Judge has a history of mental illness. According to police, he had been released only three days prior to the incident from Arden Hill Hospital, where he had spent more than three weeks under observation for his mental problems. Source: Times- Herald Record, 7/14/07

 

Date: 7/2007

Location: Henrietta, Henrietta, NY

Summary: On July 21, 2007, 81-year-old Stephen Mox was found dead at his home in Henrietta. His son, Michael Mox, who has had several prior hospitalizations for mental health reasons, was accused of accused of fatally beating and stabbing his father. According to court records, Stephen Mox was stabbed with a kitchen knife and beaten with a fist and a wooden cane. Susan Love told Monroe County Sheriff's deputies she was in her West Henrietta home, talking to her husband on the telephone when her brother arrived at her door the night of the slaying; Love said she noticed blood on Mox's hand and a cut on his face. Subsequent History: On September 18, 2008, Monroe County Court Judge Richard A. Keenan sentenced Michael Mox, 43, to spend 25 years behind bars for first-degree manslaughter for the fatal stabbing and beating of 81-year-old Stephen Mox in their Acorn Lane home on July 21, 2007. Mox, who was diagnosed at age 19 as a paranoid schizophrenic, was originally charged with second-degree murder. But the prosecution allowed him to plead guilty June 19 to the lesser charge because of the probability that facts in the case would compel jurors to find him guilty of murder committed under extreme emotional disturbance, which warrants a manslaughter count. At his plea, Mox said he hadn't been taking prescription medication, became angry with his father, and heard voices. Source: Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, 8/3/07, 9/14/08

 

Date: 5/2007

Location: Union Springs, Cayuga, NY

Summary: On May 17, 2007, Jon Hewitt threatened his former girlfriend with two knives, forcing her to go with to his boat against her will, and restricted her movements. Subsequent History: On August 28, 2007, Jon Hewitt pleaded guilty to three counts related to an incident where he threatened his former girlfriend of two decades, something he said he wishes he could go back in time to erase. He blamed his "irrational" behavior on his bipolar condition and him not taking his prescription. Hewitt, 48, also pointed to his "self-medicating" use of alcohol that day. Cayuga County Court Judge Mark Fandrich ordered Hewitt to undergo a mental health evaluation. His sentencing hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, October 9. Source: Auburn Citizen, 8/28/07, 8/29/07

 

Date: 9/2007

Location: Niagara Falls, Niagara, NY

Summary: On September 5, 2007, Shauna Mahoney allegedly killed her 19 1/2-month-old son, Trevor Schneider, because she didn’t want him growing up to be like her. The statement was part of a confession Mahoney made to officers after she was arrested that evening. The confession, now part of a second-degree murder case against Mahoney, 20, paints a chilling picture of a woman police and others say began battling mental problems long before her son was born in January 2006. Mahoney told Detective Celestine Booze that she was alone with Trevor in the home she shared with her mother and her mother’s fiance, when she decided to end the child’s life because he wouldn’t stop crying. She also told Booze it wasn’t the first time she considered killing her son. “It was just me. I wanted him gone,” she said. “I suffocated him. I put my hands on his mouth and nose, and I pushed him down. Trevor was flailing around. He was moving his legs and arms, and I kept my hands over his mouth and nose for 20 minutes.” Mahoney told police that she waited for several more minutes after her son stopped moving before calling 911 to report that she had killed her son. “The [dispatcher] said to try and resuscitate him,” Mahoney said. “I didn’t even try.” During her arrest at about 6 p.m., as police clicked handcuffs on her, Mahoney told officers she didn’t care about what was happening to her. Subsequent History: Mahoney remained hospitalized in the psychiatric unit of Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center, where she was arraigned on September 6. A not-guilty plea was entered on her behalf, as is standard practice for murder arraignments. Police said Mahoney was being treated for “some type” of mental-health disorder. Prior History: Adam Schneider, the child’s father, said he dated Mahoney for about two years before they broke up late last year. He said that Mahoney had struggled with mental health issues since she was 17, had twice been taken to Niagara Falls Memorial Medical Center’s psychiatric unit for observation and had been institutionalized for a short period at a mental-health facility in Medina. Subsequent History: On May 1, 2008, Shauna E. Mahoney, the mentally ill woman who killed her infant son last summer, was sentenced Thursday to 10 years in prison for first-degree manslaughter. Mahoney had agreed in February to plead guilty to the manslaughter count. She originally was charged with second-degree murder and faced 25 years to life in prison if she had been convicted on that charge. She told the judge that doctors have diagnosed her with bipolar disorder and postpartum psychosis. Source: Buffalo News, 9/9/07, 5/2/08

 

Date: 9/2007

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: On September 26, 2007, fears of another Virginia Tech massacre gripped St. John's University after a student was spotted walking through the campus carrying a .50-caliber rifle and wearing a Halloween mask. The suspect, Omesh Hiraman, 22, an emigrant from Guyana, was arrested with the help of a police cadet, sources said. The loaded weapon, manufactured by Wolf, in Spain, carries just one shot, and while no other ammunition was found on Hiraman, police searching his Elmhurst home yesterday found another 50 rounds of ammunition. Police sources said that Hiraman told them that he was schizophrenic and hadn't taken his medication. Attorney Anthony Colleluori said his client, who transferred to St. John's from Cornell University, was being taken to a hospital, and that he "is exhausted, confused and sad." Hiraman was supposed to be in a business class when he was arrested, police said, but he walked right past it and did little to remain unobtrusive. Some witnesses said he appeared to be marching. The weapon, police said, was only partly concealed by a black plastic garbage bag, and his Halloween mask turned heads. The school was locked down and police searched each building, looking for a possible second gunman, a notion fueled by the fact that Hiraman took off his mask and removed clothing as he walked through campus, police sources said. By 5:30 p.m., with frantic parents racing to the campus, the lockdown ended. Subsequent History: On September 28, 2007, Omesh Hiraman, 22, was arraigned at his bedside at Bellevue Hospital by way of video conference. Hiraman’s parents stood by as he was arraigned on three charges, including fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon, which is a misdemeanor charge carrying a maximum sentence of one year in prison. Hiraman is also charged with two violations regarding the rifle – illegal possession of a rifle and a charge related to the rifle’s certification. Hiraman's lawyer says side effects from recent back surgery and medication for schizophrenia may have prompted Wednesday's incident, but he insists this was not a repeat of Columbine or Virginia Tech. Hiraman is scheduled to undergo a psychiatric evaluation next month to decide if he's fit to stand trial. The judge has ordered him held without bail until his next hearing, which is scheduled for October 28th. Source: Newsday, 9/27/07; New York 1 News, 9/28/07

 

Date: 9/2007

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: On September 26, 2007, fears of another Virginia Tech massacre gripped St. John's University after a student was spotted walking through the campus carrying a .50-caliber rifle and wearing a Halloween mask. The suspect, Omesh Hiraman, 22, an emigrant from Guyana, was arrested with the help of a police cadet, sources said. The loaded weapon, manufactured by Wolf, in Spain, carries just one shot, and while no other ammunition was found on Hiraman, police searching his Elmhurst home yesterday found another 50 rounds of ammunition. Police sources said that Hiraman told them that he was schizophrenic and hadn't taken his medication. Attorney Anthony Colleluori said his client, who transferred to St. John's from Cornell University, was being taken to a hospital, and that he "is exhausted, confused and sad." Hiraman was supposed to be in a business class when he was arrested, police said, but he walked right past it and did little to remain unobtrusive. Some witnesses said he appeared to be marching. The weapon, police said, was only partly concealed by a black plastic garbage bag, and his Halloween mask turned heads. The school was locked down and police searched each building, looking for a possible second gunman, a notion fueled by the fact that Hiraman took off his mask and removed clothing as he walked through campus, police sources said. By 5:30 p.m., with frantic parents racing to the campus, the lockdown ended. Subsequent History: On September 28, 2007, Omesh Hiraman, 22, was arraigned at his bedside at Bellevue Hospital by way of video conference. Hiraman’s parents stood by as he was arraigned on three charges, including fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon, which is a misdemeanor charge carrying a maximum sentence of one year in prison. Hiraman is also charged with two violations regarding the rifle – illegal possession of a rifle and a charge related to the rifle’s certification. Hiraman's lawyer says side effects from recent back surgery and medication for schizophrenia may have prompted Wednesday's incident, but he insists this was not a repeat of Columbine or Virginia Tech. Hiraman is scheduled to undergo a psychiatric evaluation next month to decide if he's fit to stand trial. The judge has ordered him held without bail until his next hearing, which is scheduled for October 28th. Source: Newsday, 9/27/07; New York 1 News, 9/28/07

 

Date: 9/2007

Location: West Saugerties, Ulster, NY

Summary: On September 26, 2007, Tracey Passaro, 37, was found dead inside her and her husband's home in West Saugerties after a person inside the house called 911 and said there had been a shooting. When police from several agencies arrived at the house, Anthony Passaro Jr., 40, was waiting outside and confessed that he had shot his wife, state police Capt. Wayne Olson said. The husband was taken into custody immediately, charged with second-degree murder later that day and sent to the Ulster County Jail without bail. Prior History: Anthony A. Passaro, the suspect's father, said during an interview that his son is "a very sick man" - that he was diagnosed with diabetes at age 4, suffers from depression and has multiple sclerosis, which caused blindness in one eye. Tracey Passaro's sister, Toni Del'Ostia of Yonkers, said on that her brother-in-law has a history of mental illness, tried to kill himself on more than one occasion, is prone to wild mood swings and has been in and out of psychiatric hospitals. Relatives said Anthony Passaro Jr. had two sisters and was home-schooled for a few years but never graduated high school or earned an equivalency diploma. He worked at one time as an electrician but lately has been on disability, relatives said. Subsequent History: On November 23, 2009, Anthony D. Passaro Jr. was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison for shooting his wife, Tracey, to death in their home two years ago. Passaro's sentencing, on a charge of second-degree murder, was delayed seven months because he was too sick to go to court. Passaro, 42, attended the hearing in a hospital bed. Passaro's lawyer, public defender Andrew Kossover, asked that the court show Passaro "some compassion" because of his medical conditions, which he said include multiple sclerosis, diabetes and a lesion on his brain, as well as past diagnoses of being bipolar and schizophrenic. Kossover said he's had no meaningful communication with his client since the trial, but Acting state Supreme Court Justice Roger McDonough noted two psychologists examined Passaro and found he was able to understand the court proceedings. Source: Kingston Daily Freeman, 9/28/07; Middletown Times Herald Record, 11/24/09

 

Date: 10/2007

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On October 6, 2007, Lee Coleman, 38, went on a bloody rampage after stealing knives from a Second Ave. restaurant. Coleman appeared to have super-human strength after attacking 56-year-old cook Amarjit Singh of Queens and mutilating Susan Barron, 67, an East Side psychologist, witnesses said. "After he got shot, he was still standing up," said Gus Kassimis, 36, who saw part of the attack from the Gemini diner he owns on Second Ave. "It took four cops to wrestle him to the ground." Coleman was taken to Bellevue Hospital in serious condition after he was shot. According to police, he faced charges of attempted murder and assault. Coleman’s sister, Teresa Gonzalez, said her was schizophrenic and bipolar and that he had been "really stressed" and "struggling" in recent days. Gonzalez said that her family was trying to get Coleman help just before the attack. Coleman, a former male model, was living a normal life until he suffered nervous breakdowns in 2005 and again earlier this year. He was treated each time at Jacobi Medical Center, said Gonzalez. She confirmed a news report that her brother had stopped taking his medication a long time ago because, "It made him sluggish. He thought it was doing him harm." Subsequent History: On October 15, 2008, Lee Coleman, 39, who brutally slashed Susan Barron on an East Side street was sentenced to 16 years in prison. Barron has had 15 operations and had to give away her beloved Scottish terrier because she was unable to care for the pooch. Cook Amarjit Singh, who tried to stop the attack, lost a piece of his ear, and said he can no longer work. Coleman apologized and said he was "not myself" when he snatched restaurant kitchen knives and went on a rampage on October 6, 2007. Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Rena Uviller blamed the attack on authorities' failure to enforce laws that are supposed to keep the mentally ill on their medications. Source: NY Daily News, 10/8/07; Channel 2 News (NY), 10/9/07; New York Daily News, 10/15/08

 

Date: 10/2007

Location: Bronx, Bronx, NY

Summary: On October 6, 2007, Lee Coleman, 38, went on a bloody rampage after stealing knives from a Second Ave. restaurant. Coleman appeared to have super-human strength after attacking 56-year-old cook Amarjit Singh of Queens and mutilating Susan Barron, 67, an East Side psychologist, witnesses said. "After he got shot, he was still standing up," said Gus Kassimis, 36, who saw part of the attack from the Gemini diner he owns on Second Ave. "It took four cops to wrestle him to the ground." Coleman was taken to Bellevue Hospital in serious condition after he was shot. According to police, he faced charges of attempted murder and assault. Coleman’s sister, Teresa Gonzalez, said her was schizophrenic and bipolar and that he had been "really stressed" and "struggling" in recent days. Gonzalez said that her family was trying to get Coleman help just before the attack. Coleman, a former male model, was living a normal life until he suffered nervous breakdowns in 2005 and again earlier this year. He was treated each time at Jacobi Medical Center, said Gonzalez. She confirmed a news report that her brother had stopped taking his medication a long time ago because, "It made him sluggish. He thought it was doing him harm." Subsequent History: On October 15, 2008, Lee Coleman, 39, who brutally slashed Susan Barron on an East Side street was sentenced to 16 years in prison. Barron has had 15 operations and had to give away her beloved Scottish terrier because she was unable to care for the pooch. Cook Amarjit Singh, who tried to stop the attack, lost a piece of his ear, and said he can no longer work. Coleman apologized and said he was "not myself" when he snatched restaurant kitchen knives and went on a rampage on October 6, 2007. Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Rena Uviller blamed the attack on authorities' failure to enforce laws that are supposed to keep the mentally ill on their medications. Source: NY Daily News, 10/8/07; Channel 2 News (NY), 10/9/07; New York Daily News, 10/15/08

 

Date: 11/2006

Location: Manorville, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On November 18, 2006, Carolyn Buonnano was arrested after fatally stabbing her husband, Raymond, 43, three times on the neck before slitting her own throat in a botched suicide attempt. Buonnano was charged with second-degree murder. Subsequent History: On February 11, 2008, Carolyn Buonnano, who stabbed her husband to death in an apparently unprovoked attack in their home entered an insanity plea. In a deal with prosecutors, Buonnano, 39, entered a plea of not responsible by reason of mental disease in Suffolk County Court. Judge James Hudson ordered Buonnano to undergo treatment at a psychiatric hospital. Her attorney, Eric W. Naiburg of Central Islip, said a forensic psychologist testified that Buonnano was psychotic before and after the event. The couple had a good marriage that was interrupted by her mental disease, Naiburg said. "She was a paranoid schizophrenic and she believed he was trying to do her wrong," Naiburg said. Assistant District Attorney Nancy Clifford said Buonnano was "unable to appreciate the nature of what she did." Source: Newsday, 2/12/08

 

Date: 1/2008

Location: New Hartford, Oneida, NY

Summary: In January 2008, 19-year-old Kevin Adams fatally stabbed his grandfather, 81-year-old of Edward Bogan, a longtime aide to former Congressman Sherwood Boehlert. Subsequent History: On February 12, 2008, New Hartford Town Justice William Virkler ruled that Kevin Adams, charged with murdering his grandfather, was competent to stand trial. Oneida County Chief Public Defender Frank Nebush said he planned to pursue an insanity defense for Adams. Nebush said Adams suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and was being treated at Central New York Psychiatric Center in Marcy, near Utica. Subsequent History: On April 10, 2008, 19-year-old Kevin Adams entered a plea of insanity in Oneida County Court related to the January stabbing death of his grandfather, Edward Bogan. Adams was charged January 4 with second-degree murder after he told police that he stabbed 80-year-old Bogan inside the relative’s Clinton House apartment. Prior History: Since Adams’ arrest, public defender, Frank Nebush Jr., has continuously argued that Adams suffers from paranoid schizophrenia and was most likely acting on “delusions” when he killed his grandfather. Adams was been examined by both defense and prosecution psychiatrists, and their conclusion was that Adams suffers from some form of mental defect, attorneys said. Source: Newsday, 2/13/08; Utica Observer Dispatch, 4/10/08, 11/6/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On February 12, 2008, Kathryn Faughey, a psychologist, was fatally stabbed in her Manhattan office as she saw patients late into the evening. Faughey was stabbed 15 times. Dr. Kent Shinbach, who shared a suite with Faughey and tried to help, was also stabbed but recovered from his wounds. Faughey had been practicing on the Upper East Side for more than two decades. She was alone in her office when a man showed up at the East 79th Street building that houses the suite she shared with Shinbach and three other therapists. The man entered Faughey's office and attacked her with a meat cleaver and a 9-inch knife, police said. Subsequent History: On February 16, 2008, 39-year-old David Tarloff, who was treated for schizophrenia at a Staten Island psychiatric facility, was arrested for the murder of Dr. Kathryn Faughey after investigators matched his palm prints with those at the bloody crime scene where Dr. Faughey was killed. Police said he told investigators he had set out to rob a psychiatrist he said had institutionalized him 17 years ago, but ended up in Dr. Faughey's office. Police said it remained unclear why Tarloff would have attacked Dr. Faughey. A psychiatrist who worked nearby, Dr. Kent Shinbach, came to Dr. Faughey's aid and was badly injured. Police couldn't confirm whether Tarloff was ever Dr. Shinbach's patient, or whether he'd met Dr. Faughey. Robert Tarloff, Tarloff’s brother said his own family had unsuccessfully tried to keep his brother institutionalized. "My father and I and our mother all tried our best to keep him [David] in the facilities that he was hospitalized in over the many, many years of his illness, and they kept releasing him even after we've told them what has been going on with his situation," Robert Tarloff said. "We did the best that we could asking them to keep him in there and they didn't." Subsequent History: At his February 17, arraignment, David Tarloff was all but incoherent during the five-minute proceeding in Manhattan Criminal Court. Tarloff said his Legal Aid lawyer, Reginald Sharpe, was not an attorney. Acting Supreme Court Justice Ruth Pickholz ordered Tarloff be taken to Bellevue Hospital, where he was to undergo a psychological evaluation to determine if he was mentally competent to stand trial. Tarloff was charged with second-degree murder, second-degree attempted murder and first-degree assault, in connection with the therapist's slaying. Prior History: Tarloff had been arrested earlier in February on charges of punching a security guard in the face after being asked to leave St. John's Episcopal Hospital in Queens. It wasn't clear why Tarloff had been at the hospital. According to a health care professional at Staten Island University Hospital where Tarloff was treated for schizophrenia last summer, Tarloff's mental illness has landed him in court before. The source said Tarloff had been a patient at the psychiatric ward in the Ocean Breeze facility for as many as seven months last year, and on several occasions, court orders had be obtained in Supreme Court in St. George, so doctors could administer medication to treat his schizophrenia. Subsequent History: On October 14, 2008, Justice Charles H. Solomon of State Supreme Court in Manhattan ruled that David Tarloff was mentally unfit to stand trial, and ordered that he be sent to a state psychiatric institution. The ruling came one week after two court-appointed psychiatrists found that Tarloff had become so withdrawn that he would be unable to assist in his own defense. Mr. Tarloff’s lawyer, Bryan Konoski, has said that since his arrest shortly after the killing, Tarloff’s mental health has been up and down. He added that at times, Mr. Tarloff was stable while medicated, but that his condition was now worse than ever. Mr. Tarloff has not been speaking with anyone — not even his father, who used to visit him periodically, according to one of the psychiatric reports filed with the court last week. The death of Mr. Tarloff’s mother during the summer might have pushed him into a deep depression, Mr. Konoski said. A report by Tarloff’s psychiatrists said that he had not been taking his medication, and that he was on suicide watch. In June, a judge issued a ruling allowing doctors to force Tarloff to take his medication, but Konoski said he thought the order might have expired. The state institution where Tarloff is sent could get another judge to issue a force order, he said. Tarloff must remain institutionalized “until some time that he is fit to proceed,” Justice Solomon said. Subsequent History: On October 18, 2010, two psychiatrists told a judge that David Tarloff wasn't mentally competent to stand trial, which was set to begin. Jury selection was halted but the judge scheduled another psychiatric examination at the request of prosecutors. The judge declared a mistrial. Source: Newsday, 2/14/08, 2/15/08; New York Daily News, 2/18/08, 6/10/08, 10/15/08, 4/8/10; Times News (NC), 2/18/08, 2/20/08, 6/11/08; Staten Island Advance, 2/18/08; New York Times, 2/19/08, 4/16/08, 10/7/08, 10/17/10; WNBC TV, 2/19/08; NY Post, 2/22/08

 

Date: 10/2005

Location: Bay Shore, Suffolk, NY

Summary: On October 21, 2005, Elden MacFarlane, a former Green Beret, picked up a kitchen knife and repeatedly plunged it into Regina Jones MacFarlane's neck in their Bay Shore home. Prior History: On February 13, 2008, at Elden MacFarlane’s murder trial, Dr. Alexander Sasha Bardey of Manhattan, a forensic psychiatrist, testified that four years before he killed his future wife, MacFarlane had returned home from Operation Desert Storm and was diagnosed by a military doctor as being depressed testified. And, in the years that followed, MacFarlane was caught in a spiraling descent toward paranoid schizophrenia that included obsessive thoughts about the smell of melted bodies in Kuwait, religious delirium that made him hammer a metal spike into his right hand in Delaware, and driving a car through backyards in North Carolina, Dr. Bardey testified. On the day of the murder, Bardey told the jury, MacFarlane "lacked substantial capacity to know that what he was doing was wrong." Bardey' is defense attorney William Ferris' star witness - a scientific voice showing that MacFarlane was mentally ill before the slaying and therefore should be sent to a hospital, not to prison for as much as 25 years to life, for his wife's killing. Pointing to medical records that date to 2001, Bardey told the jury MacFarlane's father and brother also suffered from mental illness, and explained that paranoid schizophrenia grows worse over years before reaching a boiling point. Source: Newsday, 2/14/08, 2/15/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On February 12, 2008, Kathryn Faughey, a psychologist, was fatally stabbed in her Manhattan office as she saw patients late into the evening. Faughey was stabbed 15 times. Dr. Kent Shinbach, who shared a suite with Faughey and tried to help, was also stabbed but recovered from his wounds. Faughey had been practicing on the Upper East Side for more than two decades. She was alone in her office when a man showed up at the East 79th Street building that houses the suite she shared with Shinbach and three other therapists. The man entered Faughey's office and attacked her with a meat cleaver and a 9-inch knife, police said. Subsequent History: On February 16, 2008, 39-year-old David Tarloff, who was treated for schizophrenia at a Staten Island psychiatric facility, was arrested for the murder of Dr. Kathryn Faughey after investigators matched his palm prints with those at the bloody crime scene where Dr. Faughey was killed. Police said he told investigators he had set out to rob a psychiatrist he said had institutionalized him 17 years ago, but ended up in Dr. Faughey's office. Police said it remained unclear why Tarloff would have attacked Dr. Faughey. A psychiatrist who worked nearby, Dr. Kent Shinbach, came to Dr. Faughey's aid and was badly injured. Police couldn't confirm whether Tarloff was ever Dr. Shinbach's patient, or whether he'd met Dr. Faughey. Robert Tarloff, Tarloff’s brother said his own family had unsuccessfully tried to keep his brother institutionalized. "My father and I and our mother all tried our best to keep him [David] in the facilities that he was hospitalized in over the many, many years of his illness, and they kept releasing him even after we've told them what has been going on with his situation," Robert Tarloff said. "We did the best that we could asking them to keep him in there and they didn't." Subsequent History: At his February 17, arraignment, David Tarloff was all but incoherent during the five-minute proceeding in Manhattan Criminal Court. Tarloff said his Legal Aid lawyer, Reginald Sharpe, was not an attorney. Acting Supreme Court Justice Ruth Pickholz ordered Tarloff be taken to Bellevue Hospital, where he was to undergo a psychological evaluation to determine if he was mentally competent to stand trial. Tarloff was charged with second-degree murder, second-degree attempted murder and first-degree assault, in connection with the therapist's slaying. Prior History: Tarloff had been arrested earlier in February on charges of punching a security guard in the face after being asked to leave St. John's Episcopal Hospital in Queens. It wasn't clear why Tarloff had been at the hospital. According to a health care professional at Staten Island University Hospital where Tarloff was treated for schizophrenia last summer, Tarloff's mental illness has landed him in court before. The source said Tarloff had been a patient at the psychiatric ward in the Ocean Breeze facility for as many as seven months last year, and on several occasions, court orders had be obtained in Supreme Court in St. George, so doctors could administer medication to treat his schizophrenia. Subsequent History: On October 14, 2008, Justice Charles H. Solomon of State Supreme Court in Manhattan ruled that David Tarloff was mentally unfit to stand trial, and ordered that he be sent to a state psychiatric institution. The ruling came one week after two court-appointed psychiatrists found that Tarloff had become so withdrawn that he would be unable to assist in his own defense. Mr. Tarloff’s lawyer, Bryan Konoski, has said that since his arrest shortly after the killing, Tarloff’s mental health has been up and down. He added that at times, Mr. Tarloff was stable while medicated, but that his condition was now worse than ever. Mr. Tarloff has not been speaking with anyone — not even his father, who used to visit him periodically, according to one of the psychiatric reports filed with the court last week. The death of Mr. Tarloff’s mother during the summer might have pushed him into a deep depression, Mr. Konoski said. A report by Tarloff’s psychiatrists said that he had not been taking his medication, and that he was on suicide watch. In June, a judge issued a ruling allowing doctors to force Tarloff to take his medication, but Konoski said he thought the order might have expired. The state institution where Tarloff is sent could get another judge to issue a force order, he said. Tarloff must remain institutionalized “until some time that he is fit to proceed,” Justice Solomon said. Subsequent History: On October 18, 2010, two psychiatrists told a judge that David Tarloff wasn't mentally competent to stand trial, which was set to begin. Jury selection was halted but the judge scheduled another psychiatric examination at the request of prosecutors. The judge declared a mistrial. Source: Newsday, 2/14/08, 2/15/08; New York Daily News, 2/18/08, 6/10/08, 10/15/08, 4/8/10; Times News (NC), 2/18/08, 2/20/08, 6/11/08; Staten Island Advance, 2/18/08; New York Times, 2/19/08, 4/16/08, 10/7/08, 10/17/10; WNBC TV, 2/19/08; NY Post, 2/22/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Massena, Saint Lawrence, NY

Summary: On January 31, 2008, Harry Klages II, 25, allegedly attackeded Andrew W. Lesperance, 51, with a knife leaving the man barely clinging to life in the younger man's South Main Street apartment. Klages brutally mutilated Lesperance by gouging out his eyeball, cutting off his genitals and slicing into his other eye and abdomen. Prior History: Harry E. Klages II began showing signs of a troubled mind early on in his life. He exhibited evidence of mental illness "since he was a small child" and, at age 17, was being treated for alcohol problems said his father, Harry E. Klages Sr. Despite Klages's criminal record, expulsion from SUNY Cobleskill for bizarre behavior and a history of being in and out of various mental health and alcohol abuse programs and facilities, many who knew him never suspected he might be capable of brutally mutilating Lesperance. Those who knew or met Klages describe a young man who, depending on whether he was drunk or sober, could be a monster or friendly but who was deeply troubled. Klages was learning-disabled since childhood and suffered from schizophrenia at an early age, said his father. "Every six months or a year he was sent to rehab by me until he moved out," Mr. Klages said. "They said he had serious mental health problems then." Mrs. Klages, who moved into the household about five years ago, said she knew right from the start that Klages was deeply troubled. "He drew demonic, ghoulish pictures ... his entire room, the walls were painted with ghoulish things," Mrs. Klages said. "The movies he watched, the music he listened to, was all violent. It was horrific stuff. He has tattoos all over him that are ghoulish. That should tip anyone off there is something wrong with him." People who knew him said he was a talented tattoo artist and some of his designs may have been inked on his own body. A local shop owner said he had heard that Klages was doing tattooing out of his apartment. Klages's father doubts that was the case. "He might have tattooed a couple of people there, but he wasn't in business doing tattoos, as far as I know," Mr. Klages said, adding that his son received Social Security disability payments because of his mental illness. According to Klages’ former girlfriend, Klages has served county jail time for attempted assault related to a knife attack on a man at Fitzy's Tavern in Ogdensburg. Source: The Capital, 2/18/08; Watertown Daily Times, 4/29/09

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New Cassel, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 24, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, described as emotionally disturbed and afraid of losing custody of her children called the police and led them into a blood-spattered bedroom where her young daughter and two small sons lay slain on a bed, investigators said. Brewer, 27, who lived with the children in an apartment in the Nassau County hamlet of New Cassel, was taken to a hospital for physical and mental examinations. Later that evening, she was charged with the murder of all three children. Neither the police nor the county medical examiner said what caused the death of the children, who were identified as Jewell Ward, 6; Michael Demesyeux, 5; and Innocent Demesyeux, 18 months old. But investigators said one appeared to have been drowned, while the others had been slashed to death. Prior History: Nassau authorities declined to discuss any motives behind the killings. But relatives and acquaintances described Ms. Brewer as emotionally unstable. The two fathers of the children said they had tried through the courts to gain custody. Ricky Ward, Jewell’s father, said he had been trying in Family Court for a year. In the 12 years that he had known her, Mr. Ward said Ms. Brewer had tried to kill herself a number of times. The Nassau police said they were investigating a report that she had jumped out a window of her apartment on the day of the killings. “He problem was her mind state,” Mr. Ward said. “She wasn’t stable and wasn’t able to communicate. She didn’t want anyone to have her kids. It’s a tragedy that my daughter’s gone.” Innocent Demesyeux, the father of Ms. Brewer’s two sons, said that he and Ms. Brewer had been battling in court for 18 months over visitation rights and custody of the boys, and that she feared she might soon lose custody. He said that he and Ms. Brewer had a date in Nassau County Family Court on February 25, and that he had hoped to win the case. He said Ms. Brewer had missed court dates recently and had refused to take drug tests. He said that he had recently been in contact with a county child protective services agency and that a representative was to have visited Ms. Brewer’s apartment on February 22. It was unclear if that visit took place. Some neighbors said Ms. Brewer had behaved bizarrely. “I used to see her walking down the street during the day in her pajamas,” said Lisa Jones, who said she was a distant relative of Ms. Brewer. Asked if Ms. Brewer had seemed mentally unstable, Ms. Jones said, “Absolutely.” The Rev. Elijah Crawford, pastor of the Healing Power Church, spoke on behalf of the family at the Westbury home of a relative of Ms. Brewer’s, where family members had gathered. He said he had been told that Ms. Brewer had snapped because money she had expected from a social services agency — money she needed for the children — had failed to arrive. She didn’t get it, and snapped out,” the pastor said. He later said of family members: “They don’t know what happened. All they know is that she snapped. They said she had great love for her children. It’s just something that happened all of a sudden.” Source: NY Times, 2/25/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New Cassel, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 24, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, described as emotionally disturbed and afraid of losing custody of her children called the police and led them into a blood-spattered bedroom where her young daughter and two small sons lay slain on a bed, investigators said. Brewer, 27, who lived with the children in an apartment in the Nassau County hamlet of New Cassel, was taken to a hospital for physical and mental examinations. Later that evening, she was charged with the murder of all three children. Neither the police nor the county medical examiner said what caused the death of the children, who were identified as Jewell Ward, 6; Michael Demesyeux, 5; and Innocent Demesyeux, 18 months old. But investigators said one appeared to have been drowned, while the others had been slashed to death. Prior History: Nassau authorities declined to discuss any motives behind the killings. But relatives and acquaintances described Ms. Brewer as emotionally unstable. The two fathers of the children said they had tried through the courts to gain custody. Ricky Ward, Jewell’s father, said he had been trying in Family Court for a year. In the 12 years that he had known her, Mr. Ward said Ms. Brewer had tried to kill herself a number of times. The Nassau police said they were investigating a report that she had jumped out a window of her apartment on the day of the killings. “He problem was her mind state,” Mr. Ward said. “She wasn’t stable and wasn’t able to communicate. She didn’t want anyone to have her kids. It’s a tragedy that my daughter’s gone.” Innocent Demesyeux, the father of Ms. Brewer’s two sons, said that he and Ms. Brewer had been battling in court for 18 months over visitation rights and custody of the boys, and that she feared she might soon lose custody. He said that he and Ms. Brewer had a date in Nassau County Family Court on February 25, and that he had hoped to win the case. He said Ms. Brewer had missed court dates recently and had refused to take drug tests. He said that he had recently been in contact with a county child protective services agency and that a representative was to have visited Ms. Brewer’s apartment on February 22. It was unclear if that visit took place. Some neighbors said Ms. Brewer had behaved bizarrely. “I used to see her walking down the street during the day in her pajamas,” said Lisa Jones, who said she was a distant relative of Ms. Brewer. Asked if Ms. Brewer had seemed mentally unstable, Ms. Jones said, “Absolutely.” The Rev. Elijah Crawford, pastor of the Healing Power Church, spoke on behalf of the family at the Westbury home of a relative of Ms. Brewer’s, where family members had gathered. He said he had been told that Ms. Brewer had snapped because money she had expected from a social services agency — money she needed for the children — had failed to arrive. She didn’t get it, and snapped out,” the pastor said. He later said of family members: “They don’t know what happened. All they know is that she snapped. They said she had great love for her children. It’s just something that happened all of a sudden.” Source: NY Times, 2/25/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: New Cassel, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 24, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, described as emotionally disturbed and afraid of losing custody of her children called the police and led them into a blood-spattered bedroom where her young daughter and two small sons lay slain on a bed, investigators said. Brewer, 27, who lived with the children in an apartment in the Nassau County hamlet of New Cassel, was taken to a hospital for physical and mental examinations. Later that evening, she was charged with the murder of all three children. Neither the police nor the county medical examiner said what caused the death of the children, who were identified as Jewell Ward, 6; Michael Demesyeux, 5; and Innocent Demesyeux, 18 months old. But investigators said one appeared to have been drowned, while the others had been slashed to death. Prior History: Nassau authorities declined to discuss any motives behind the killings. But relatives and acquaintances described Ms. Brewer as emotionally unstable. The two fathers of the children said they had tried through the courts to gain custody. Ricky Ward, Jewell’s father, said he had been trying in Family Court for a year. In the 12 years that he had known her, Mr. Ward said Ms. Brewer had tried to kill herself a number of times. The Nassau police said they were investigating a report that she had jumped out a window of her apartment on the day of the killings. “He problem was her mind state,” Mr. Ward said. “She wasn’t stable and wasn’t able to communicate. She didn’t want anyone to have her kids. It’s a tragedy that my daughter’s gone.” Innocent Demesyeux, the father of Ms. Brewer’s two sons, said that he and Ms. Brewer had been battling in court for 18 months over visitation rights and custody of the boys, and that she feared she might soon lose custody. He said that he and Ms. Brewer had a date in Nassau County Family Court on February 25, and that he had hoped to win the case. He said Ms. Brewer had missed court dates recently and had refused to take drug tests. He said that he had recently been in contact with a county child protective services agency and that a representative was to have visited Ms. Brewer’s apartment on February 22. It was unclear if that visit took place. Some neighbors said Ms. Brewer had behaved bizarrely. “I used to see her walking down the street during the day in her pajamas,” said Lisa Jones, who said she was a distant relative of Ms. Brewer. Asked if Ms. Brewer had seemed mentally unstable, Ms. Jones said, “Absolutely.” The Rev. Elijah Crawford, pastor of the Healing Power Church, spoke on behalf of the family at the Westbury home of a relative of Ms. Brewer’s, where family members had gathered. He said he had been told that Ms. Brewer had snapped because money she had expected from a social services agency — money she needed for the children — had failed to arrive. She didn’t get it, and snapped out,” the pastor said. He later said of family members: “They don’t know what happened. All they know is that she snapped. They said she had great love for her children. It’s just something that happened all of a sudden.” Source: NY Times, 2/25/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Queensbury, Warren, NY

Summary: On February 26, 2008, Stanley W. Chrostowski, 50, died after being struck by a tractor trailer. Investigators said he was driving southbound in the northbound lanes of the Northway when his car hit the truck head-on. The 2003 Ford Mustang he was driving broke in two pieces from the force of the high-speed, head-on collision. Officials at the scene said the crash happened at about 4:20 a.m., when Chrostowski struck a Stewart's truck south of Exit 18. The truck, a refrigerated box truck owned by Stewarts Shops, burst into flames, and the driver escaped with little more than a bump on his head, said West Glens Falls Fire Chief Michael Gordon. Gordon called it a "miracle" he was not seriously hurt. He was treated at Glens Falls Hospital and released. He was identified as Kevin Palmatier of Lake Luzerne. Prior History: Chrostowski had an extensive history of treatment for mental illness, and investigators were looking into whether he intentionally drove in the wrong lane in an effort to commit suicide. Two neighbors of Chrostowski who said he had recently stopped taking his medication for mental illness said they believed he committed suicide. One said he had made a comment Monday that she would have a "new neighbor soon." Source: Glenn Falls Post Star, 2/26/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Westbury, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 23, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, 27, drowned her three children, Jewell Ward, Michael Demesyeux, and Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. one by one and then laid them out on her bed in their pajamas. In the hours before the incident, Brewer, 27, told her brother that she was “fine” when he asked her how she was doing. Prior History: Relatives say that the death of Leatrice Brewer’s mother four years opened the most difficult chapter of her life. Interviews with family members and friends as well as court documents yield a portrait of her last few years: an often confrontational woman leading a life marked by substance abuse, arrests, an abusive relationship with the father of two of her children, financial struggles and mental health issues. Although raised by her maternal grandmother, Maebell Mickens, in a strict household, in more recent years Leatrice Brewer had built a criminal record including harassment and unlawful possession of marijuana, as she shuttled from one social service office to another and struggled to raise three children. Her parents had also struggled: Her father, Larry Brewer, who died in 2001, was in and out of jail during her formative years, said relatives, and her mother, Pearly Mae Mickens struggled with drug addiction and schizophrenia. As a junior in high school, Brewer was charged with petty larceny and pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. She didn't graduate, but later earned her General Educational Development certificate, a family member said. Around that time, Brewer met Ricky Ward, who would father her first child, a daughter named Jewell, who was born in June 2001. Almost two years later, Michael was born, in February 2003. His father was Innocent Demesyeux, who for a time lived with Brewer in New Cassel. In April 2003, Demesyeux took out a restraining order on Brewer after she attempted to slash him with a large kitchen knife, according to court documents. That same month, Brewer was first accused of slapping Jewell, then 1, and officials opened the first of 10 cases on her over the ensuing four years, six of which were deemed unfounded. Complaints were made by Brewer herself, Maebell Mickens, Innocent Desmesyeux and anonymous or undisclosed callers. In August 2006, Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. was born. Last fall, Brewer got a job at Kohl's in Westbury. But with the loss of that job about a month ago, Maebell Mickens said she saw a dramatic change in Brewer. She walked around in public in pajama pants, a T-shirt and a ragged hair scarf, a relative said. In mid-February, Mickens asked one of Brewer's cousins to check on Brewer. The cousin went to see her a few days later and Brewer complained that people were watching her but that she was fine. On Friday, February 22, two days before the killings, Maebell Mickens visited her granddaughter and found her depressed and complaining that her life was in disarray. Brewer again talked of people watching her and voices talking to her from the television. Mickens offered to take care of the children for a while, but Brewer said no. That same day, Nassau child protection officials sent caseworkers twice to visit Brewer, but got no answer at the door. Over the next day, Maebell Mickens couldn't get through to her granddaughter, so she sent Robert McCord, Brewer's brother, to go check on her. They talked for a while and the children seemed OK. Source: Newsday, 3/1/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Westbury, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 23, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, 27, drowned her three children, Jewell Ward, Michael Demesyeux, and Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. one by one and then laid them out on her bed in their pajamas. In the hours before the incident, Brewer, 27, told her brother that she was “fine” when he asked her how she was doing. Prior History: Relatives say that the death of Leatrice Brewer’s mother four years opened the most difficult chapter of her life. Interviews with family members and friends as well as court documents yield a portrait of her last few years: an often confrontational woman leading a life marked by substance abuse, arrests, an abusive relationship with the father of two of her children, financial struggles and mental health issues. Although raised by her maternal grandmother, Maebell Mickens, in a strict household, in more recent years Leatrice Brewer had built a criminal record including harassment and unlawful possession of marijuana, as she shuttled from one social service office to another and struggled to raise three children. Her parents had also struggled: Her father, Larry Brewer, who died in 2001, was in and out of jail during her formative years, said relatives, and her mother, Pearly Mae Mickens struggled with drug addiction and schizophrenia. As a junior in high school, Brewer was charged with petty larceny and pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. She didn't graduate, but later earned her General Educational Development certificate, a family member said. Around that time, Brewer met Ricky Ward, who would father her first child, a daughter named Jewell, who was born in June 2001. Almost two years later, Michael was born, in February 2003. His father was Innocent Demesyeux, who for a time lived with Brewer in New Cassel. In April 2003, Demesyeux took out a restraining order on Brewer after she attempted to slash him with a large kitchen knife, according to court documents. That same month, Brewer was first accused of slapping Jewell, then 1, and officials opened the first of 10 cases on her over the ensuing four years, six of which were deemed unfounded. Complaints were made by Brewer herself, Maebell Mickens, Innocent Desmesyeux and anonymous or undisclosed callers. In August 2006, Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. was born. Last fall, Brewer got a job at Kohl's in Westbury. But with the loss of that job about a month ago, Maebell Mickens said she saw a dramatic change in Brewer. She walked around in public in pajama pants, a T-shirt and a ragged hair scarf, a relative said. In mid-February, Mickens asked one of Brewer's cousins to check on Brewer. The cousin went to see her a few days later and Brewer complained that people were watching her but that she was fine. On Friday, February 22, two days before the killings, Maebell Mickens visited her granddaughter and found her depressed and complaining that her life was in disarray. Brewer again talked of people watching her and voices talking to her from the television. Mickens offered to take care of the children for a while, but Brewer said no. That same day, Nassau child protection officials sent caseworkers twice to visit Brewer, but got no answer at the door. Over the next day, Maebell Mickens couldn't get through to her granddaughter, so she sent Robert McCord, Brewer's brother, to go check on her. They talked for a while and the children seemed OK. Source: Newsday, 3/1/08

 

Date: 2/2008

Location: Westbury, Nassau, NY

Summary: On February 23, 2008, Leatrice Brewer, 27, drowned her three children, Jewell Ward, Michael Demesyeux, and Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. one by one and then laid them out on her bed in their pajamas. In the hours before the incident, Brewer, 27, told her brother that she was “fine” when he asked her how she was doing. Prior History: Relatives say that the death of Leatrice Brewer’s mother four years opened the most difficult chapter of her life. Interviews with family members and friends as well as court documents yield a portrait of her last few years: an often confrontational woman leading a life marked by substance abuse, arrests, an abusive relationship with the father of two of her children, financial struggles and mental health issues. Although raised by her maternal grandmother, Maebell Mickens, in a strict household, in more recent years Leatrice Brewer had built a criminal record including harassment and unlawful possession of marijuana, as she shuttled from one social service office to another and struggled to raise three children. Her parents had also struggled: Her father, Larry Brewer, who died in 2001, was in and out of jail during her formative years, said relatives, and her mother, Pearly Mae Mickens struggled with drug addiction and schizophrenia. As a junior in high school, Brewer was charged with petty larceny and pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. She didn't graduate, but later earned her General Educational Development certificate, a family member said. Around that time, Brewer met Ricky Ward, who would father her first child, a daughter named Jewell, who was born in June 2001. Almost two years later, Michael was born, in February 2003. His father was Innocent Demesyeux, who for a time lived with Brewer in New Cassel. In April 2003, Demesyeux took out a restraining order on Brewer after she attempted to slash him with a large kitchen knife, according to court documents. That same month, Brewer was first accused of slapping Jewell, then 1, and officials opened the first of 10 cases on her over the ensuing four years, six of which were deemed unfounded. Complaints were made by Brewer herself, Maebell Mickens, Innocent Desmesyeux and anonymous or undisclosed callers. In August 2006, Innocent Desmesyeux Jr. was born. Last fall, Brewer got a job at Kohl's in Westbury. But with the loss of that job about a month ago, Maebell Mickens said she saw a dramatic change in Brewer. She walked around in public in pajama pants, a T-shirt and a ragged hair scarf, a relative said. In mid-February, Mickens asked one of Brewer's cousins to check on Brewer. The cousin went to see her a few days later and Brewer complained that people were watching her but that she was fine. On Friday, February 22, two days before the killings, Maebell Mickens visited her granddaughter and found her depressed and complaining that her life was in disarray. Brewer again talked of people watching her and voices talking to her from the television. Mickens offered to take care of the children for a while, but Brewer said no. That same day, Nassau child protection officials sent caseworkers twice to visit Brewer, but got no answer at the door. Over the next day, Maebell Mickens couldn't get through to her granddaughter, so she sent Robert McCord, Brewer's brother, to go check on her. They talked for a while and the children seemed OK. Source: Newsday, 3/1/08

 

Date: 3/2008

Location: Queensbury, Warren, NY

Summary: On March 2, 2008, Michael J. Butler, 62, repeatedly rammed a police car with his truck. Butler is a Vietnam War veteran with an extensive history of mental illness who told investigators he was upset about his arrest by police days earlier. He told Warren County sheriff's officers he was angry with police about his arrest on February 24 after an alleged attack on members of VFW Post 3754 in Warrensburg, during which he broke the post commander's nose and threatened patrons with a knife. He was charged in that case with the misdemeanors of third-degree assault, second-degree menacing and resisting arrest and was jailed overnight before being released on $1,500 cash bail. Butler’s anger resulted in a wild scene on Gurney Lane, when he allegedly rammed a Warren County sheriff's patrol car with his pickup at least three times, sending it into a snowbank before the officers shot at least twice through their car's windshield into the truck. Neither Butler nor the deputies were seriously injured. The deputies who fired the shots are patrol officers Scott Rawson and William St. John. Rawson was driving the patrol car at the time of the altercation. Prior History: Michael J. Butler has had a number of run-ins with police over the years, including a May 1995 arrest for using a chain saw to vandalize the lobby of the Veterans Administration Hospital in Albany. The former U.S. Marine was found not guilty of the criminal charges in that case by reason of insanity, and he was treated for several years in a military mental hospital in North Carolina. Source: Post Star, 3/4/08

 

Date: 3/2008

Location: Queensbury, Warren, NY

Summary: On March 2, 2008, Michael J. Butler, 62, repeatedly rammed a police car with his truck. Butler is a Vietnam War veteran with an extensive history of mental illness who told investigators he was upset about his arrest by police days earlier. He told Warren County sheriff's officers he was angry with police about his arrest on February 24 after an alleged attack on members of VFW Post 3754 in Warrensburg, during which he broke the post commander's nose and threatened patrons with a knife. He was charged in that case with the misdemeanors of third-degree assault, second-degree menacing and resisting arrest and was jailed overnight before being released on $1,500 cash bail. Butler’s anger resulted in a wild scene on Gurney Lane, when he allegedly rammed a Warren County sheriff's patrol car with his pickup at least three times, sending it into a snowbank before the officers shot at least twice through their car's windshield into the truck. Neither Butler nor the deputies were seriously injured. The deputies who fired the shots are patrol officers Scott Rawson and William St. John. Rawson was driving the patrol car at the time of the altercation. Prior History: Michael J. Butler has had a number of run-ins with police over the years, including a May 1995 arrest for using a chain saw to vandalize the lobby of the Veterans Administration Hospital in Albany. The former U.S. Marine was found not guilty of the criminal charges in that case by reason of insanity, and he was treated for several years in a military mental hospital in North Carolina. Source: Post Star, 3/4/08

 

Date: 4/2008

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: On April 2, 2008, Felipe Velasquez wielded a machete slashing a stranger and tossed Molotov cocktails at cops from his roof. According to Velasquez’s family, he is a schizophrenic who was off his meds at the time of the incident. During the rampage, Velasquez hit Bernard Hoffman, 45, in the head with a machete in front of the Richmond Hill home Velasquez shares with his uncle. Hoffman fended off his attacker with his umbrella, disarmed him, grabbed the weapon and called cops. Velasquez then climbed onto his roof and threw the handmade combustibles, hitting an unmarked police car that erupted in flames. The 90-minute standoff ended when cops persuaded Velasquez to come down. Hoffman was taken to New York Hospital Medical Center of Queens for a cut on his head and was subsequently released. Prior History: Felipe Velasquez's uncle said his nephew recently spent a month at Elmhurst Hospital Center and was diagnosed with mental illness. Source: New York Daily News, 4/3/08

 

Date: 6/2008

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On June 9, 2008, Orangetown police used a Taser to subdue the Rev. Patricia Ackerman, a peace activist suffering a mental crisis who had barricaded herself and an employee inside her Broadway apartment, holding off police for nearly two hours. The police were trying to take Ackerman for a mental health examination based on a commitment letter. Her friends said Ackerman, an Episcopal priest, is bipolar and had stopped taking her medication. Her behavior had been erratic and she had been acting out, causing alarm among her friends and associates. "Patty hasn't been acting like herself," said Phyllis Frank, a top official with the Volunteer Counseling Service and a social activist. "People knew she needed help." She and Frank Mancione were called to the building by police, along with Mayor John Shields. Ackerman specifically asked to speak with them and police thought they could help end the standoff. Several other friends and supporters spoke from the street to Ackerman, who leaned out a second-floor window. The woman was being held against her will because Ackerman had barricaded herself inside the apartment. Police Chief Kevin Nulty said criminal charges would be filed against Ackerman. Source: Journal News, 6/10/08, 6/15/08

 

Date: 6/2008

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On June 9, 2008, Orangetown police used a Taser to subdue the Rev. Patricia Ackerman, a peace activist suffering a mental crisis who had barricaded herself and an employee inside her Broadway apartment, holding off police for nearly two hours. The police were trying to take Ackerman for a mental health examination based on a commitment letter. Her friends said Ackerman, an Episcopal priest, is bipolar and had stopped taking her medication. Her behavior had been erratic and she had been acting out, causing alarm among her friends and associates. "Patty hasn't been acting like herself," said Phyllis Frank, a top official with the Volunteer Counseling Service and a social activist. "People knew she needed help." She and Frank Mancione were called to the building by police, along with Mayor John Shields. Ackerman specifically asked to speak with them and police thought they could help end the standoff. Several other friends and supporters spoke from the street to Ackerman, who leaned out a second-floor window. The woman was being held against her will because Ackerman had barricaded herself inside the apartment. Police Chief Kevin Nulty said criminal charges would be filed against Ackerman. Source: Journal News, 6/10/08, 6/15/08

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: On July 12, 2008, Donelle Dumunn was fatally shot by Eric Hutchinson after Dumunn shot Hutchinson’s wife, Tawana Simmons. Dumunn, 28, had burst in and shot Simmons in a fit of rage, police said. Hutchinson then fatally shot Dumunn and fled - taking both his gun and the boarder's, according to police. Hutchinson was in custody yesterday but had not been charged with a crime. "It was a landlord-tenant dispute," said a police source of the bizarre firefight. "They want this guy out, so he shoots her. And the husband hears the shooting and gets his rifle." Simmons, 38, a mother of three, was in critical but stable condition at Mary Immaculate Hospital. She and her husband, Hutchinson, 41, had been trying to evict Dumunn, their boarder of three months, for nonpayment of rent. "Donelle was bipolar and off his medication," said his godsister Renee Spikes, 30, of Jamaica. "He was usually a kind and generous person who was trying to get his life back on track." Source: New York Daily News, 7/13/08

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: Queens, Queens, NY

Summary: On July 12, 2008, Donelle Dumunn was fatally shot by Eric Hutchinson after Dumunn shot Hutchinson’s wife, Tawana Simmons. Dumunn, 28, had burst in and shot Simmons in a fit of rage, police said. Hutchinson then fatally shot Dumunn and fled - taking both his gun and the boarder's, according to police. Hutchinson was in custody yesterday but had not been charged with a crime. "It was a landlord-tenant dispute," said a police source of the bizarre firefight. "They want this guy out, so he shoots her. And the husband hears the shooting and gets his rifle." Simmons, 38, a mother of three, was in critical but stable condition at Mary Immaculate Hospital. She and her husband, Hutchinson, 41, had been trying to evict Dumunn, their boarder of three months, for nonpayment of rent. "Donelle was bipolar and off his medication," said his godsister Renee Spikes, 30, of Jamaica. "He was usually a kind and generous person who was trying to get his life back on track." Source: New York Daily News, 7/13/08

 

Date: 1/2008

Location: Peekskill, Westchester, NY

Summary: On January 3, 2008, LaTonya Fisher fatally stabbed 17-year-old Justin Woodward. Woodward had gone to Fisher's apartment that night to break off their relationship. She stabbed him once in the back with a 10-inch kitchen knife. Peekskill police said Fisher left Woodward mortally wounded for 90 minutes before calling for help. Officers arrived to find her holding his body on her living-room floor. In June 2008, LaTonya Fisher, the 16-year-old Peekskill girl who killed Justin Woodward, her boyfriend, when he broke up with, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and weapon charges in exchange for a 10-year prison sentence. State Supreme Court Justice Lester Adler said he chose the prison term partly due to the girl's horrific upbringing, saying she was abused by her stepfather and was a victim of gang assault. Adler said Fisher suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and bipolar disorder, also known as manic depression. But Deborah Alston, Woodward’s mother, Janet Fisher, said the term was too lenient. "She took a treasure from me," cried Alston. "He was my other half." Alston said her slain son helped care for his brother, who suffers from multiple sclerosis. She sobbed after telling a reporter that she would never have grandchildren. "God gave me an angel - he did," she said. "Who knew the biggest threat to him was standing in front of me?" Subsequent History: On August 28, 2008, Westchester County Judge Lester Adler handed down a 10-year sentence that to Justin Woodward's killer, 17-year-old LaTonya Fisher. Deborah Alston, Woodward’s mother, was not happy with the sentence. Alder said he understood Alston's frustration, but added that there were several factors behind the sentence, including that Fisher was convicted of manslaughter, not murder, had no prior record, suffers from mental illnesses and was sexually abused for years by a stepfather. Prior History: Fisher, who suffers from bipolar and post-traumatic stress disorders, stabbed Woodward, a 17-year-old Hendrick Hudson High School student, on January 3 in her family's apartment in Peekskill. Woodward went to Fisher's apartment that night to break up with her and tell her he was moving out of state. She stabbed him in the back with a 12-inch knife, which perforated his heart and a lung, then left him on the floor to die, authorities said. She called 911 at 8:12 p.m. after stabbing him, but hung up. When a police dispatcher called back, Fisher told them that she had misdialed while trying to dial 914 so police did not respond. Fisher called 911 again at 9:47 p.m., and police arrived to see her holding Woodward on the floor, where he was pronounced dead. Source: Journal News, 6/20/08; Hudson Valley Journal News, 8/29/08

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On July 17, 2008, police fatally shot Spencer Parris, 39, in the chest. The officer, whom the Police Department would not identify, had been on patrol with a partner when they were flagged down by a taxi driver carrying a female passenger. The woman, 28, whom the police did not identify, told them she had been assaulted by Parris and needed to return to their apartment to retrieve belongings before going to stay with a friend. Police Department’s chief spokesman, Paul J. Browne said police went with her, knocked on the door to their apartment, and identified themselves. Parris said he was not coming out, but suddenly flung open the door, with a knife in his hand. Browne alleged that Parris told police several times that he was going to kill them. The officer, who had backed down the hallway was backed against a neighbor’s door when he shot Parris. Parris was pronounced dead at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital. Allegedly, Parris had punched his companion in the face and had pulled her hair after they argued over plans to see a midnight movie. The woman had filed a report in February, soon after they moved into the apartment, complaining that he had assaulted her. The police have reports of two domestic incidents there in March. The woman told the police that they met over the Internet, and that she later found out that he had bipolar disorder and had once tried to commit suicide. Source: New York Times, 7/19/08

 

Date: 7/2008

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On July 17, 2008, police fatally shot Spencer Parris, 39, in the chest. The officer, whom the Police Department would not identify, had been on patrol with a partner when they were flagged down by a taxi driver carrying a female passenger. The woman, 28, whom the police did not identify, told them she had been assaulted by Parris and needed to return to their apartment to retrieve belongings before going to stay with a friend. Police Department’s chief spokesman, Paul J. Browne said police went with her, knocked on the door to their apartment, and identified themselves. Parris said he was not coming out, but suddenly flung open the door, with a knife in his hand. Browne alleged that Parris told police several times that he was going to kill them. The officer, who had backed down the hallway was backed against a neighbor’s door when he shot Parris. Parris was pronounced dead at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell hospital. Allegedly, Parris had punched his companion in the face and had pulled her hair after they argued over plans to see a midnight movie. The woman had filed a report in February, soon after they moved into the apartment, complaining that he had assaulted her. The police have reports of two domestic incidents there in March. The woman told the police that they met over the Internet, and that she later found out that he had bipolar disorder and had once tried to commit suicide. Source: New York Times, 7/19/08

 

Date: 6/2010

Location: Elmont, Nassau, NY

Summary: On June 23, 2010, 24-year-old Dario Ormejuste fatally shot his brother, Guerby Ormejuste, a Rikers Island correction officer, with his automatic service weapon. He used the same gun to kill their father, Bob, police said. 30-year old Guerby Ormejuste and his 65-year-old father Bob Ormejuste were found dead inside a home on Long Island, according to Nassau County police. The gruesome discovery was made by police who responded to the home to check on the status of Guerby Ormejuste when he didn't show up for work. When police arrived they found two bodies inside the home. One victim was found in the kitchen, while the other was found in the basement of the home. Law enforcement officials said Dario Ormejuste has emotional problems that may include schizophrenia. In addition, police were looking for his mother, Rose "Maryse" Ormejuste, who is in her 60's. She, along with a gray 1998 Lexus, had been missing since June 19. Dario Ormejuste was arrested outside his his home, puffing on a cigarette as his brother and father lay dead inside. Source: WPIX.com, 6/23/10; NYDailyNews.com, 6/24/10; LongIslandPress.com, 6/24/10

 

Date: 6/2010

Location: Elmont, Nassau, NY

Summary: On June 23, 2010, 24-year-old Dario Ormejuste fatally shot his brother, Guerby Ormejuste, a Rikers Island correction officer, with his automatic service weapon. He used the same gun to kill their father, Bob, police said. 30-year old Guerby Ormejuste and his 65-year-old father Bob Ormejuste were found dead inside a home on Long Island, according to Nassau County police. The gruesome discovery was made by police who responded to the home to check on the status of Guerby Ormejuste when he didn't show up for work. When police arrived they found two bodies inside the home. One victim was found in the kitchen, while the other was found in the basement of the home. Law enforcement officials said Dario Ormejuste has emotional problems that may include schizophrenia. In addition, police were looking for his mother, Rose "Maryse" Ormejuste, who is in her 60's. She, along with a gray 1998 Lexus, had been missing since June 19. Dario Ormejuste was arrested outside his his home, puffing on a cigarette as his brother and father lay dead inside. Source: WPIX.com, 6/23/10; NYDailyNews.com, 6/24/10; LongIslandPress.com, 6/24/10

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Poestenkill, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2010, 70-year-old Robert Pryor Sr. called his daughter, 49-year-old Laurie Fisher, and his granddaughter’s boyfriend, 24-year-old Anthony Delgado, home from a trip to a local grocery store and then shot them both in the chest as they came through the front door. Pryor then turned the revolver on himself, and inflicted a fatal gunshot wound to the head, police said. Authorities had no motive other than that they believe Pryor may have battled mental illness. Following the shootings, Delgado was in critical condition and Fisher was in serious condition at Albany Medical Center Hospital. Police were called to the house by Fisher, who was able to call 911 after being shot. Delgado had been living with Pryor to help him with his medical condition. Source: TimesUnion.Com, 7/14/10; cbs6albany.com, 7/14/10

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Poestenkill, Rensselaer, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2010, 70-year-old Robert Pryor Sr. called his daughter, 49-year-old Laurie Fisher, and his granddaughter’s boyfriend, 24-year-old Anthony Delgado, home from a trip to a local grocery store and then shot them both in the chest as they came through the front door. Pryor then turned the revolver on himself, and inflicted a fatal gunshot wound to the head, police said. Authorities had no motive other than that they believe Pryor may have battled mental illness. Following the shootings, Delgado was in critical condition and Fisher was in serious condition at Albany Medical Center Hospital. Police were called to the house by Fisher, who was able to call 911 after being shot. Delgado had been living with Pryor to help him with his medical condition. Source: TimesUnion.Com, 7/14/10; cbs6albany.com, 7/14/10

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Manhattan, New York C, NY

Summary: On July 19, 2010, 33-year-old Julian Kurita fatally stabbed his father, 70-year-old Fumitaka “Frank” Kurita in the neck in the family's apartment and then slashed his own wrist, police said. Julian was taken to Bellevue Hospital for a psychiatric evaluation, police said. Police did not release any details about the events that lead to Frank Kurita's death, other than to say his son appeared to be mentally disturbed, and neighbors were at a loss to describe what could have sparked a confrontation between father and son. Joan Morrow, a retired preschool teacher who lived one floor below the Kurita family, said Julian Kurita left college after a bout with mental illness. She said she believed he had struggled with schizophrenia since his early 20s. He faced murder and weapons charges. Subsequent History: On May 21, 2012, the 30-year-old Kurita was convicted of murder. Source: DNAinfo.com, 7/19/10; NYDailyNews.com, 7/20/10, 5/2/12, 5/21/12

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: West Seneca, Erie, NY

Summary: On April 19, 2009, 31-year-old Corey P. Cochran stabbed his 6- year-old son Dalton in the chest. The incident ended when Cohran’s wife, Rebecca, managed to get the knife from him, stab him several times, and flee the house with their four children to a neighbor’s home. Corey pursued his wife and children but was apprehended without further incident. Dalton was taken to Women and Children's Hospital where he was listed in stable condition. Corey was admitted to Erie County Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries. Rebecca was treated at ECMC and released after sustaining defensive wounds on her hands while wresting two knives away from her husband. Subsequent History: On March 7, 2011, Corey P. Cochran, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, pleaded not guilty to because of mental disease or defect to attempted murder charges. A judge ordered him to undergo further mental examination. Both defense and prosecution mental health experts found that Cochran was suffering from auditory hallucinations and ideas about gaining immortality by cutting out his son's heart when he attacked his son. Subsequent History: On July 7, 2011, 33-year-old Corey Cochran was sentenced to a secure facility after a judge ruled he had a dangerous mental disorder. Two doctors issued reports saying their psychiatric examinations of Cochran revealed signs of paranoid schizophrenia. As a result of the ruling, Cochran was to be taken to a secure facility as a danger to himself and others, rather than to a regular psychiatric hospital ward. Cochran’s attorney said Cochran attacked his son when he was off medication. The boy was hospitalized with a stab wound to the chest but recovered. Source: Buffalo News, 4/21/09, 3/7/11, 7/8/11

 

Date: 4/2009

Location: West Seneca, Erie, NY

Summary: On April 19, 2009, 31-year-old Corey P. Cochran stabbed his 6- year-old son Dalton in the chest. The incident ended when Cohran’s wife, Rebecca, managed to get the knife from him, stab him several times, and flee the house with their four children to a neighbor’s home. Corey pursued his wife and children but was apprehended without further incident. Dalton was taken to Women and Children's Hospital where he was listed in stable condition. Corey was admitted to Erie County Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries. Rebecca was treated at ECMC and released after sustaining defensive wounds on her hands while wresting two knives away from her husband. Subsequent History: On March 7, 2011, Corey P. Cochran, diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, pleaded not guilty to because of mental disease or defect to attempted murder charges. A judge ordered him to undergo further mental examination. Both defense and prosecution mental health experts found that Cochran was suffering from auditory hallucinations and ideas about gaining immortality by cutting out his son's heart when he attacked his son. Subsequent History: On July 7, 2011, 33-year-old Corey Cochran was sentenced to a secure facility after a judge ruled he had a dangerous mental disorder. Two doctors issued reports saying their psychiatric examinations of Cochran revealed signs of paranoid schizophrenia. As a result of the ruling, Cochran was to be taken to a secure facility as a danger to himself and others, rather than to a regular psychiatric hospital ward. Cochran’s attorney said Cochran attacked his son when he was off medication. The boy was hospitalized with a stab wound to the chest but recovered. Source: Buffalo News, 4/21/09, 3/7/11, 7/8/11

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Katonah, Westchester, NY

Summary: On July 31, 2010, 39-year-old Lisa Turkki stabbed her two nieces several times while babysitting them in their parents' home. Turkki called police and told authorities what he had done. When police arrived at the home, Turkki was outside while the the 7- and 9-year-old girls were sprawled on the kitchen floor, bleeding but conscious and responsive. They survived the attack and and were in stable condition and improving following surgery. Turkki, the girls' aunt and their mother's sister, sustained a minor injury to her leg that was possibly self-inflicted. Subsequent History: On April 18, 2011, 40-year-old Lisa Turkki was found not responsible because of mental illness. Turkki was to be committed to a psychiatric institution. Her case will be reviewed every two years and if she is ever found to have recovered, she could be released, the district attorney's office said. Turkki said she was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder and may have missed some medications. Subsequent History: On June 2, 2011, Turkki was committed to a secure facility. Turkki had no history of violent behavior, even though she had battled mental illness since she was 15. Psychologists determined Turkki suffered from schizoaffective disorder of a bipolar type. Source: CBSNews.com, 8/2/10; MSNBC.com, 8/2/10; Wall Street Journal, 4/18/11; lohud.com, 6/3/11

 

Date: 7/2010

Location: Katonah, Westchester, NY

Summary: On July 31, 2010, 39-year-old Lisa Turkki stabbed her two nieces several times while babysitting them in their parents' home. Turkki called police and told authorities what he had done. When police arrived at the home, Turkki was outside while the the 7- and 9-year-old girls were sprawled on the kitchen floor, bleeding but conscious and responsive. They survived the attack and and were in stable condition and improving following surgery. Turkki, the girls' aunt and their mother's sister, sustained a minor injury to her leg that was possibly self-inflicted. Subsequent History: On April 18, 2011, 40-year-old Lisa Turkki was found not responsible because of mental illness. Turkki was to be committed to a psychiatric institution. Her case will be reviewed every two years and if she is ever found to have recovered, she could be released, the district attorney's office said. Turkki said she was diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder and may have missed some medications. Subsequent History: On June 2, 2011, Turkki was committed to a secure facility. Turkki had no history of violent behavior, even though she had battled mental illness since she was 15. Psychologists determined Turkki suffered from schizoaffective disorder of a bipolar type. Source: CBSNews.com, 8/2/10; MSNBC.com, 8/2/10; Wall Street Journal, 4/18/11; lohud.com, 6/3/11

 

Date: 5/2011

Location: Syracuse, Onondaga, NY

Summary: On May 5, 2011, 55-year-old Benjamin Campione was fatally shot by police near the Regional Transportation Center. According to police, when Campione was confronted by Officers, he pulled a pellet gun that looked exactly like a Smith & Wesson revolver from his waistband and pointed it at Officers prompting them to open fire. Campione’s two cousins said he suffered from mental illness and was often homeless, wandering the streets of Syracuse. The cousins confirmed that Campione would sometimes carry a pellet gun, which would be used for show. They say he was "never violent." Prior History: Campione’s brother said he’d been to police three times in the past year, alerting them that his younger brother wasn’t taking his medication and was slipping deeper into paranoid schizophrenia. According to the brother, Campione was diagnosed while serving in the Army in the late 1970s. He said Campione had a history of stopping his medication and acting bizarrely. Source: CYNcentral.com, 5/5/11, 5/8/11; The Post-Standard, 5/7/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: New York, New York, NY

Summary: On July 3, 2011, 41-year-old Jonathan Schwartz fatally stabbed his 67-year-old mother, Barbara Schwartz, in the neck and torso. Jonathan Schwartz called 911 twice after killing his mother, first to admit the crime, then to retract the confession. Jonathan Schwartz who suffers from schizophrenia, may not have been on his meds. Source: CBSNewYork.com, 7/3/11; New York Post, 7/4/11

 

Date: 2/2011

Location: Syracuse, Onondago, NY

Summary: On February 1, 2011, 19-year-old Ravaun Mitchell was shot by Syracuse police after he refused to drop a knife. Mitchell walked into the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses on Fayette Street, pulled out a knife, and when he refused to drop it, police shot him in the arm and shoulder. While in the ambulance on his way to the hospital, Mitchell told police he had hoped they would shoot him because he "wanted to die." Subsequent History: On June 29, 2011, a judge ruled that Mitchell was still mentally ill and dangerous. The judge ordered Mitchell held in the secure custody of state mental health officials for the next six months until another evaluation can be conducted. Mitchell’s defense attorney said the February 1 incident was the onset of mental health problems for his client and that Mitchell had responded well while on anti-psychotic medication following the incident. Source: 9WSYR.com, 2/24/11; The Post-Standard, 6/29/11

 

Date: 11/2009

Location: Valley Cottage, Rockland, NY

Summary: On November 29, 2009, 32-year-old Jami Erlich was was beaten and stabbed to death inside her condo. Two days later, 32-year-old Eric Lau was arrested and charged with her death. Police had been searching for Lau, who lived in the same condo and disappeared after Erlich’s death. Several of Erlich's friends said she told them that Lau constantly called her and asked her out on dates. The friends said Erlich referred to Lau as her "creepy neighbor." Subsequent History: In July 2011, psychologists reported that Lau was mentally fit to stand trial on charges of murdering Erlich. In March, a judge had ordered Lau to be evaluated for at least 90 days after hearing testimony on Lau's mental health. He had a long history of mental illness and violence beginning in childhood. Lau had attended schools for children with mental issues. On September 26, 2011, Lau’s murder trial was tentatively scheduled for November. Subsequent History: On January 24, 2012, a state Supreme Court justice authorized Lau to undergo another round of psychiatric exams to determine if he was mentally fit to stand trial in the killing of Erlich. Those exams could lead to a second competency hearing. The decision came with a new indictment charging Lau for the second time with a felony count of second-degree assault on a Rockland correction officer at the county jail. Lau was accused of slamming a jail seargeant’s hand into a cell door opening in September, leading to the officer needing several stitches. In March 2010, Lau attacked an officer from behind at the jail, leading to his first indictment on an assault count. Subsequent History: On April 23, 2012, Lau pleaded guilty to murdering Erlich. Lau’s guilty plea came after a judge ruled on April 19 that he was fit to stand trial and assist in his own defense. The disposition included his guilty plea to two counts of third-degree assault, a misdemeanor, for attacking two correction officers inside the Rockland County jail. The attacks came December 24, 2009, and September 26, 2010. Lau originally was indicted on a charge of second-degree assault, a felony, in each case. Source: Zimbio.com, 11/30/09; NYDailyNews.com, 12/2/09; LoHud News, 7/7/11, 11/11/11, 1/25/12, 4/20/12, 4/24/12; The Journal News, 9/26/11

 

Date: 8/2009

Location: Schenectady, Schenectady, NY

Summary: On August 1, 2009, 25-year-old James Tomlin, diagnosed with schizophrenia, was fatally shot by a Schenectady police officer. Police said the incident occurred when Tomlin first approached a woman on her porch and demanded a cigarette at knifepoint. He also attempted several carjackings, threatening people with a large butcher knife. When officers caught up with him, they tried to get him to drop the knife. When Tomlin lunged at Officer Ed Ritz, Ritz shot him. Subsequent History: On July 1, 2011, Ritz was cleared of any wrongdoing in the fatal shooting of Tomlin by the Schenectady County District Attorney. In the aftermath of the shooting, the DA had raised the possibility of presenting the case to a grand jury. Tomlin's mother told the DA that her son, diagnosed with schizophrenia, was not on his medication at the time of the incident, according to the report. Source: CapitalRegion.ynn.com, 8/4/09; Times Union, 7/7/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: White Creek, Washington, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2011, 23-year-old Matthew Slocum, a parolee with a history of mental illness, fatally shot his mother, Lisa Harrington, her husband, Dan Harrington, and Harrington’s son, Josh O’Brien in their home, then ignited the house to cover it up. Officials said all involved, the Harringtons, Slocum, Colegrove and their son, lived at the home. Slocum then took his four-month-old Raymond Slocum, and the boy’s mother, Loretta Colegrove, Slocum’s girlfriend, and held them against their will initiating an Amber Alert. Slocum turned himself in to authorities that evening in Gilsum, N.H., after a four-hour standoff. The infant and mother were safe. Prior History: Slocum's criminal history includes a sexual misconduct arrest for allegedly having sex with an underage girl in 2005,as well as involvement a 2005-2006 burglary and larceny cases for which he was sentenced to state prison. Slocum was paroled in 2009 but violated parole twice and was returned to state prison both times. At the time of the killings, there was a pending harassment charge in Greenwich Town Court against him for allegedly making a threat toward another person. Cambridge-Greenwich Police Chief George Bell said it was common for Slocum's mother to intervene on her son's behalf during his run-ins with the law - beyond what police typically see with parents whose children repeatedly get arrested. Source: North County Gazette, 7/13/11; CBSBoston.com, 7/13/11; timesunion.com, 7/15/11; PostStar.com, 7/15/11, 7/19/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: White Creek, Washington, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2011, 23-year-old Matthew Slocum, a parolee with a history of mental illness, fatally shot his mother, Lisa Harrington, her husband, Dan Harrington, and Harrington’s son, Josh O’Brien in their home, then ignited the house to cover it up. Officials said all involved, the Harringtons, Slocum, Colegrove and their son, lived at the home. Slocum then took his four-month-old Raymond Slocum, and the boy’s mother, Loretta Colegrove, Slocum’s girlfriend, and held them against their will initiating an Amber Alert. Slocum turned himself in to authorities that evening in Gilsum, N.H., after a four-hour standoff. The infant and mother were safe. Prior History: Slocum's criminal history includes a sexual misconduct arrest for allegedly having sex with an underage girl in 2005,as well as involvement a 2005-2006 burglary and larceny cases for which he was sentenced to state prison. Slocum was paroled in 2009 but violated parole twice and was returned to state prison both times. At the time of the killings, there was a pending harassment charge in Greenwich Town Court against him for allegedly making a threat toward another person. Cambridge-Greenwich Police Chief George Bell said it was common for Slocum's mother to intervene on her son's behalf during his run-ins with the law - beyond what police typically see with parents whose children repeatedly get arrested. Source: North County Gazette, 7/13/11; CBSBoston.com, 7/13/11; timesunion.com, 7/15/11; PostStar.com, 7/15/11, 7/19/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: White Creek, Washington, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2011, 23-year-old Matthew Slocum, a parolee with a history of mental illness, fatally shot his mother, Lisa Harrington, her husband, Dan Harrington, and Harrington’s son, Josh O’Brien in their home, then ignited the house to cover it up. Officials said all involved, the Harringtons, Slocum, Colegrove and their son, lived at the home. Slocum then took his four-month-old Raymond Slocum, and the boy’s mother, Loretta Colegrove, Slocum’s girlfriend, and held them against their will initiating an Amber Alert. Slocum turned himself in to authorities that evening in Gilsum, N.H., after a four-hour standoff. The infant and mother were safe. Prior History: Slocum's criminal history includes a sexual misconduct arrest for allegedly having sex with an underage girl in 2005,as well as involvement a 2005-2006 burglary and larceny cases for which he was sentenced to state prison. Slocum was paroled in 2009 but violated parole twice and was returned to state prison both times. At the time of the killings, there was a pending harassment charge in Greenwich Town Court against him for allegedly making a threat toward another person. Cambridge-Greenwich Police Chief George Bell said it was common for Slocum's mother to intervene on her son's behalf during his run-ins with the law - beyond what police typically see with parents whose children repeatedly get arrested. Source: North County Gazette, 7/13/11; CBSBoston.com, 7/13/11; timesunion.com, 7/15/11; PostStar.com, 7/15/11, 7/19/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: White Creek, Washington, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2011, 23-year-old Matthew Slocum, a parolee with a history of mental illness, fatally shot his mother, Lisa Harrington, her husband, Dan Harrington, and Harrington’s son, Josh O’Brien in their home, then ignited the house to cover it up. Officials said all involved, the Harringtons, Slocum, Colegrove and their son, lived at the home. Slocum then took his four-month-old Raymond Slocum, and the boy’s mother, Loretta Colegrove, Slocum’s girlfriend, and held them against their will initiating an Amber Alert. Slocum turned himself in to authorities that evening in Gilsum, N.H., after a four-hour standoff. The infant and mother were safe. Prior History: Slocum's criminal history includes a sexual misconduct arrest for allegedly having sex with an underage girl in 2005,as well as involvement a 2005-2006 burglary and larceny cases for which he was sentenced to state prison. Slocum was paroled in 2009 but violated parole twice and was returned to state prison both times. At the time of the killings, there was a pending harassment charge in Greenwich Town Court against him for allegedly making a threat toward another person. Cambridge-Greenwich Police Chief George Bell said it was common for Slocum's mother to intervene on her son's behalf during his run-ins with the law - beyond what police typically see with parents whose children repeatedly get arrested. Source: North County Gazette, 7/13/11; CBSBoston.com, 7/13/11; timesunion.com, 7/15/11; PostStar.com, 7/15/11, 7/19/11

 

Date: 7/2011

Location: White Creek, Washington, NY

Summary: On July 13, 2011, 23-year-old Matthew Slocum, a parolee with a history of mental illness, fatally shot his mother, Lisa Harrington, her husband, Dan Harrington, and Harrington’s son, Josh O’Brien in their home, then ignited the house to cover it up. Officials said all involved, the Harringtons, Slocum, Colegrove and their son, lived at the home. Slocum then took his four-month-old Raymond Slocum, and the boy’s mother, Loretta Colegrove, Slocum’s girlfriend, and held them against their will initiating an Amber Alert. Slocum turned himself in to authorities that evening in Gilsum, N.H., after a four-hour standoff. The infant and mother were safe. Prior History: Slocum's criminal history includes a sexual misconduct arrest for allegedly having sex with an underage girl in 2005,as well as involvement a 2005-2006 burglary and larceny cases for which he was sentenced to state prison. Slocum was paroled in 2009 but violated parole twice and was returned to state prison both times. At the time of the killings, there was a pending harassment charge in Greenwich Town Court against him for allegedly making a threat toward another person. Cambridge-Greenwich Police Chief George Bell said it was common for Slocum's mother to intervene on her son's behalf during his run-ins with the law - beyond what police typically see with parents whose children repeatedly get arrested. Source: North County Gazette, 7/13/11; CBSBoston.com, 7/13/11; timesunion.com, 7/15/11; PostStar.com, 7/15/11, 7/19/11

 

Date: 9/2011

Location: Homer, Cortland, NY

Summary: On September 21, 2011, 30-year-old Geoffrey J. Thompson attacked 36-year-old Abdul M. Mumin, a cab driver, as Mumin was driving him from New York City to Buffalo. Thompson choked Mumin so hard his eyes began to bleed. Before the incident, Thompson’s mother had reported him missing to Amherst police. She told police that Thompson is bipolar and might be headed to New York City. That night, Thompson called a relative to say that he was in New York and staying at the Grand Hyatt in Manhattan. That same night, Thompson approached Mumin and asked Mumin to drive him to John F. Kennedy International Airport. After Thompson found that all flights to Buffalo that night were already booked, he asked Mumin to drive him all the way to Buffalo. Thompson said he was willing to pay the $800 cab fare. Thompson attacked Mumin after they stopped for gas. Thompson, who had gone to an ATM machine, told Mumin he could only pay $300. After discussion, Thompson told Mumin he would pay the full amount. A few minutes later, Thompson suddenly pounced on Mumin and began screaming: “You’re not going to get your money. You have to be dead.” A struggle ensued which ended when the car crashed into a traffic sign. Thompson ran into a nearby cemetery, where a Homer police officer chased him down. Both men were taken to an area hospital and treated. Neither had to be admitted. Source: Buffalo News, 9/24/11

 

Date: 3/2011

Location: Buffalo, Erie, NY

Summary: During the period between March 28 and 29, 2011, 50-year-old Brian Rossel fatally beat and strangled his 84-year-old father, Donald Rossel. The elder Rossel’s body was found by police. In July 2011, Brian Rossel was arrested and charged after a police investigation. Subsequent History: On October 18, 2011, a judge ruled that Brian Rossel was mentally incapacitated and should be committed for up to a year based upon two mental health evaluations. Rossel was diagnosed with Schizophrenia. Source: WIVB.com, 7/8/11; Buffalo News, 10/19/11

 

Date: 5/2010

Location: Manhattan, New York, NY

Summary: On May 11, 2010, 33-year-old Devi Silvia threw her 19-month-old child into the Hudson River before jumping in herself. The pair were spotted bobbing in the water by passers-by who came across an empty stroller on a pier. Rescuers were called to an area of the river near 82nd Street. The pair were pulled out of the river about 10 blocks south of there. The fire department rescued the woman, who was face-down in the water, and police rescued the child, who was face-up. Both were resuscitated. The girl was hospitalized in critical but stable condition. Silvia was charged with attempted murder, assault, reckless endangerment and endangering the welfare of a child. Her arraignment was conducted via video link from a hospital where was held for a psychological evaluation. Subsequent History: On February 10, 2012, a judge ruled that the 34-year-old Silvia could go back to her native India and be reunited with her children. Silvia had been undergoing treatment and entered into an insanity plea deal in December with prosecutors. The judge told Silvia she must continue treatment, stay on her medication and provide status reports to the court. Silvia's baby, Jessica, who was 19 months old when she was thrown into the frigid river off a West 70th Street pier, was rescued by authorities, who quickly responded and saved both Silvia and the child after the mother jumped in too. She has not been allowed to see her two children, including the daughter she nearly drowned, since her arrest after the May 11, 2010, incident. The children have been staying with family in India after Silvia was ordered by the court to stay away from them. The family had been living on the Upper West Side after Silvia's husband took a job in New York. Source: Associated Press, 5/12/10; WABC-TV NY, 6/21/10; New York Post, 6/22/10; DNA Info, 11/21/11, 2/10/12

 

Date: 11/2011

Location: Brooklyn, Kings, NY

Summary: On November 27, 2011, 20-year-old Renado Ward fatally stabbed his mother, 47-year-old Chruminline Ward, in front of her grandchildren. The children were not hurt in the incident. Renado Ward, who had a history of mental illness, had been released from a psych ward of Kings County Hospital six days before the incident. Following the incident, he was returned back to the hospital. Source: New York Post, 11/28/11

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ABOUT THE DATABASE: This database includes summaries of news articles in which an individual with a neurobiological brain disorder (usually untreated) is involved ina violent episode, either as a victim or perpetrator. The stories come from published reports in the newspapers; the database can therefore never cover all the countless unreported tragedies that occur every day. And sadly, most of the stories in which the ill individual is a victim rarely make it into the newspaper. One notable exception these days is incidents in which a person with a serious brain disorder is shot by police.

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