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IMPORTANT & BREAKING: FAMILIES IN MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS ACT INTRODUCED

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A Guide to Kendra’s Law: New York’s Law for Assisted Outpatient Treatment (AOT)

Kendra’s Law (New York Mental Hygiene Law § 9.60) allows courts to order certain individuals with brain disorders to comply with treatment while living in the community. This court-ordered treatment is called assisted outpatient treatment. The law took effect on November 8, 1999.∗

Kendra’s Law is an important advance. It allows individuals to be ordered into treatment without ordering them into a hospital. In addition, the criteria to place someone in assisted outpatient treatment are easier to meet than the "imminent dangerousness" standard often required for inpatient commitment in New York. Kendra’s Law allows someone to be ordered into treatment "to prevent a relapse which or deterioration which would likely result in serious harm to the patient or others." In other words, there is no need to wait until a deteriorating consumer actually is dangerous to self or others, as in the inpatient standard; under Kendra’s Law you can start procedures to "prevent a relapse" that could lead to dangerousness. The law includes strict eligibility criteria and numerous consumer protections.

In enacting Kendra’s Law, the legislature found that some people, as a result of mental illness, have great difficulty taking responsibility for their own care, and often reject outpatient treatment offered to them on a voluntary basis. These individuals often commit suicide; become homeless; end up in jail; or, on rare occasions, are involved in acts of violence. Family members and caregivers often must stand by helplessly and watch their loved ones and patients decompensate to actual "dangerousness" before they are allowed to facilitate treatment. Assisted outpatient treatment is a new tool that may help in these situations. But it is not a panacea. Assisted outpatient treatment is meant to help consumers, not punish them. Kendra’s Law makes New York the 41st state to adopt assisted outpatient treatment.

OVERVIEW

Arranging for assisted outpatient treatment is technical and somewhat cumbersome. Assisted outpatient treatment is only available to individuals who meet certain defined criteria. Consumers can only be placed in the program by a court, which must first receive a petition from one of a defined group of individuals. The petition must give the reasons why the petitioner believes the consumer meets the criteria and be accompanied by an affidavit from a physician who has examined or tried to examine the consumer within 10 days prior to filing the petition.

Once the court receives the petition and the physician’s affidavit it will schedule a hearing within 3 days. Notice of the hearing must be given to the consumer and certain other individuals. The consumer is provided with free legal representation from mental hygiene legal services and extensive due process protections throughout the assisted outpatient treatment process.

In the hearing, the court hears testimony and takes evidence from all the parties, including a doctor who has examined the consumer. If the consumer has refused to be examined and the court believes the individual may meet the criteria for assisted outpatient treatment, the court can order an examination and adjourn the hearing until after it is completed. If the consumer has been examined and the court finds the individual meets all the criteria for placement in assisted outpatient treatment, it will have a treatment plan developed and order the consumer to comply with it.

The time frame for creating the treatment plan varies slightly depending on who the petitioner is. If the petitioner is a government official, the treatment plan will have been prepared by the time of the hearing. If the petitioner is anyone else and the court believes the individual meets the criteria for assisted outpatient treatment, the court will have the state prepare a treatment plan and conduct a second hearing to finalize it within three days. The consumer will be ordered to comply with the treatment plan once the court approves it. The service providers identified in the plan will be required to supply the services ordered in it as well as monitor the patient’s condition and treatment compliance.

Consumer compliance with the court’s order is monitored through case managers, ACT teams, and other treatment providers.

If an individual fails to comply with his or her treatment plan, interventions are triggered which can ultimately result in the individual’s rehospitalization for 72 hours for treatment and evaluation to determine if he or she meets the inpatient commitment criteria.

Initial assisted outpatient treatment orders are for up to six months and each renewal can be for up to one year.

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What services can be included in an assisted outpatient treatment plan?

Assisted outpatient treatment orders have to include case management services or assertive community treatment team services and may also include:

    • 1. medication;
    • 2. blood or urinalysis tests to determine compliance with prescribed medications;
    • 3. individual or group therapy;
    • 4. day or partial day programs;
    • 5. educational and vocational training;
    • 6. supervised living;
    • 7. alcohol or substance abuse treatment;
    • 8. alcohol and/or substance abuse testing for those with a history of alcohol or drug abuse and for whom such testing is necessary to prevent a deterioration of their condition (court orders for drug/alcohol tests are subject to review every six months); and
    • 9. any other services prescribed to treat the person’s mental illness and to either assist the person in living and functioning in the community or to help prevent a relapse or deterioration that may reasonably be predicted to result in suicide or the need for hospitalization.

What are the eligibility criteria for assisted outpatient treatment?

A patient may be placed in assisted outpatient treatment only if, after a hearing, the court finds that all of the following have been met. The consumer must:

  • 1. be eighteen years of age or older; and
  • 2. suffer from a mental illness; and
  • 3. be unlikely to survive safely in the community without supervision, based on a clinical determination; and
  • 4. have a history of non-compliance with treatment that has: i. been a significant factor in his or her being in a hospital, prison or jail at least twice within the last thirty-six months or; ii. resulted in one or more acts, attempts or threats of serious violent behavior toward self or others within the last forty-eight months; and
  • 5. be unlikely to voluntarily participate in treatment; and
  • 6. be, in view of his or her treatment history and current behavior, in need of assisted outpatient treatment in order to prevent a relapse or deterioration which would be likely to result in:
  • i. a substantial risk of physical harm to the consumer as manifested by threats of or attempts at suicide or serious bodily harm or conduct demonstrating that the consumer is dangerous to himself or herself, or ii. a substantial risk of physical harm to other persons as manifested by homicidal or other violent behavior by which others are placed in reasonable fear of serious physical harm; and
  • 7. be likely to benefit from assisted outpatient treatment; and
  • 8. if the consumer has a health care proxy, any directions in it will be taken into account by the court in determining the written treatment plan. However, nothing precludes a person with a health care proxy from being eligible for assisted outpatient treatment.

Any time spent in a hospital or jail immediately prior to the filing of the petition does not count towards either the 36 or 48- month time limits in criterion No. 4 above. In other words, if an individual spent the two months prior to the filing in a hospital, the court can then look back 38 months (36+2=38) to see if he or she meets criterion No. 4(i).

Who can petition the court for assisted outpatient treatment?

Any of the following persons can file a petition with the court for a consumer to be placed in assisted outpatient treatment:

  • 1. any adult person living with the consumer;
  • 2. the parents, spouse, adult sibling, or adult child of the consumer;
  • 3. if the consumer is an inpatient, the hospital director;
  • 4. the director of a program providing mental health services to the consumer in whose institution the consumer resides;
  • 5. a treating or supervising psychiatrist;
  • 6. the director of community services, or his or her designee, or the social services official of the city or county in which the consumer is present or believed to be present; or
  • 7. the consumer’s parole or probation officer.

The petition must be filed in the supreme or county court in the county in which the consumer is present or reasonably believed to be present.

What has to be in or included with the petition?

The petition must state (1) the consumer is present, or believed to be present, within the county where the petition is filed; (2) all the criteria for outpatient treatment; and (3) the facts supporting the belief that the consumer meets all the criteria.

The petition has to be accompanied by an affirmation or affidavit of a physician (who can not be the petitioner) which states either:

  • 1. the physician examined the consumer no more than ten days prior to the submission of the petition, the physician recommends assisted outpatient treatment, and the physician is willing to testify at the hearing; or
  • 2. the physician or his or her designee (no more than ten days prior to the filing of the petition) tried to but could not persuade the consumer to be examined, that the physician has reason to suspect the consumer meets the criteria assisted outpatient treatment, and that the physician is willing to examine the consumer and testify at the hearing

Who has to be notified when you file a petition?

The petitioner has to cause written notice of the petition to be given to the consumer and:

  • 1. the consumer’s nearest relative; and
  • 2. the Mental Hygiene Legal Service; and
  • 3. the current health care agent appointed by the consumer, if known; and
  • 4. as many as three additional persons, if designated in writing to receive notice by the consumer; and
  • 5. the Director of assisted outpatient treatment for the county; and
  • 6. the Director of Community Services, if the director is not the petitioner.

The New York State Office of Mental Health will appoint a Director of Assisted Outpatient Treatment who will be responsible for the program in each county. The Director of Community Services is an already existing county official. For the name of these individuals (Nos. 5 and 6), call the NYS Office of Mental Health (518-474-4403) or NAMI-New York (800-950-FACT).

What must the court do before it holds a hearing?

After receiving a petition, the court is required to have a hearing on it within three days (excluding weekends and holidays). It must also notify all the parties of the hearing date.

Continuances will only be allowed for good cause. Before granting one, the court shall consider the need for an examination by a physician or the need to provide assisted outpatient treatment expeditiously.

What happens at the first hearing?

The court will hear testimony and, if advisable, examine the consumer (in or out of court). The testimony need not be limited to the facts included in the petition.

If the consumer fails to appear at the hearing despite appropriate attempts to elicit attendance have failed, the court may conduct the hearing in the consumer’s absence.

However, the court is prohibited from ordering assisted outpatient treatment unless a physician, who has personally examined the consumer no more than ten days before the filing of the petition, testifies in person at the hearing. If the consumer refuses to be examined and the court finds reasonable cause to believe the allegations in the petition to be true, it then may order the consumer be taken into custody and transported to a hospital for examination for no longer than 24 hours.

How is the treatment plan developed?

A consumer ordered into assisted outpatient treatment is required to follow a treatment plan approved by the court.

An examining physician appointed by the county’s director of outpatient treatment or a director of an approved assisted outpatient treatment program must develop the treatment plan. A physician must testify and explain it to the court. Unless the petitioner is an employee of one of the state agencies empowered to develop treatment plans, it is unlikely that such a plan will be presented at the initial hearing.

If the court finds that the consumer meets the criteria but a treatment plan has not been developed, the court will order the director of community services to provide one to the court within three days, excluding weekends and holidays. Another hearing will then be held to finalize and approve the plan.

In developing a treatment plan, the physician will provide the consumer; the treating physician; and, upon the request of the patient, one person selected by the consumer with an opportunity to actively participate in its development. Also, if the patient has one, the court will consider any directions included in a health care proxy. However, the existence of a health proxy will not prevent a person with a health care proxy from being ordered into assisted outpatient treatment.

The physician developing the treatment plan will state:

  • 1. which categories of assisted outpatient treatment are recommended and the rationale for each;
  • 2. facts which establish that such treatment is the least restrictive alternative; and,
  • 3. if the proposed treatment plan includes medication, the types or classes recommended, physical and mental effects of such medication (both beneficial and detrimental), and whether such medication should be self-administered or administered by a professional.

The physician should specify the types and dosage ranges of medication most likely to provide "maximum benefit," since the court will consider what will be to the consumer’s maximum benefit when ordering treatment.

What kinds of decisions can the court make?

If after hearing all relevant evidence, the court finds that the consumer does not meet the criteria for assisted outpatient treatment, the court will dismiss the petition.

If the court finds by clear and convincing evidence that the consumer meets the criteria for court-ordered outpatient treatment and there is no appropriate, feasible, and less restrictive alternative, the court can order the consumer to receive assisted outpatient treatment for up to six months (renewals can be for up to a year).

The order will include the categories of treatment that the consumer is to receive, but cannot require any unless it was recommended by both the examining physician and included in the written treatment plan. The order may specify whether such medication should be self-administered or administered by an authorized professional as well as delineate the types and dosage ranges of medication most likely to provide maximum benefit.

If the petitioner is the director of a hospital that operates an assisted outpatient treatment program, the court order will direct the hospital director to provide or arrange for all categories of treatment for the assisted outpatient throughout the period of the order.

For all other persons, the order will require the director of community services to make sure that all the categories of services in the treatment order are supplied to the consumer. This is very important, because not only is the consumer being ordered into treatment, the director of community services is being ordered to provide treatment.

How can the treatment plan be changed?

The director of an assisted outpatient treatment program needs court approval to make any material change in a treatment order unless the change was contemplated in the original order. A material change is the addition or deletion of a category of assisted outpatient treatment or any deviation, without the patient’s consent, from an existing order relating to the administration of medicines. An assisted outpatient treatment program does not need court approval to institute non-material changes.

How can the assisted outpatient treatment order be renewed?

If the Director of Community Services determines that a consumer requires further assisted outpatient treatment, the director shall apply prior to the expiration of the assisted outpatient treatment order for a subsequent order for a period that can last up to one year. The procedures for obtaining a renewal for the director and all others are the same as for an initial order except the consumer does not have to meet either the 36 month or 48 month rule regarding previous hospitalizations or acts of violence.

What if a consumer fails to comply with an assisted outpatient treatment order?

If someone placed in assisted outpatient treatment fails or refuses to comply with the treatment order despite efforts made to solicit compliance, a physician may request that the consumer be brought to a hospital if in his or her clinical judgment, the consumer "may" meet a current "inpatient"commitment standard, i.e., "danger to self or others."

A physician may consider if a consumer refuses to take medications as required by the court order, or either refuses to take, or fails a blood test, urinalysis, or alcohol or drug test as required by the court order, when determining whether the consumer is in need of an examination to determine whether he or she meets the standard for placement in inpatient care.

One inpatient standard referenced in Kendra’s Law, §9.27, allows committal if the consumer has (1) a mental illness for which care and treatment in a hospital is essential to his or her welfare and (2) the consumer's judgment is so impaired that he or she may need or is unable to understand his or her need for treatment. However, some New York courts have interpreted this very narrowly, sometimes to the point where some form of dangerousness is required. Courts may allow this more flexible inpatient standard to be applied as it is written in the case individuals who have "failed" on assisted outpatient treatment.

If he or she believes that a consumer may meet the current inpatient commitment standard, the physician may request a director of an assisted outpatient treatment program or certain others empowered to direct peace officers, sheriff’s deputies, ambulance services, or approved mobile crisis outreach teams to transport such consumers to hospitals. At the hospital, the consumer may be retained for observation, examination and treatment for up to seventy-two hours in order to determine whether treatment in a hospital pursuant to one of the existing inpatient commitment standards is needed. Thus, if the physician decides that a consumer on assisted outpatient treatment is non-compliant and "may" meet the inpatient commitment criteria, the doctor can order that person hospitalized for up to 72 hours to see if they meet inpatient commitment procedures.

If at any time during this period the person is found not to meet the involuntary inpatient commitment criteria, he or she must be released unless kept on a voluntary basis. However, continued non-compliance can result in subsequent 72-hour evaluations.

What rights and protections do consumers have?

A consumer has the right to:

  • 1. free legal representation by the Mental Hygiene Legal Service (or other counsel, at the expense of the consumer) at all stages of an assisted outpatient treatment proceeding;
  • 2. present evidence, call witnesses and cross-examine adverse witnesses;
  • 3. not be involuntarily committed or held in contempt of court solely for failure to comply with a treatment order;
  • 4. move the court to stay, vacate or modify the assisted outpatient treatment order at any time (along with Mental Hygiene Legal Service or anyone else acting on the consumer’s behalf) and;
  • 5. not be deemed legally incapacitated solely on the determination that he or she is in need of assisted outpatient treatment.

Also, a petitioner, physician, or anyone else making a false statement or providing false information in a petition or hearing is subject to criminal prosecution.

Will the mental health system petition for me?

Kendra’s Law allows families and others to petition the court to place someone in assisted outpatient treatment. But it is easier and less costly if the mental health system, rather than relatives, files the petition. However, New York’s mental health system is notoriously reluctant to file petitions, so you must be persistent. In case it ever becomes necessary, below are some tips on convincing mental health authorities to file a petition for your loved one.

Hospitals: For a relative who is in a hospital, families should try to convince the hospital to file a petition before the person is discharged. Ask the doctor. If he or she refuses, you should appeal to the director of psychiatry and hospital director. The higher up you go, the more likely you are to get what is needed.

Director of Community Services ("DCS"): This individual is the local (not state) official responsible for coordinating local services and for the receipt and investigation of persons alleged to be in need of assisted outpatient treatment in each locality.

The law requires the DCS to establish an assisted outpatient treatment program to serve the community. If someone needs assisted treatment, as much information as possible (including why the individual meets each of the required criteria) should be provided to the DCS in order to convince him or her to file a petition for assisted outpatient treatment.

If the person you are seeking treatment for lives in New York City, contact Dr. Michael Lesser, Medical Director of that city’s Department of Mental Health, (212) 219-5602. Elsewhere in the state, you can call your local NAMI ((800)950-FACT) or MHA chapter to find out who the DCS in your county is. This information is also available on the Office of Mental Health's Website, www.omh.state.ny.us, and from the head of the Kendra's Law Program, (518) 402-2416.

Assisted Outpatient Treatment Coordinator: Each county is required to have an individual assisted outpatient treatment program and the coordinator of one is virtually certain to be able to file petitions.

The names and phone numbers for the heads of New York City’s programs are listed at the end of this guide. To learn who is in charge of a program elsewhere in the state, call your local NAMI or MHA chapter, Director of Community Services, or Mental Health Commissioner.

Regional Program Coordinator: This is the state official charged with overseeing the assisted outpatient treatment programs in whichever of the five designated regions of the state your loved one lives. He or she is responsible for making sure the system is working and that providers are supplying the services that the courts have ordered them to provide. A Regional Program

Coordinator is not authorized to file petitions, but can be an important information source when you are seeking an assisted outpatient treatment order for a loved one and even more valuable at making sure your relative actually gets the treatment that the court orders.

The five Regional Coordinators are listed at the end of this guide.

As a Final Attempt: If you cannot convince any of the people described above to file a petition, call the Office of Mental Health’s Kendra's Law Project Director, Keith Brennan, (518) 402-2416, and/or Counsel, John Tauriello, (518) 474-1331.

Individual Petitioners: Even if you cannot convince any of these officials to file a petition, you can still do so as long you are in one the categories of people listed in the "Who can petition the court for assisted outpatient treatment?" section.

Contacts for Mental Health Officials:

Anyone who knows someone in need of assisted outpatient treatment or is displeased with how the program is working should submit written comments to the officials above. If you are having problems with the care of a consumer in assisted outpatient treatment, write to the officials above plus the court that ordered the treatment, the case manager, the treatment providers, and the Commissioner of the Office of Mental Health. By notifying all of them, you will increase the odds that your concerns will be addressed.

KENDRA’S LAW CONTACTS

These contacts may become dated. Theoretically there is an up to date list here: http://bi.omh.ny.gov/aot/about?p=aot-contacts

If you want someone admitted to the AOT program, you are going to have to fight hard and be persistent. If you are not able/willing to do that, and you have the resources, file a petition yourself. Following are people you can try to cajole into letting someone into the program, but because Commissioner Hogan does not support the program, these people do not have the resources they need. Thank you.

Long Island Region
Marilyn Sullivan

Long Island Field Office

Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

Building 45-3

998 Crooked Hill Road

West Brentwood, NY 11717-1087

Ph: 631-761-2092

Fax: 631-761-2820

pgocmrs@omh.state.ny.us

Laura Gravina

Ph: 631-761-2486

Western New York Region

Patricia Bylewski (716) 885-4219 (x234)

 

Central New York Counties:

Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Clinton, Cortland, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Otsego, St. Lawrence

Bill Licurse

Central New York Field Office

545 Cedar Street

Syracuse, NY 13210-2319

Ph: 315-426-3941

Fax: 315-426-3950

coadwjl@omh.state.ny.us

Sharon Frisbie

Ph: 315-426-3934

Rebecca Briney (315) 472-2097

New York City Coordinator for NYC

Dr. Michael Lesser (212) 219-5602

New York State Coordinator for NYC

Susan Shilling

New York City Field Office

330 Fifth Avenue, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10001-3101

Ph: 212-330-6380 (718) 221-7667

Fax: 212-330-6414

coopsxs@omh.state.ny.us

Paul Iappini Ph: 212-330-6376

Manhattan/Rikers Island

Bellevue Hospital Dr. Berger (212) 562-4219 or (212) 562-7315

Queens

Najwa Awad, Ph: 212-330-6377

Elmhurst Hospital Dr. Garza (718) 334-3547 or (718) 963-5744

Kings/Richmond

Al Johnson Ph: 212-330-6392

Brooklyn/Staten Island - Woodhull Hospital Dr. Trachtenberg (718) 963-5744

Bronx

Brenda Thompson Ph: 212-330-6379

Bronx - North Central Bronx Hospital Dr. Rogge (718) 519-2475 (718) 519-2455

Hudson River:

Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Sullivan, Ulster, Warren, Washington, Westchester

Melissa Wagner

Hudson River Field Office

4 Jefferson Plaza

3rd Floor

Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

Ph: 845-454-8694

Fax: 845-454-8218

coctmkw@omh.state.ny.us

Jan Spalding (845) 454-8229

Columbia, Greene, Rensselaer, Rockland

Sharon Kuriger

Ph: 845-454-8229

Long Island/Nassau/Suffolk

Marilyn Sullivan

Long Island Field Office

Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

Building 45-3

998 Crooked Hill Road

West Brentwood, NY 11717-1087

Ph: 631-761-2092

Fax: 631-761-2820

pgocmrs@omh.state.ny.us

Laura Gravina

Ph: 631-761-2486

Western NY: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tioga, Tompkins, Wayne, Wyoming, Yates

Lynda Battaglia

Western New York Field Office

737 Delaware Avenue

Suite 200

Buffalo, NY 14209

Ph: 716-885-4219, Ext. 234

Fax: 716-885-4096

owadlmb@omh.state.ny.us

Jean Hockstaff

Ph: 607-737-4974

If you have to appeal to the state:

NYS OMH Central Office Keith Brennan

Assistant Counsel

Central Office

44 Holland Avenue 8th. Floor

Albany, NY 12229

Ph: 518-474-1331

Fax: 518-473-7863

colekjb@omh.state.ny.us

NYS OMH Kendra’s Law Project Director

(518) 402-2416

 

If your relative needs AOT and none of these work, call the Treatment Advocacy Center at 703 294-6005

Long Island Region

Marilyn Sullivan

Long Island Field Office

Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

Building 45-3

998 Crooked Hill Road

West Brentwood, NY 11717-1087

Ph: 631-761-2092

Fax: 631-761-2820

pgocmrs@omh.state.ny.us

Laura Gravina

Ph: 631-761-2486

Western New York Region

Patricia Bylewski (716) 885-4219 (x234)

Central New York Counties:

Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Clinton, Cortland, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Otsego, St. Lawrence

Bill Licurse

Central New York Field Office

545 Cedar Street

Syracuse, NY 13210-2319

Ph: 315-426-3941

Fax: 315-426-3950

coadwjl@omh.state.ny.us

Sharon Frisbie

Ph: 315-426-3934

Rebecca Briney (315) 472-2097

New York City Coordinator for NYC

Dr. Michael Lesser (212) 219-5602

New York State Coordinator for NYC

Susan Shilling

New York City Field Office

330 Fifth Avenue, 9th Floor

New York, NY 10001-3101

Ph: 212-330-6380 (718) 221-7667

Fax: 212-330-6414

coopsxs@omh.state.ny.us

Paul Iappini Ph: 212-330-6376

Manhattan/Rikers Island

Bellevue Hospital Dr. Berger (212) 562-4219 or (212) 562-7315

Queens

Najwa Awad, Ph: 212-330-6377

Elmhurst Hospital Dr. Garza (718) 334-3547 or (718) 963-5744

Kings/Richmond

Al Johnson Ph: 212-330-6392

Brooklyn/Staten Island - Woodhull Hospital Dr. Trachtenberg (718) 963-5744

Bronx

Brenda Thompson Ph: 212-330-6379

Bronx - North Central Bronx Hospital Dr. Rogge (718) 519-2475 (718) 519-2455

Hudson River:

Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Sullivan, Ulster, Warren, Washington, Westchester

Melissa Wagner

Hudson River Field Office

4 Jefferson Plaza

3rd Floor

Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

Ph: 845-454-8694

Fax: 845-454-8218

coctmkw@omh.state.ny.us

Jan Spalding (845) 454-8229

Columbia, Greene, Rensselaer, Rockland

Sharon Kuriger

Ph: 845-454-8229

Long Island/Nassau/Suffolk

Marilyn Sullivan

Long Island Field Office

Pilgrim Psychiatric Center

Building 45-3

998 Crooked Hill Road

West Brentwood, NY 11717-1087

Ph: 631-761-2092

Fax: 631-761-2820

pgocmrs@omh.state.ny.us

Laura Gravina

Ph: 631-761-2486

Western NY: Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Tioga, Tompkins, Wayne, Wyoming, Yates

Lynda Battaglia

Western New York Field Office

737 Delaware Avenue

Suite 200

Buffalo, NY 14209

Ph: 716-885-4219, Ext. 234

Fax: 716-885-4096

owadlmb@omh.state.ny.us

Jean Hockstaff

Ph: 607-737-4974

If you have to appeal to the state:

NYS OMH Central Office Keith Brennan

Assistant Counsel

Central Office

44 Holland Avenue 8th. Floor

Albany, NY 12229

Ph: 518-474-1331

Fax: 518-473-7863

colekjb@omh.state.ny.us

NYS OMH Kendra’s Law Project Director

(518) 402-2416

 

If your relative needs AOT and none of these work, call the Treatment Advocacy Center at 703 294-6005

(www.omh.state.ny.us)

OMH Kendra’s Law Project Director

Glen Leibman (518) 402-2416

Regional Kendra’s Law Program Coordinators

Central New York Region

Rebecca Briney (315) 472-2097

Hudson River Region

Jan Spalding (845) 454-8229

Long Island Region

Marilyn Sullivan (631) 761-2092

Western New York Region

Patricia Bylewski (716) 885-4219 (x234)

New York City

Susan Shilling (718) 221-7667

(For New York City also see below)

____________________________________

N. Y. C. DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH

Kendra’s Law Coordinator

Dr. Michael Lesser (212) 219-5602

Assisted Outpatient Treatment Programs in NYC

Bronx - North Central Bronx Hospital

Dr. Rogge (718) 519-2475

Brooklyn/Staten Island - Woodhull Hospital

Dr. Trachtenberg (718) 963-5744

Manhattan - Bellevue Hospital

Dr. Berger (212) 562-4219

Queens - Elmhurst Hospital

Dr. Garza (718) 334-3547

∗ In addition to provisions for assisted outpatient treatment, Kendra’s Law also includes (1) a mechanism to see that individuals with brain disorders who are discharged from hospitals and jails and not yet Medicaid eligible can continue to receive medications while their application is pending; (2) provisions for improved record sharing among hospitals and mental health care providers so that a facility can access a consumer’s records, even if the consumer was treated at other facilities; (3) procedures to improve the use of conditional discharge for individuals released from hospitals prior to the expiration of their inpatient commitment period, and (4) extension of the outpatient commitment program at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. However, this summary only explains the provisions related to assisted outpatient treatment.


The information on Mental Illness Policy Org. is not legal advice or medical advice. Do not rely on it. Discuss with your lawyer or medical doctor. Mental Illness Policy Org was founded in February 2011 and in order to maintain independence does not accept any donations from companies in the health care industry or government. That makes us dependent on the generosity of people who care about these issues. If you can support our work, please send a donation to Mental Illness Policy Org., 50 East 129 St., Suite PH7, New York, NY 10035. Thank you. Contact office@mentalillnesspolicy.org Contact DJ Jaffe, founder http://mentalillnesspolicy.org.